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How do you handle?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Arctic Stamp Queen, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. Arctic Stamp Queen

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    Background is that my son was diagnosed in 1/12, so we are only 3 months into this. He is 12 years old and feels like his life has drastically changed. My husband and I are trying to raise him so that he sees that, yes, he has some additional challenges, but in life we all have challenges, this is just his particular challenge.

    Logging has been a HUGE issue, so I bought a Telcare monitor that automatically uploads his BG to an online spreadhseet for me and I can access his numbers immediately from my phone.

    A few times, when we have been discussing his numbers while at school, I have caught that the number he tells me is different from the number on the computer. I chalked it up to faulty memory and went on.

    But yesterday his school nurse called me to say that my son had lied to her and told her his number was 128 when in fact it was 228. We both suspect it is because he did not want to take his correction shot, he still hates the shots. But the fact is, he lied. I asked her to have him call me at lunch and he couldn't give me a reason why...so I took his xbox away for a few days for lieing and told him he would have to work on earning trust back with both the nurse and his father and I.

    Today, the nurse calls me to tell me that the principal came and talked to her yesterday and said that he our son throw out his lunch and go buy an ice cream bar...I am sure that was why his number was high.

    The nurse is telling me this is normal rebellious behavior for a newly diagnosed kiddo his age...but I am just saddened and at a loss. Ideas and advice welcomed. Is this normal?
     
  2. KRenee

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    I think it is very normal - his feeling that his life has changed drastically (it has!) and trying to avoid pain.

    To eat ice cream instead of lunch is somewhat expected, just stress to your son that he needs to take insulin for whatever he eats. Especially at first, he needs to feel free to eat what everyone else does, just teach him to count carbs.

    Think about getting a pump as soon as possible. My dd was very sensitive to shots - made her arms ache all the time. She is now so glad that we finally got a pump. And your son can learn to dose himself so that he doesn't have to go to the nurse.

    I don't know if I would punish for lying about his BG. I get the part about lying, but this condition is his to live with. Think about instilling in him a desire to take care of himself and be as healthy as possible. Don't make this about obeying Mom/Dad/Nurse - make it about doing the right thing for him for the long haul.
     
  3. Arctic Stamp Queen

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    We are getting set up for a saline trial for a pump and are hoping to begin pumping by the end of May...He is motivated by that because he seriously hates the shots.

    I'm trying to do as much of this with him as I can, I even let him give me a saline shot in the stomach (he really enjoyed that...almost too much), so that I can empathize with him. But I know it's not the same and that he is the only one TRULY experiencing this. I wish I could take it from him...it breaks my heart.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    what size needle are you using? They may not have written your prescription for the thinest gauge which is 30 or 31.
     
  5. Timmy Mac

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    I know that the lying is wrong, but how do you and the nurse react if your son's bloodsugar is high? I know I used to lie about my numbers because I didn't want to see everyone freak out.


    and at least he didn't eat the icecream AND lunch, then his bloodsugar would be MUCH higher.
     
  6. Arctic Stamp Queen

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    When his BG is high we just ask him how many units he needs to take to correct and if he needs figuring it out we help we help him. It's not a big deal to us...truly. We accept it for what it is and move on.

    LOL on eating the lunch AND the ice cream. He tells me he is hungry all the time, and I know he is growing, so that is on my list to address at our next doctors appointment. The realist in me gets it, the mom in me is like...but ICE CREAM is not going to fill you up.
     
  7. momof2greatkids

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    My daughter went through a brief period a couple of months ago where she lied to us and the nurse about testing and what her blood sugars were. When we found out, she said it was because she didn't want to stop what she was doing to test, and she didn't want to tell the nurse if she was high because she didn't want to have to test for ketones.

    She had to show us, and the nurse at school, her meter after testing each time for awhile. We had a long discussion with her about why testing was so important (especially before bed!), and how we use the numbers to adjust her basal and I:C ratios, and how it could be dangerous if we were basing the adjustments on incorrect information.

    We didn't punish her since it was the first time it had happened, but let her know that if it happened again, that she would be punished because of the potential danger that she would be putting herself in.

    I had heard about teens rebelling and not testing/lying about numbers, but was shocked when Audrey did it. She's always seemed to take D in stride, so it caught us off guard - plus I had thought if she rebelled it would be a few years into it in her later teens. I don't think its that uncommon, and it wouldn't surprise me if it happens again over the next few years.
     
  8. pianoplayer4

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    I know its hard, and most parents deny that they do this... but you react....

    I mean when a kids bg is high, their is a reaction, and its not a good one. It's hard not to react, but its important to try your hardest (and all parents do it) In all honesty the times I have wanted to lie about my number (I never have) it was because I didn't want to tell my mom is was high, because I felt I had screwed up, or she would be mad, or I didn't feel like answering all the questions that come with a high.

    I would remind your son that its just a number, not a grade. Also it might help to get him hanging out with other type one kids, on here, or Facebook (not sure if he has one) or in your community, but I know for me a real turning point in my attitude was when I connected with people who live with what I live with, people who always understand.
     
  9. caspi

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    I know you are upset that your son lied to you, but please don't take it personally. Put yourself in your son's shoes - he's 12. Recently diagnosed. Hates shots. So given the choice between telling the truth or fudging his #'s to avoid a shot, he chose the latter. Is it right? Of course not. But is it understandable at his age? I think so.

    The sooner you can get your son pumping, I think the better. It will give him more flexibility. :cwds:
     
  10. Arctic Stamp Queen

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    Pump trial appt!

    The DEC called me back today and we are set up for our Saline Pump Trial! Our appointment is this Friday at noon. I am so excited and hoping that this will be succesfull for Seth so that we can begin the pump paperwork! He is nervous about the insertion, we are doing this so that he can see how it feels before we are committed. :)
     
  11. caspi

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    That is great news! Good luck and let us know how he does!! :)
     
  12. Joretta

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    My dd was 13 at diagnosis and I think you did right to punish for lying. You showed him diabetes did not change your family ethics. As for the ice cream switch when he blouses to after lunch. Set up an adult to help monitor the truth of what he eats until you can trust him to be honest. Also definitely get him pumping.
     
  13. bnmom

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    It's a tough age. Great news on the pump - it eliminates the temptation for them for fudge things in order to skip a shot. Yay!

    If he wants to pull an ice cream switch, I'd just play it off and remind him to adjust his dose if needed. Although it's not what we'd prefer, an ice cream lunch for a teenager isn't that big a stretch. I know I went all through freshman year of high school having a bear claw and pop for lunch every day :p
     
  14. kpoehls

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    The pump does not solve all of the problems with diabetes. I don't mean to be negative, just realistic. It makes getting the insulin less painful, but the process of counting carbs, and remembering to bolus and test still remain.

    If your son is experiencing other problems (beyond the pain of shots) with adjusting to life with D, I would encourage you to not assume that the pump will automatically make everything better.
     
  15. Arctic Stamp Queen

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    We are 24 hours into the Saline trial.

    Just wanted to address a few of the points made above:

    I did punish the lying because to me and our family it is a moral ethical thing that we want to nip in the bud.

    The nurse did suggest changing the time he injects for his lunch from before to after. Seth is very happy about this since he can now trade with friends. I hate that...but it doesn't seem worth the fight if it keeps him on track and he is honest about what he eats...the numbers will tell. I too remember eating a chocolate chip cookie and a soda for lunch and thinking I was so grown up at that age...blergh.

    I know the pump will not fix all the problems, but he is starting to see that it easy to just input the BG number and the carb number and pump takes care of the rest. Yesterday he was saying he thought he would stay on the shots...today he is really liking the pump and the fact that he can see the potential for snacking and things that are MUCH harder to do while on MDI. As a matter of fact, he has taken over the input in the pump (with my supervision, we talk about numbers to input) versus me doing it yesterday...I see this as progress.

    :)
     

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