- advertisement -

honeymoon vs no honeymoon

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ralphied, May 24, 2006.

  1. ralphied

    ralphied Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Messages:
    24
    hi.i have read people in this forum saying they were glad the honeymoon was over?i was under the impression the honeymoon was easier to control sugars.am i mistaken.what do any of you people have to say about this and what differences can i expect when my 6yr old is out of honeymoon?any comments will be appreciated
     
  2. ralphied

    ralphied Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Messages:
    24
    any answers
     
  3. mom2emily

    mom2emily Approved members

    Joined:
    May 22, 2006
    Messages:
    70
    Hi....My guess is that the honeymoon period is different for everyone. My daughters honeymoon period lasted for about 3-4 months and she was able to go off of her lantus for that period of time which was great, that was one less shot a day she had to get. Her BG levels were pretty good during that time but we did have some trouble with lows. You are kind of glad when when it is over, it is like waiting for the other shoe to drop, its over and you can move on. Also I think some doctors like to wait until the honeymoon is over to start the pump. Hope this helps!
     
  4. fulljef

    fulljef Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Messages:
    31
    Honeymoon??

    The good and the bad about the honeymoon is that it is different in each child. For us it was more difficult because his own insulin level was never the same from day to day so there was no pattern to help you determine how to adjust the insulin that you give them... Our doctor who is now in Texas BOOOOO! had me call him first thing in the morning and at dinner to get the insulin right and it was never the same!!!

    The honeymoon didn't last long and once it was over the BG levels smoothed out and it became more routine, that is if you can call diabetes routine! I wish it had been like others I heard about where they could only use one shot a day or drop it completely but our son was so far into it that his pancreas just couldn't make enough insulin to have a honeymoon.

    Our family doctor missed the diaganoses and we went on vacation and had to drive back and go right to the ER but we went to the local hospital who transfered us to the big hospital in tulsa... Our son was seven at diagnoses and is now 13... I'm a dad and it's hard for me to recant the story I would do anything to make this disease go away!!


     
  5. zimbie45

    zimbie45 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    2,613
    HI
    Well for us we never really had a typical honeymoon for charlize.. ( if there is such a thing... Hers was quick... 1-2 months.. and was horrible.. we went to needing lots of insulin to not much.. ( but still enough for lantus and 4 shots per day), Her daily ratios carbs, isf and target almost changed every 3-4 days.. I my self was happier cause i just wanted to get the real deal; adn not play games with it any longer.. Even if it wasnt so short i dont like the idea of a honey moon.. for me and thing what it does to young kids... it just confuses them for the most part.... Its like ok your a normal kid able to eat normal things.. not have to do finger pokes ect... Then BOOM.. your diabetic but not totally just yet... Kids dont get that part of it.. Its taking candy from a baby, then handing it back to them and then taking it away and telling them opps sorrym here eat this carrot.... Ok that's my vent on a honeymoon.. UGH.. Great question though..
     
  6. Ben'sMommy

    Ben'sMommy Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    582
    Ben never went into a honeymoon phase.
    He was dx'd at 7 months.
    I'm kind of glad he didn't now.
    It sounds like a worse ordeal than none at all.

    Carol.
     
  7. EmmasMom

    EmmasMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2005
    Messages:
    2,689
    Emma never had a typical honeymoon phase either, she was completely insulin Dependant from the very beginning. She did however start requiring more insulin after her 12 month immunizations, about 3 months into dx.
    Maybe it has something to do with being so young at dx? It seems that babies always have a sudden and severe onset.

    My husband was dx'd at 26 and had a full year of honeymoon chaos. He would require insulin for a few weeks, and then none for a week, etc. It was a nightmare and meant constant BG swings and a lot of lows. We also kept hoping that "maybe" it wasn't type 1 after all. No Luck!
     
  8. Hollyb

    Hollyb Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,056
    I think when the honeymoon is "good" it's easier to control blood sugars without big swings because your body is providing some baseline insulin and adjusting it too -- so you may not plummet so low so quickly because your own body turns off its bit of insulin when you start dropping, or soar so high if you miscount the carbs because your body is helping out.

    But then the flip side, and I gather this is especially common towards the end of the honeymoon period, is your pancreas can start "sputtering out." So it may become very inconsistent and unpredictable, perhaps releasing almost nothing one day so that you run high for no apparent reason, then randomly dumping out a big gob of unneeded insulin sending you way low. THAT part of a honeymoon is no fun at all -- makes it really hard to judge proper doses and it's just so frustrating for a kid to be "doing the right thing" but having so little control.

    I actually wonder if we're getting a little of that right now -- from having a string of great numbers Aaron is having days where he hovers close to 10 for most of the day. Just when we start to think it's time to adjust his dose, he'll have a day where he flirts with lows. Confusing!
     
  9. selketine

    selketine Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Messages:
    6,057
    William needed insulin from the start for food but he did not need any insulin overnight. We could put him to bed at 120, for example, and he'd wake up at 120 just about. Whatever number he was at 10 pm he was that when he got up almost exactly. Now that was nice!

    He gradually started creeping up though and eventually needed overnight insulin - then we went to lantus (instead of a morning NPH shot). I did NOT want to use nph overnight.

    He didn't have the problem of needing insulin one day and not another as others have mentioned. A few times we suspect that he put out more insulin on his own and went lower overnight than we would have expected - but not a bad low.

    Our biggest problem was with NPH - he would get wicked and inconsistent drops with it mid-day (around lunch - but never at the same time). I was virtually housebound with him - afraid to get out cause when he got that drop I HAD to give him lunch. He was just 26 months at diagnosis so a little guy.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice