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How does your child act while high?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by nanhsot, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    We're definitely seeing patterns here, my son is more rude and ill tempered when high. I haven't seen this talked about like what to expect with lows.

    I've heard a few others chime in that they see this as well.

    What behavior do you see when high?
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Last edited: Jan 9, 2011
  3. Lisa P.

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    Well, you know the phrase, "you're getting on my nerves"? I think of that a lot when Selah is high, since her nervous system (and brain and eyes) are getting flooded with unwanted glucose.

    On both sides of our diagnosis Selah was high a lot, she would yell and cry at the top of her lungs in grocery stores. Besides the Murphy's Law effect, I think the stress of having to be doing a task combined with the overstimulation in a grocery store (Walmart was the worst -- ever stop in Walmart and just listen to how many children are screaming? :eek:) really got to her. People would give me the MEANNEST looks, I never knew exactly what they were thinking. I don't know if they thought I'd slapped her, or if they thought I should have slapped her. I suspect it was a mix of both -- what did you DO to that child from some and will you SHUT that child UP from others. I still resent it.

    She is more even when she's high now, but it's still a strong difference. What I also see is that when she's in range for several days her overall mood is much better. With the CGMS, I noticed that her behavior started changing above 180 (previously I'd assumed 250 would push her to cranky). It's motivated us to avoid highs more when previously it was lows we were afraid of, because she clearly doesn't feel good over 200.
     
  4. Mel

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    Thank you so much for posting this! It's a relief to know we're normal. We've noticed that when our little guy's bs is within range, he's an angel. Too high or too low and oh dear... DH took him to the park and he had a complete meltdown; turned out he was super low. Then here at the house he'll start throwing things and yelling; when I check him he'll be upper 200s. Before diagnosis we thought he was just being a brat. Now we know it's all about his levels.

    And now when DH starts acting like a brat I want to feed him... or make him hydrate. :p
     
  5. Beach bum

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    Cranky
    Lethargic
    Headaches
    Tired

    She's getting better at controlling her emotions, though some days we see her lovely un-censored self (this morning to be exact).
     
  6. Mel

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    Does it get any easier as they get older and are able to communicate how they are feeling? And when they're older, how can you tell the difference between a high and them just being a normal teenager?
     
  7. mandapanda1980

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    When dd is high we notice

    Crabby
    Irritable
    Whiney
    Tired(legs too tired to walk)
    Thirsty
    Frequent bathroom visits/accidents(can't get pants down fast enough)

    Biggest is thirst. If dd asks for a drink multiple times ill check her. More often than not she's 250+
     
  8. teresao

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    When our son is high he seems to talk nonstop and be argumentative. He also will complain that his legs hurt if we are out shopping or he has to walk anywhere. He is pretty good at noticing lows, but sometimes says he feels low when and we check and he is high.
     
  9. Tuff

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    Mine acts exactly like all of the above. I guess it's good to know that it's a pretty standard reaction to a high. It makes you realize that these kids must all feel like crap to have them acting that way:(
     
  10. chbarnes

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    The problem is, with highs and lows, your kid can become uncooperative when you really need them to cooperate with a correction or site change.
     
  11. nanhsot

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    Well, my son has only had diabetes as a teenager, so I can't really comment on if it gets easier as they get older, but I think this is part of why I wanted to verify what I was finding in my own home. I was blaming a lot of behavior on normal teenager-ness when in fact it's been high blood sugars.

    I think knowing your kid well helps, and any change in normal behavior should be looked at as a possible blood sugar connection.

    My son has been having a lot more moodiness and when I pay attention, it's definitely linked to high sugar. Not that it excuses the rudeness and doesn't make it OK, but it does help me approach it differently and not get as personally involved. Gives me a bit of a different outlook, so to speak.
     
  12. Butterfly Betty

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    Whether Sophie is low or High, I've noticed that she gets really cranky; screaming, yelling, picking fights about nothing. She's tired, and complains about her stomach hurting. Also, when she is low, she gets really pale and when she's high she tends to get redder in the face.
     
  13. Lisa P.

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    I've tried to approach it as if Selah had a fever of 104 when she's high (because I've had a fever of 104 and know how I felt). Whatever I'd expect of her when she's feverish is what I'd expect of her when she's high. So, no slugging you sister even if you feel like cr@p. But whatever I'd cut her some slack on if she were feverish I'll cut her slack on when she's high. Like if she falls into whining or has a hard time concentrating or gets loud.
     
  14. LJM

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    Mean, rude, cranky. Horrible, really.
     
  15. LJM

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    I have to say that I think the noticeable impact of the highs have been worse since he turned 13, though...
     
  16. tsoccer5

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    yes! cranky, and sometimes just mean!

    she fights everything and everyone


     
  17. Bigbluefrog

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    With really high bg, my 14 yr old gets emotional, moody, and cries easily.

    Increased frustration, and difficulty concentrating, completely unaware of her bg being high.

    That being said she is aware of lows, because her body sends a hungry signal to her brain. If that awareness was not there, we would need to get a cgms.

    As soon as we correct the high, she becomes more level headed.
     
  18. Heather(CA)

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    Short tempered and Cranky. Seth rarely acts like that so any time he behaves this way I tell him to test, he HATES it but he's almost always high;)
     
  19. joan

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    The one thing my son hates more than anything else about having d is that people (family and friends) sometimes blame his behavior on being high. He has a fit if we ask him to check his bs when he is acting hyper or angry. If his bs is normal he is really, really mad.
     
  20. stevecu

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    Early on, some of our worst nights (emotionally) were trying to deal with highs while ds was dealing with his new reality.

    Very cranky, very irritable, very argumentative.

    We had a couple of nights struggling to bring down a high while ds tried to refuse the needle.

    Now he usually sleeps through his highs.
     

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