- advertisement -

How do you get a child to be more open?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Boo, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Boo

    Boo Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    1,958
    My 10-year old son has been a type 1 diabeteic for almost 2 years. He is very private about it. He will only test in front of his family and 2 closest friends. He is quite mature on most accounts, but gets all "wigged out" when it comes to handling his diabetes in front of other people. As far as I'm concerned, the more of his friends that know, the better...you never know when one of them might need to help him. I don't want to torture him, and have therefore never spoken to his class, but I wish I had done so when he was first diagnosed. It seems to me that it makes it worse to hide it (kids always ask the nurse why he is there so often, etc.). I don't think it would be a big deal once everyone knows. Any advice on getting your child to open up to classmates? I'd be particularly interested in responses from other children and teens. Thanks!
     
  2. Hollyb

    Hollyb Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,056
    Hi,

    I wonder if it would help him to hear from my son. Aaron isn't really interested in diabetes forums, but he remembers how much it helped him to get a visit from an older diabetic boy (friend of his cousin's) in hospital so maybe he'd like to pass it on.

    This occurs to me because he's 13 and just diagnosed in September, but very open about it. We told his class what was going on before he went back to school, and he took his first school injection sitting at his desk at lunchtime with a crowd of onlookers. He's tested/injected in restaurants, in the lobby of theaters, backstage with his band before performances, at sleepover parties, in ski lodges, and he really doesn't care who sees.

    Heading as he is into high school next year where he'll meet a bunch of new kids, I'm really grateful that he is this unselfconscious.

    Anyway, if you'd like him to post something about this to you (or your son directly), let me know and I'll ask him.
     
  3. Boo

    Boo Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2006
    Messages:
    1,958
    Thank you, Hollyb. Though I am really grateful for the offer, I suspect it won't mean as much to just see words on the screen. But feel free to ask your son what he thinks and post a response! I'll certainly have him read it, and who knows, maybe someday somebody will actually be able to convince him that it is okay to tell people! I think we need to find a local support group or ADA chapter or something to get more involved with so that he comes in contact with more diabetic kids on a regular basis.
     
  4. Hollyb

    Hollyb Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,056
    Yeah, that might help more. Now that I think of it, a really good friend of mind has a young adult daughter who has had diabetes since she was 12, so Aaron has sort of grown up hearing periodic news of Rosie and occasionally visiting there. Maybe that made it seem a bit more normal for him when it happened...
     
  5. Sweetkidmom

    Sweetkidmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Diabetic camps and support group meetings really helped normalise things for my daughter; especially the camps where they would all wake up at night to test together. Sitting at support group meetings (I drive to our nearest town to attend one) she got to see other kids being tested and injecting while the talk was going on and that really got it through, that it was not a big deal that had to be hidden. Try and get him together with as many other diabetic children as you can find.

    Good luck
    Kay
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice