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Hypos/Averted hypos

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by samson, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. samson

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    Just taking an informal poll: How many times a week/month do you see imminent lows you are able to avert with Dexcom, how often does your child actually dip below 80, 70 or 60, and how long do those hypos last? Also guessing age matters, so that would be helpful too.
     
  2. sszyszkiewicz

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    My kid will approach 70 at least once a day. A few times a week he will break through 70. When I go to the endo the goal is to make it so he is less than 55 1% or less of the time over the 3 month period.
     
  3. Snowflake

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    Re the "averting lows" question: I would guess 4-5 times a week. A typical scenario is a 95 straight arrow down, where we either give her 5-10 carbs of grapes or a Starburst, or we set a reduced basal for an hour. These strategies are usually but not always successful in heading off the low.

    As far as excursions into the 60s, on an average week, she probably has 3 to 4, but we do have some crazy weeks where that number is more like 10 to 12. You are so right that age matters. When she was younger and completely hypo unaware, her lows came on harder and faster, and she frequently had lows in the 40s and 50s. These days, it's big news in our house if she has a number under 60 -- I would guess it's less than once a month now (thank goodness!!!)

    On your final question, how long do her lows last: good question, I don't think I can answer. Some seem more intractable than others, and the Dexcom seems to be faster at showing the rise at some times than others.
     
  4. rgcainmd

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    We don't consider anything higher than 61 a low...
     
  5. Snowflake

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    I think the original poster's child is very young, in preschool if I recall. Extremely tight control to that degree is dangerous in very young kids for a lot of reasons, including hypo unawareness and less accuracy of CGM.
     
  6. mikegl31

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    My son is 7 and we definitely go through different stretches. Over the summer, there was a week were he dipped into the 50s at least once everyday. Other weeks we may hit the 60s a few times. As you know, its really difficult with all of the activity. It is somewhat (vaguely) predictable, but sometimes we even take advanced steps to help prevent a low, and he still drops low. The delay in the Dex makes it difficult sometimes. Once he hits 90 with a down arrow, I would bet he is in the 60s. Sometimes he feels them, other times he doesn't.
     
  7. samson

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    yes, it (seems) impossible to get truly "tight" control with our son. Our range is 80 to 180, but aiming for those targets is basically what keeps our son above 60 and below 220 most of the time.
     
  8. sszyszkiewicz

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    Just FYI, and I dont know how long you have been at this, but yesterday my son ranged from a high of 220 to a low of 51 (after an afternoon of soccer). With T1D the swings are more likely than not simply because

    1) we cannot really time the insulin very well
    2) we do not have an accurate way to measure all of the things that can affect blood sugar one way or the other.

    So its like driving a car with the windshield blacked out and you have to make decisions about the direction of the car using only the rear view mirror. It works great when the road is straight and there is nothing in the way, but there are inevitable curves and you get variations.

    So we keep them safe as best we can. The CGM gives better visibility.

    The point is, don't beat yourself up too much.
     
  9. Snowflake

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    Well put! This has been our experience too. You and your endo team will surely gradually tighten the targets as he grows up. We started at 100-200, then spent two years at 80-180, and have only recently moved to 70-150, which felt momentous! We were already micro-bolusing above 150, but it's somehow different to see it made "official" on the care plan.

    My daughter use to be totally hypo unaware, but has for the past year been feeling about half of her lows, and even more, feeling drops. She sometimes seems to feel a 75 double down at least as much she does a steady 50. Assuming your child feels his lows, that factors in, too -- it's not just about achieving safe numbers and good control, but also making sure DD isn't spending part of every day feeling yucky.
     
  10. samson

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    My son is 2.5 and definitely does feel some lows -- assuming he's not been running low too often. But he will often ignore the feeling if he's watching a cartoon or doing something more important like bashing his brother over the head.
     
  11. susanlindstrom16

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    Well you do have to have priorities, right? haha. My daughter is pretty tuned into her lows. I think one of the best things with getting a cgm is now we know if we need to treat something in the 70s or is we can just leave it be. My biggest issue is that I tend to overtreat the low lows bc I get all panicky when its telling me "urgent low" even if we have already treated. My husband is much better at keeping calm and waiting for it to come up.
     

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