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I need some links to articles, etc - a bit morbid topic

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Nancy in VA, Apr 28, 2016.

  1. sarahspins

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    All of this. As an adult with T1, I don't really drink often, and if I do, it's rarely more than a drink or two. It's really just too complicated to deal with more than that, more often (and that's aside from the issues of having 3 kids and being an otherwise responsible adult). I've come to that decision by trial and error, basically it's not worth the risk of scary lows (and it's CRUCIAL for every T1 to know that glucagon WILL NOT work with alcohol in your system, the liver prioritizes processing alcohol above all else, and the liver is what responds to glucagon), or dealing with highs from mixed drinks without feeling comfortable aggressively bolusing/correcting. Not all adults with T1 will come to that conclusion, and I will admit that I did drink a lot more before I had T1 (and yeah, not legally, and I was only 16/17 and my parents did not know) so in some ways I am lucky that I "got it out of my system" before I had more to worry about, so I really was NOT drinking by the time I got to college.. at least not with the typical college crowd (even before I had a kid, was married, etc, I didn't really "fit in" with most people my age in school, which limited my opportunities to do stupid things at that point).

    I have only gotten really really drunk once as an adult with T1, and it was with my dad, who I think was scared by the whole experience more than he expected he would be (I was 23 or 24 at the time, so 3 or 4 years after my diagnosis, and it was the last time I've been that drunk). I was not in the best place emotionally... I had recently "quit" college for good (knowing I probably wouldn't go back), I had been fighting with my husband about a number of things (which have since been resolved, thankfully), and I got out of town for the weekend to visit my dad and his family just to breathe a bit, and my dad took me out to blow off some steam... it didn't end well for me (I puked in the parking lot, and in the yard at my dad's house, and my BG was in the upper 200's and low 300's and stayed there all night, and no, I didn't end up in DKA), but it could have been worse.

    I will say this... as the parent of a 15 year old, the thought of him doing the same idiotic things I did as a teenager scares the crap out of me, and that is without T1 in the mix for him. My heart really goes out to anyone in this situation, and I wish I had better advice to give.
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    We went to a preparing for college session at a JDRF event last year. The endo on the panel said that if the teens are not showing the responsibility to manage their diabetes, then they're not mature enough to leave for college and should go to a community college until they assume the responsibility D demands.
     
  3. Nancy in VA

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    She WAS showing responsibility before this year. I think its definitely a case of college rebellion and peer pressure. Mom went to a session about diabetes and college and then got the daughter hooked up with a counselor through the endocrinologist office.

    The daughter was 12 when she was diagnosed and took on all of her care herself from the beginning (her choice), so I don't think mom understands burnout as much as the people who experience it or the parents who have had to manage for their kids.

    They are definitely debating whether she is responsible enough to be away from home next year. They know there isn't a quick fix and I've been sending her resources as I find them. I found a great vlog from Six Until Me a few years back that I forwarded to her that she shared with her daughter. It was basically a "sometimes this disease just sucks" video, but I think it was good for the mom to hear it from someone else how hard it can be and the daughter to know she isn't alone. I had suggested we reach out to JDRF for a teen or young adult mentor who is T1 and mom said her daughter wouldn't go for that. But I will suggest it again because I'm thinking she's probably feeling pretty alone with her disease right now.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    That's just the sort of small minded, punitive, "compliance" rubbish I'd expect from JDRF affiliated endo. Like it's ever "that" black and white. Like self-care is some on-off switch. (not directed at the poster but the spirit of the comment they relay)
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    I think it probably originated out of concern for the well-being of the individual, but I was surprised at the strength to which he said it. And I agree with you about it not being black and white. Our awesome endo jumped to some wrong conclusions and missed the both the life happenings and emotional fallout on blood sugars at our last appointment, and it's made things harder, not easier, when we're both trying our hardest at this and the high numbers still keep occurring for so many, many, many different reasons despite our efforts. We watched some of Ginger Vieiria's videos last night. When she ranted about how the endo wants to know what caused a high number three weeks prior and her response was "I have diabetes," my daughter immediately exclaimed, "YES!!" One of the upper 300s we saw in the past week was because she didn't hear the pod fail at work until the music was turned off at close (which says a lot about the music volume, that it could drown out a screaming pod!!). She was in the 80s when she caught it, but she needed to drive, so she decided not to dose the normal pod change extra units because she needed to be safe driving home and didn't want to risk going low while driving. Excellent choice, but the lack basal caught up to her and she arrived home near 400. Nothing she could have done to prevent that, but it added to the discouragement of yet another day with numbers higher than we'd like and the numbers not telling the story behind them nor the good decisions that she was trying to make.
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yes. :wink:
     
  7. wilf

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    What a turkey.
     
  8. rgcainmd

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    My sentiments exactly. I can't help but wonder whether people who give this kind of advice actually have a child with T1D and/or live in the real world...
     
  9. sarahspins

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    No kidding. Not to mention there is the certain type of personality that simply won't do things for themselves as long as someone is there to do it for them... so if you don't give them opportunities to prove themselves, they never will. Doesn't mean at all that they can't do it.
     

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