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I feel low...school does nothing!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by shannong, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. shannong

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    I'm really upset with how my son's teacher handled things today. My son told his teacher that he felt low at 11:15am. My DS did a blood check and he was at 5.0 (90). His teacher told him that he was fine because he was not under 4.Well sure enough at lunch time (an hour later), he does a blood check and he has dropped to 3.0 (54). I get a phone call that he has gone low.

    I'm upset too because I called his teacher this morning and told her that his numbers have been all over the place lately and that she should call me at his blood check times because I may need to change something. My son goes to a small private school. There are only 5 kids in his class, so I thought he would be cared for really well there. Since September, they have forgotten to give him his 10am snack 2x (causing him to go low) and now this. I have already talked to them before about how my DS feels when he is going low, and they need to trust him on that and give him something or call me! I don't know how I can cover my bases anymore than I already do. Any suggestions on what I should be saying to the school? Oh, and his teacher, happens to be the principal of the school too (yes, it is a very small school).
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    I'd look into a CGM. That way if he's starting to feel low at 90 because he's dropping, it's going to let them know he's dropping...or just alarm low at 80 so that they treat. There's no reason he should be dropping into the 50s just because he was at an ideal number at the moment of the test.

    I know it is a circular way of solving the problem, but they don't live with diabetes and learn its quirks the way we do. I think I'd feel utterly confused at times with all the variables.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I don't know... it doesn't sound malicious, it sounds like the teacher heard 90 and figured he was good. I think that's a mistake we've all made. As for the snacks, to miss it twice also seems within the realm of reason.

    I understand that you are upset, but if we admit that it's hard to be a parent of a kid with Type 1, I suspect that it isn't very easy to be a teacher of a kid with type 1. Just keep reminding, encourage your son to communicate and worse comes to worse revise your low threshold for school hours.
     
  4. shannong

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    That's a great idea.

    And I agree, not malicious, but really not thinking. Also, with a student/teacher ratio of 5:1, and also the fact that this private school really promoted the fact that many students go to that school for medical reasons that need extra care, I feel let down. We've gone over the whole thing about trusting my son when he says he feels low and either re-testing in 15 minutes or calling me. It's not the first time I feel they have not handled things well.

    On the other hand, I totally get your point that his teacher doesn't have all the knowledge that comes from being a parent of a kid with Type 1. I gain a lot of perspective hearing from all of you on this forum. Thanks for that! Been thinking a lot more about a CGM too.
     
  5. swellman

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    I just want to say that I think you've stated something that needs to be emphasized. I think we've all been guilty of condemning the actions of teachers, nurses, etc. in the past but I think it's an extremely good point to make: It's hard enough for the parents of children with T1D to make great decisions and I can only imagine how incredibly difficult it is for people who have no formal training or parental experience AND who has responsibility for other children to make consistently good decision on diabetes care.

    I suggest we suck in the frustration and anger and use each situation as a learning tool.
     
  6. scoobydoo

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    It does appear that a lack of diabetes education may be at the root of the problem. I know that several of the hospitals near me run education classes for both parents and carers, and maybe you could research if there is anything similar near you that you could suggest that the teacher attend.
    Or if not, maybe get her some booklets that she could read up further.
    I think one of the most difficult things for people who are not parents of CWD to grasp is that the BG levels are continually fluctuating. 90 could be a good number but the child may very well be on the way down....
    I still get asked by family members, if my son's numbers have "stabilized" yet, 6 months after dx.

    I hope things improve for you....
     
  7. mmgirls

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    I have it stated in my daughter d care stuff that IF she feels low then treat as a low.

    Today, she came after lunch feeling low. CGM said 94 bg check at 89, i told them to give her a juice and a snack and as soon as she felt good to let her go back to class.

    CGM above 90 no allarm, BG above the 75 thresshold to "treat" but she did not feel well so we treat the feeling as much as the numbers said it did not need it.

    going to get her and we will see where her BG is now. after school.
     
  8. SarahKelly

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    my son is only in preK now, and his teachers are awesome about calling and going along with how he feels.
    However, we've had family members say that he's fine because of a BG check and he's crying that he feels "realllyyy looooowwww" (in his most whiney voice, a sure sign of him being low). I remind them that we have plenty of test strips and to wash hands and check again, the vast majority of the times he's been lower and then receives treatment for the low. Having the CGM has helped, but truly just asking the caregiver to let him check again if he feels low has helped to establish with Isaac that he has authority over his body and is the only one that knows how he feels at that moment.
    If in the future Isaac were repeatedly not being taken care of in a manner that I felt safe I'd build in more guidelines so that there was less questions about how to respond. For example, if his BG is below 90 and it's more than 1 hour before he'll eat than he needs to have at least 10 grams of sugar (juice box, roll of smarties, etc).
    I often forget that others aren't used to this juggling of numbers, working insulin, hormonal fluctuation, glycemic index of snacks...blah, blah, blah - that runs through my head all day. They see a number and make a decision, so I just need to help them figure out what to do with that number depending upon the time of day, previous experiences, and expected outcome. Does that make sense? (I may be rambling:) )
    Anyhow, what I am saying is don't give up on the teacher/school - I believe in most cases people want to be helpful and take care of our kiddos :)
     
  9. mmgirls

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    picked her up from school 1.5 hours later after the juice and 9carb pudding snack and she waas a nice 135.

    IF she not had those extra 24carbs she most definatly had been low, I am so thankful that my DD has most always felt her lows, even when newly Dx'd at 13 months.

    I can not imagine those that deal with kiddos that do not feel thier lows, you have a special place in my heart.
     
  10. shannong

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    My feelings exactly! I gave things a lot of thought and then had a meeting with the school where I said pretty much what you stated above. I stressed that my DS is the one who understands his body best and this needs to be listened too and responded too. My DS also told me that when he feels low and wants to test himself, the teacher will often make him wait a few minutes if she is busy doing something. Basically, I let them know that my DS needs to take care of his needs immediately and that he should not require permission to go test himself. The meeting with the school went well and one thing I realized from the meeting is that they truly had no idea how much bg's can fluctuate. As you said, they see a number and just went with that. I also came away from the meeting realizing that this is a matter of educating the people that look after my son and that I will probably be doing this for a long time. Diabetes is so complex and I suspect that people really want you to simplify things for them so that care is more straightforward. But unfortuantely, diabetes doesn't like to follow rules. And yes, I have not given up on the school. Thanks for responding, it feels great sometimes knowing there are others feeling exactly the same way.
     
  11. stewkimmom

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    I'm glad you feel good after the meeting. :D
     
  12. SarahKelly

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    what a great outcome. Bravo for going in with a positive outlook and desire to make things work ;)
     

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