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How do you and your tweens handle Field Day?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by DsMom, Jun 4, 2012.

  1. DsMom

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    My 8 year old just had field day on Friday. It was really only half a day, after lunch. We had under-bolused him at lunch, anticipating the activity, and I set a lowered temp basal. This worked well last year. It wasn't enough, however, because when I checked him about 40 minutes into the activities, he was 70.

    Only you guys will understand how torn I was.:( No way did I want him to stop having fun and taking part with his classmates. Luckily, the next activity was low energy...just playing with a parachute...so I lowered his basal rate some more, and stood there popping glucose tabs in his mouth. Twenty minutes later..while he yelled at me to hurry up and test him...71.:( So, while he stood in line for a relay race, he downed a juice box. I was determined not to stop him unless he went below 70. Happily, he started to go up...119...and then it was almost over and we managed to keep him playing while not dipping too low.

    Got me wondering how parents with older kids manage field day. I'm sure teens that have a "Gym Night" or whatever it is called at your school do their own management...but what about 12/13 year olds in middle school? Do you go to their field days? Leave it up to them? When we get to that point, I don't want to be a helicopter parent and embarrass him, but of course need him to be safe. As always, hearing your experiences really help me to plan for how to handle things later!:)
     
  2. Mish

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    uggh. I hate field day for the very reasons you've mentioned. Usually we just go with a lowered basal for the day and a scheduled series of granola bar snacks. Sometimes we end up a bit higher than I'd like but he's having fun, he's not stopping every 5 min to check, and most of all, he avoids going low and having to sit out a good deal of the day.

    All that said, we have 3 "spree day" situations coming up over the next 2 weeks. One is the actual spree day, but then we also have 6th grade cookout where they do lots of outdoor activities like relay races, sack races, etc and the other is a 2 mile walkathon to raise money for some silliness which the PTO determines these little snowflakes just MUST have. We're leaving this school at the end of the year so I am not ashamed to say that I'm just letting him stay home that day since it is sandwiched right between the other two events. (don't even get me started, these kids haven't had a real day of school now in a week. Tomorrow is field trip. On a boat. In the middle of actual water. )
     
  3. manda81

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    We had our first Field Day with D this year, and we used gatorade. They were all supposed to bring water bottles (it's hot in Texas!) and we had Brody sip on it periodically. We didn't change any basal or anything, and it worked out very well.

    Our nurse also attends Field Day, and will in Middle School as well, but I will likely always go until he begs me not to (and I trust him to handle it!). The nurse was busy with someone who broke their ankle this year, so I was glad I was there!
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I've found that the tween desire to keep mom at bay is a profoundly powerful motivator for self-care :rolleyes:.

    By middle school we had a deal. I'd back off, if she'd step up. Now, at 14, she knows as much as I do about balancing food and exercise and insulin, and she has the added advantage of knowing what she feels her body doing with all that exercise and insulin and food. ;)
     
  5. quiltinmom

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    At age 8 it's hard to imagine trusting them for a whole day. But, at least for us, slowly but surely he has been able to take care of himself. The last field day he had I couldn't go so I just had to drill into him everything he had to do and send him off. (I didn't tell him how nervous I was.) It all turned out fine. Just the other day ds came home and told me about an ice cream party at school that I had no idea about. He was chuckling about how many carbs it was. When he checked his blood it was fine so it seems he did a great job. I was so proud of him for doing everything right.

    I guess my point is that you have to trust them sometime. Not necessarily at age 8, but when you and your Cwd are ready you'll know. I'm guessing most 12-13 year olds would not like mom tagging along. :)
     
  6. Daddyto4

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    I don't image we could have done any better than you did in this situation. I assume you checked his blood sugar before he started?
     
  7. Butterfly Betty

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    We actually unhooked her pump for playday. We'd been noticing the lows due to all the extra activities for a while before playday came around, so I made the decision to just unhook her pump for the 1 1/2 hours they were playing. It worked for us, but that's not to say it would have for you. I think you handled it well, and now you can bank this for experience next time.
     
  8. Christopher

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    Your 8 year old clearly needed you there and it sounds like you did a great job. By the time your 8 year old is a tween/teen, I have a feeling (as others have said) that he will be managing on his own for that day.

    Danielle (13) just had her field day and we barely even talked about it, except for me to say, be safe and have fun. Well, actually, I think the conversation went something like this:



    Me: Danielle, you have field day tomorrow, do you know how you are going to handle it?

    Her: *eyes rolling* Yes Daaad. Jeeeze.

    Me: OK OK, I just want to make sure you are safe and have fun.

    Her: *Dramatic Sigh* I KNOW Dad, it will be fine. Trust Me!

    Me: OK OK......
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    My son is 8 and we don't go to school for field day. The nurse and his teachers figure out how to deal with it. That's what they're paid for. ;)
     
  10. DsMom

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    LOL:p:p:p

    I'm sure our nurse could deal with it as well...they are wonderful. However, I've seen how busy they are on that day, and I doubt she'd be able to give my son her full attention...which he needs on that day. His teacher is not trained in how to check his BG. It's great your son's teacher is.:) I suppose I could train his teachers, but never felt the need since the nurses are always there. Plus, the teachers are also busy running the events, it would disrupt the whole event for her to keep checking his BG every 20 minutes or so...which I had to do this year.

    But, in the end, I think I'd just worry too much at this point. I've gotten pretty good at putting most D fears to rest...but Field Day always makes me tense. I'm impressed and jealous that you can stay at home!;):p
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    Oh, his teacher isn't trained to check BG. She's just trained to say, "Jack, go to the nurse.". ;)

    The CGM is very useful in these situations.
     
  12. Christopher

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    I do have to admit that I am VERY glad this school year is finally over! :cwds:
     

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