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I am angry

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by brokenheart, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. brokenheart

    brokenheart Approved members

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    :)

    Any idea from the school that would involve singling out my son from his classmates angers me.

    Like last year, the school principal wanted to have my son stay at school for different activities while the whole class went to a field trip. I was mad.

    Like today, the school principal wanted to have my son take the state assessment exam 1 on 1 in a different room than his classmates. I was mad.

    Will such ideas upset you?
     
  2. mmgirls

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    Yes it would upest me, the idea of "Seperate but equal" has never worked in history, let alone when talking about children and peers.
     
  3. brokenheart

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    I had been wondering if I am being too sensitive. I am usually a very lenient person. I also think that the school principal was trying to "help", but such ideas of hers totally hurt me.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The field trip thing is inexcusable. But on the testing I can see how, if plans hadn't been put in place in advance, a well meaning principal could make such a suggestion. They have strict rules that they have to follow and she just may not have thought it through with a clear understanding of what would be the best accommodation for your son.

    Meet with her, or call her to discuss how he might be able to test with his classmates and still be able to stop if he need to attend to his diabetes. It takes planning to get this right, but I'm sure you can come up with a plan that works for him and still meets the testing rules.
     
  5. brokenheart

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    Thanks. I agree with you. I told the school that unless the principal can prove that my son has to take the exam in a different setting, he will be taking the exam in the same classroom with his classmates.
     
  6. momtozachandkay

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    The being excluded from the field trip in wrong and inexcusable but I can understand it about the testing.

    My son has it stated that he is too have small group testing for state assessments. Mostly because we have it where he is to have his BG checked before during and after testing. To keep from disrupting the class setting, we have the small group testing in place. Also, if for some reason he had other issues, like an extreme low, it would not be a distraction.

    But this is what we chose for my son and it doesn't have to be that way. In Texas, under the new state test called STAAR, there is a 4 hour limit. The small group testing helps with stopping the time for medical issues and allows him to continue without disruption in the room. Again, it doesn't have to be that way but it was a choice we made.

    It is absolutely the choice of the parents want for their students. As a teacher myself, I could see it either way.
     
  7. MomofSweetOne

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    The problem with standardized assessment is just that: they're standardized. The time is specified, and for them to stop testing for your child in the case of a high or low would take out the standardized aspect for every other child in the room because of the conversation and actions going on in the room. Ideally, the child should be tested and adjusted before the test to prevent highs or lows, but we all know diabetes doesn't always play fair or predictable. I would allow a different testing environment, but hold firm on field trips.
     
  8. brokenheart

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    If there are a few T1D kids who take the exam in a different room than the rest, that might be OK to me as well.
     
  9. mom2Hanna

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    There is testing going on right now and my daughter stays in the room but there are few kids who are in a small group room for various reasons. I'm thinking I might have her do that next yr. But the field trip thing would tick me off.
     
  10. nanhsot

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    My son thought it was a hoot that he tested in his own room, he loved it! But he's goofy that way, and really does not see himself as different in any way, so that they wanted to give him his own room just gave him a laugh.

    BUT, this was college testing, and he knew no one, so there was no sense of separation from peers, or any type of stigma, the other kids were jealous actually. I understand your anger since it's forced on him. The field trip is inexcusable and flat WRONG.

    I guess for the testing I'd give it a spin and make it a positive for him. Truth be told if he does need to stop testing to test/treat then it will be best for him to be in his own room. I'd make it a privilege in his eyes, not any sort of punishment.
     
  11. Jordansmom

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    I'd be upset about the fieldtrip, but I'm not sure what else the school can do about testing accommodations. My DD has to take all of her AP and college entrance exams separately. They have to maintain the standardization rules for the other students and at the same time make sure your child can test, treat and stop the clock. It also would not be fair to disturb other students during their testing. I just don't know how we as parents can have it both ways. Treat them the same but give them special accommodations.
     
  12. brokenheart

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    I would also shrug it off if my son is old enough.
     
  13. betty6333

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    I agree. If my son goes low or high, they cannot test him. He would be more upset because he had to leave the test for a high or low than just to do it in another room where if he needed carbs he could eat without having to disrupt the other kids. But the field trip thing would be inexcusable
     
  14. Bigbluefrog

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    Why would your child need to stay back on field trips?

    I guess I would meet with the principal and discuss it. If your child is able to why would they not go? And if it helps I would go with on the field trips to alleviate the worry or concerns for your child and teachers.

    We did some testing separate from my daughter's class because we just started pumping and needed to test frequently. The test was timed and the teacher stopped the clock for any D management. It was wonderful that they went to the trouble to help her do the testing without the worry of losing time. I can't see them stopping the clock for the whole class, that would signal out the child with diabetes.

    When we first went diagnosed, we went into the school and said what needed to be done and worked with the staff to find solutions to any problems with d management. I think we were very lucky to have a great school staff willing to work with us. I hope you too find that in your school.
     
  15. mysweetwill

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    This is our first round of standardized testing since my son's diagnosis. He is taking the exams in the regular classroom and has his meter. If he feels off or his CGM alarms, he can test and treat at his desk. If he is below 70 he will leave and the test is over for the day, he can make up that portion of the test on the school wide make up day. How his testing and treating woud effect the class hadn't even crossed my mind, shame on me I guess. But the school didnt raise it as an issue either...
     
  16. Beach bum

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    Field trip...inexcusable and discriminatory. I'd fight that one...

    Standardized testing, I could see where there would possibly be a need for separate testing (IE. if there was a time limit and they were preparing for the fact that your child would need a break for testing or restroom). However, I think I'd want to be forewarned that they would be segregated.
     
  17. Connor's Mom

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    Because we don't have our 504 yet, the principal has tested Connor separately because his blood sugar was whacko during 2 of the tests. They sent him home both days because they said if they hadn't his tests would have needed to be invalid. He honestly DID need to be sent home. He was swinging from sky high to scary low with minimal correction to the high. His emotions were a roller coaster too.

    As far as the field trip...that came up in the 504 meeting. I almost fell out of my seat when they said if something came up and I couldn't attend the trip would be cancelled!:eek: I said that such an act would be pinned on him and the other students would not be very friendly after that. They said it would be ok. Ummm no.
     
  18. MommaKat

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    This perfectly describes both my and the middle school's outlook on dd and D during state testing, and it hadn't been decided what to do until the day before the test. She did not want to be singled out, but I understood the school might have to place her in a small group setting because of the potential for stop the clock accommodations to treat a low or high.

    Her counselor came up with a wonderful idea, checked with the state, and had it cleared. In addition to testing before the assessment period, if dd felt the need to test, she'd look at the clock, write the time on her desk, and test. If she needed a snack, she'd turn to the side and eat /drink a fast acting sugar. The teacher assigned to proctor would notice this at some point, and make a notation on her exam booklet of the time she stopped and time she restarted (there's a place to notate accommodations). If dd runs out of time during a session because of D needs, the school has plans to let her make up the time lost from that session during assessment make up days.

    I thought it was a really brilliant solution and am really thankful to her counselor for the brainstorm!! :)
     
  19. dzirbel

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    Last year my daughter had to take the state testing 2 weeks after diagnosis and they gave her a choice of where she wanted to test. At first she chose a small group which was horrible. She was with some special needs kids who were very distracting and the teacher overseeing that testing group was irritated when my daughter said she needed to check her blood sugar before she started. We switched her back to her classroom for the remainder of the testing.

    At our new school the principal told me that if she feels the need to check her BG during testing they will stop the clock and let her test and treat and then resume the testing.
     
  20. Gracie'sMom

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    I agree that the testing is kind of understandable. My dd in elementary took some standardized testing in the room with the learning consultant, so if she was low and needed to check she wouldn't feel so odd. She is a very sensitive soul and doesn't like everyone staring at her:) The field trip thing, though is NOT ok.
     

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