- advertisement -

How do you deal with mornings?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by BCmom, Nov 24, 2010.

  1. HanksMom

    HanksMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2010
    Messages:
    159
    Chris - I believe that what you suggested was with good intent, and I appreciate your follow-up response. I still stand by wishing that you chose words other than "scary" because I think that's a pretty loaded word, at least to me, who is still scared about everything I do.

    That said, I have no intent in derailing the OP's original question. She asked for help in dealing with corrections at night, and my comment interrupted that process. Let's get back to the issue at hand.

    Agree to disagree and still be D family?
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    I used that word only because that was the word the OP used. But yes, let's not derail the thread. Thank you. And again, sorry if I offended you. :cwds:
     
  3. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    No teen should be running high all night out of fear that corrections will cause unacceptable lows.

    The normal day-time Correction Factor may need to be reduced - by 25%, 50% or even 75%. But at some % reduction it should be possible to give night corrections, and I think it is important that these be given if a teen is high at bedtime and not coming down. It's a matter of trial and error (and lots of night-testing) to find out the %reduction which will work best.

    At our end we find a 50% reduction in the Correction Factor works well. So where 1 unit will drop DD by about 80 points during the day, we correct on the assumption that it will drop her by 160 points at night and dose accordingly on nights when she's high.

    I should note we ALWAYS test on nights when she has gotten a correction.
     
  4. BCmom

    BCmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Messages:
    731
    Thank-you everyone...

    Christopher, you are right to push me out of my comfort zone. I feel like such a nube, or like a scared rodent. I find it difficult to reason well when I haven't slept. How do you all manage the night checks and still function?:)

    Hanksmom, thank-you so much for giving me permission to be frightened, I really needed your comforting words.

    Em doesn't wake high everyday. When I posted this thread originally she had been high in the mornings for about 4 days and I was tired and at my wits end. Yes I am terrified to think what it is doing to her body:eek:, and I try very hard not to transmit that fear to her. She has now started her menses for the very first time and her numbers have settled down again. I do check at night but never seem to catch the weird numbers:confused:. But I don't check every night either.

    Because of puberty Ems numbers seem to bounce all over the place at times. Sometimes we get several weeks of steady numbers... just long enough to feel comfortable and then bang, it seems to ping pong around for a bit. Often with scary lows too:eek: (I am sorry I used the scary word again).

    Why can't D just have a written manual. Inject here, press start.:)

    Anyways, what I was trying to get info on, is not how to prevent highs in the morning because we usually manage to or not if it was unpredicted, but how do you deal with the highs that just happen?
    When they do, I give her an injection and send her on her way with breakfast in hand to eat once her numbers are better... But what do you do? Or does that never happen to you? Do you check every night to make sure they never have a high in the morning? Or is it just my Child that has weird numbers:confused:. Gosh I feel inept again. I wish I could resign, reason given? Unqualified to be a D mother.
     
  5. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    As one of those parents that are afraid of the night, and with good reason, I STILL correct. It is important to the health of my child.

    I know while on shots, we had an adjusted nighttime correction scale. I am posting what our scale looked like - this is for my child and based on her insulin needs. It should be used as an example only. But it will give you some idea of nighttime corrections when talking to the doctor:
    View attachment 2463
     
  6. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    We test at every meal and major snack. Like everyone we see plenty of highs.

    If DD's high then we take a deep breath, cover the carbs, and add a correction to the bolus and get on with our day.. :cwds:
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Well, for starters, you're definitely not "unqualified" to be a D mother. ;) I mean, we're all pretty crap compared to a pancreas, but that's a pretty lofty standard to measure yourself against. :p

    At this point, we have the luxury of a CGM, so most of the time we are "warned" of a high before he wakes with one, and we can deal with it before breakfast. Before we had the CGM, I'd have my husband check him when he got up (typically around 5:30) so that we could deal with any highs then. I would probably worry about it less on weekends at this point than on school days.

    Night checks STINK, but for us, at least, if he starts the day off high, it typically doesn't get any better from there. Either he stays high the whole day, or we get a cycle of highs and lows that aren't any fun either. As I said before, if he's with me all day, like on the weekend, I can keep an eye on things, and usually straighten it out. But at school...we have a great nurse, and it's still a crapshoot if he eats above 140 or so.

    That all being said, some days they're going to be high at wakeup, and you do the best you can do. We typically try to convince him to have a low-carb breakfast (eggs, bacon, maybe a half piece of toast) so that we don't compound the problem, but there's not much more you really can do. :eek:

    ETA: While everyone is talking about night corrections, I thought I'd add that Jack's daytime correction factor is around 100. From 8pm until midnight it's actually around 80, and then from midnight to 5am or so, it's 150. It interestingly follows his basal needs, but I don't know if that's coincidence or not.
     
  8. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    That is a really interesting observation.. :cwds:
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I find it really odd that someone with a few weeks of D under her belt and a few dozen posts on CWD would post something so aggressive and obnoxious to a long time poster's helpful and thoughtful post.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2010
  10. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    I can ditto that - I was shocked.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Actually, she didn't. And D with an toddler is not the same as D with a tween. Just as I, parent of a 12 year old dxd at 4, would not impose my experience on those with tiny ones, I expect that those with babes wouldn't suggest that their experience is relevant to a tween's.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I really dislike it when people post and then delete their posts. It serves no one, it just confuses everyone. :rolleyes:
     
  14. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    What about we try to post about OP's question?! :cwds:
     
  15. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    That's what "people" were doing when they were interrupted.:rolleyes: The OP was given good advice, yet others felt compelled to disrupt the conversation and call into question the advice provided. It was reasonable to support the advice given and to ask the disrupters to desist. :cwds:
     
  16. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    And what has your contribution to the discussion of the OP's question been?
     
  17. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    4,925
    I want to point out the difference here in daytime and night time corrections isn't a percentage or a correction factor, it's the number being corrected down for. It's still assuming 1 unit lowers blood sugar 50 points (ISF=50) but the daytime chart aims to get blood sugar down to the 125-149 range and the night time chart aims to get blood sugar down to the 175-199 range.

    Aiming for higher numbers but using the same correction factor is something I do at nights if I'm not wearing a sensor.
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I didn't need to chime in because Christopher had already offered the advice that I would have ... really Wilf, do you really feel the need to be paternalistic always??
     
  19. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    what about you try and take your own advice? Just a thought.

    If you really feel the need to be so paternalistic, why not do it in a PM. It has two benefits. 1. it does not derail the thread, and 2. it means less people have to be exposed to your behavior.
     
  20. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    We deal with mornings by intervening in the night if necessary, so that we start the day with our best foot forward.. :cwds:
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice