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How full is your D Bag?

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by MyBoys'Mom, Apr 22, 2011.

  1. emm142

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    I don't have a special D bag. I fill my pump reservoir with 140U Novorapid (enough for 3 days) at once, using a pen cartridge, so when I fill it for the first time I put the cartridge with 160U left back in my back, and after I fill it the second time I put the cartridge with 20U left back in my bag. That way, I always have some fast acting insulin for an emergency. I don't carry a spare site most of the time, because I'd just give myself a bit of fast acting with the pen every hour in case of emergency.

    Other than the pen, I carry my meter and glucose tabs. Sometimes glucose gel. And glucagon. I never used to carry glucagon, but I told my friends about its existence and all of a sudden they all wanted to learn - so six of my best friends are now glucagon trained, and there is a point to carrying it around with me. Since I'm hypo unaware mostly, it does make me more comfortable to have it with me, just in case.
     
  2. Scribe

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    There is no wrong answer to this question. You carry what you need to deal with physical and clinical needs and, more importantly, to satisfy your emotional well being.

    That said ... for work (which often runs from 8:30 am until 7:30 pm on a normal day and often until 11 pm or later), I carry my meter and my lunch. I have one site change in my desk that has been untouched for 5 years.

    For trips ... I carry one meter, one extra canister of strips, an open vial of insulin and one extra, and one extra reservoir and site change.

    I do not have a bag. I stick whatever I need into my backpack that I carry to work every day.
     
  3. emm142

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    Just wondering, do you not get lows, or do you always just buy something to treat them with? (I suppose before morning you could eat something from your lunch, but after lunch..) I completely agree that we need to carry whatever will satisfy our diabetes needs, but I can't imagine being able to skip the fast acting glucose.
     
  4. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    back up pump
    back up meter
    6 infusion sets
    3 resevoirs
    2 bottles test strips
    Frio with enough insulin for 2 weeks
    glucose tabs
    meal bars
    water
    alcohol and cotton balls
    batteries for pumps and metes

    I carry the smaller bag with the sets and resevoiirs with me if it's hot outsud because the tapes will lose the stickiness with the heat of the car.
    We also live in earthquake country, so the water and bars are for both of us
     
  5. Scribe

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    Sure. In fact, I'm perfectly happy to wake up between 60-75. Lows don't bother me and yes, I feel them early and accurately. I will do anything to avoid highs, which I define as anything over 150.
    If I'm 45 I don't always treat right away; I know I'm trending low but if I'm interviewing somebody I'll finish and then have a granola bar. I honestly don't know what a fast carb is (though I can guess); no endo has ever mentioned the term in 50 plus years.
     
  6. C6H12O6

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    Well that could mean the endos you have encountered respect your D knowledge enough to assume you would know.

    Fast carbs denotes a food item that is easily and quickly metabolized to glucose in the blood stream.

    I think granola bars are an okay choice depending on the brand and the ingredients. (But I think a lot of ppl would say not ideal)Some people have mentioned the individually sealed rice krispie treats as being a good choice.

    Glucose tabs are most practical for treating lows if you are looking to consume the fewest calories in the process of treating a low.

    this provides a pretty comprehensive list of fast acting carbs http://www.bcchildrens.ca/NR/rdonlyres/5A86081E-411F-423D-B09A-DAD44A15B013/46009/hypoglycemia.pdf

    Has your low treatment choice evolved over the years ? Were granola bars the hot item they are today in 1960 ?
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
  7. MyBoys'Mom

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    So, I'm hijacking my own thread :D (I hope that's OK).

    Emm's quote got me thinking...

    So, you just fill your pump reservior with a pen cartridge? That's just cool! I hate having to give DS insulin with a syringe when he's lost a set (like, right after swimming, etc.). We use emla because we use silhouettes, so our set changes are something we do at home when all is calm.

    Do you just get a prescription for pens instead of vials? Your insurance company is OK with that? How do you fill your reservoirs?

    Thanks!!!!!!
     
  8. emm142

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    I'm in the UK, so no insurance companies, but I just get cartridges rather than vials through the national health service.. No questions were asked, obviously they might ask you about it, but I've certainly heard of people in the US filling reservoirs from pen cartridges, so it must be possible (it's particularly good for kids who would have loads of insulin left in a vial after it had been open for a month).

    There are two ways I've used to fill reservoirs using penfill cartridges. The first is to push all air from the reservoir and then connect it to the cartridge (using the blue thing on the MM reservoir) and just pull back the plunger on the reservoir to pull insulin from the cartridge. Then remove bubbles, etc. It all works great, as long as you don't squirt air into the cartridge (if you do that, the orange stopper will fly off the end and insulin will go everywhere).

    The second way is to push all the air from the reservoir and then put the cartridge inside an insulin pen (Novopen or Novopen Jr.). Connect the pen to the blue thing, and use the actual pen to inject insulin into the reservoir (dial up the insulin and squirt it in). Remove bubbles, etc.

    Personally, the second way is my favourite. I find I get less bubbles that way, but I don't know why that would be. It is really useful to have the cartridges to carry around, though, and I also would have insulin left in a vial after a month of use, which I'd have to throw away.
     
  9. Jen_in_NH

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    If we're just going out around town, I have a camera case with his PDM, strips, lancets, and alcohol preps. I have a few juice boxes and crackers in the car for him.

    If we're going farther away, or for a whole day, we have a small zippered bag with 2 new pods, novolog, syringes, glucagon, spare batteries, his ketone meter, and stickers. Stickers make pods hurt less :)
    Right now, it's easy to carry everything. He's 3, so he has a backpack we bring everywhere with changes of clothes, his entire toy collection that he NEEDS to have with him (per him, not me :rolleyes:) I imagine it will be a bit more of a trick to keep everything together with him when he gets a bit older.
     
  10. Our3girls

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    I have to agree that we all do things differently and that none of the ways are right or wrong.
    I guess it does benefit to have a girl in this situation because she carries a purse most of the time anyways. She has glucogon, fruit strips that are great for a fast acting carb, small container of glucose tabs and her meter which also has a few fruit strips in the front pocket and hand wipes. At school she has extra sites and all that stuff. I have fast acting treat, an extra site, site prep, resevoir and syringe, strips in my purse and DH has extra site, syringes, strips and fast acting in his truck. I am sure
    This is just for in town running errands. If we go out of town I take multiple sites, resevoirs..., insulin, syringes, fast acting and other treats, extra meter way too many strips and ketone meter, extra glucogon kit in a small back pack that typically has other stuff like sun block, hand sanitizer, other kids stuff, water- you know kid stuff :)
    Honestly if you did not know D affected our family and looked through any of our vehicles or mine and my dd's old purses you would scratch your head :) With lancets and syringes and wipes and ... we joke about it regularly :)
     
  11. Teacups

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    My ds wears a spibelt in which fits his Contour USB meter, small poker and test strip vial. Insulin and a few syringes fit too. He has a small change pouch that he clips to his belt w/ a few coins and 3-4 tabs.

    If he's w/ a parent we carry the crackers, glucagon, Calorie King, juice etc.

    If he's heading off on his own he has an extra supply kit that he grabs with those bulkier items. He currently uses a small insulated lunch box for that stuff.

    :)
     
  12. MySweethearts

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    My son uses a sling small backpack my DH got on a trip for his job. We have glucagon in a small bag w/pen needles, wet ones, snack, sugar tabs, his meter case, juice box (when out longer than an hour) hand wipes. I try to keep it easy to move his items quickly if I need to put them in my purse. Also, if I know we will probably be longer than an hour...a small cooler that I found at babys r us with his insulin and a cool pack. So I carry a large tote w/me because usually I end up putting the bag in my tote..lol
     
  13. sammysmom

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    Sam's small sling kit bag that he carries has his meter, one site, insulin pen candy and an emergency $10 bill. Thats it!
     
  14. Tigerlilly's mom

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    That emergency $10 bill wouldn't last long in my sons bag!! ;) UNLESS I didn't tell him it was there!:p
     
  15. sammysmom

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    It only goes with him when he goes out with another family member or friends family! HA HA, no way would I send it with him just for going around the corner! LOL
     

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