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Honeymoon I think...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Karla, Apr 23, 2009.

  1. Karla

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    We've made it thru the first two days back at school and one soccer practice. I can kind of see how this D thing can work with your life. I am very happy with the way Ben's school is handling this. They have experience and I'm on speed dial. We've made up a care plan we all agree on and it errs on the side of caution. One more thing, I am pretty sure Ben is in his honeymoon phase. The endo told me to cut his Lantus from 6 to 5 and maybe by Sunday cut it to 4. I am not giving him any humalog right now to cover for carbs because he is way too active and was going too low. I know it can differ for everyone, but about how long should this honeymoon phase last?
     
  2. badshoe

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    There is some initial insulin resistance that some times get called the honeymoon. That sounds like what you are seeing. It is one of D's mind games I call it maybe the Dr was wrong. See:
    http://www.ydmv.net/2008/01/newbie-advice-i-insulin-resistance.html
     
  3. Eve

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    I was told that the honeymoon can last a couple of weeks or many months.
     
  4. Becky Stevens mom

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    Hi Karla, it sounds like you guys are doing great!:) The honeymoon period can last a long time. Steven's was probably almost a year. He was not in DKA at diagnosis his blood sugar at dxd was 167 therefore it didnt take long to get his BGs under control. Im so glad the school is being helpful and it looks like everyones on the same page.
     
  5. Hollyb

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    I'm glad to hear you're all off to a good start!

    Aaron's honeymoon lasted about a year, but it wasn't an all or nothing thing. We had to keep adjusting his insulin doses up in little steps over the course of the year, and eventually he was up to doses that were about what our doc would expect to see for a kid his age and weight. He told us he's seen them as short as a few weeks and as long as two years.

    The honeymoon can be either an easier time (in which case, go for the two years, I say!) or a big pain, depending if your pancreas bows out in nice steady steps or sputters in and out randomly.
     
  6. wilf

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    I would very respectfully disagree with the above statement.

    I think what was meant was that in many children after diagnosis there is an initial period of "insulin resistance", when the body's tissues are still saturated with glucose from BG being high so long.

    As blood levels of glucose come way down with the insulin being given, the stored glucose in the tissues also gets worked off. After that insulin needs will drop. And additionally in some children the beta cells of the pancreas will at least partially resume functioning once blood glucose levels have been back in a more normal range for a few days to weeks.

    It sounds like you're just coming into the honeymoon. If so, it has its own challenges but in general the D will never be easier to manage once you're done reducing daily insulin doses.. :cwds:
     
  7. sbsmith1804

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    Derek is into about half way into month 2 since dx. and he too is honeymooning. He too is very active and into baseball this time of year. I don't know how long it lasts, but I am thinking this is the easy ride! **:D On a good note, Derek gave himself his own shot last night. Our kids progress at their own comfortable pace....I am sure the diabetes does too...lol.
     
  8. Barbzzz

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    I may be wrong, but I think there's an unofficial "definition" of the honeymoon period. This response is from this website, in the "ask the diabetes team" section.

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/dteam/2007-01/d_0d_efn.htm

    Another way to look at this is that most children require one-half to a full unit of insulin daily for every kilogram of their body weight. If your child requires less than that, I'd conclude that they were still in a degree of a diabetes honeymoon. Your pediatric endocrinologist can guide you further.

    For example, my DD weighs 25 kilos, and her average TDD is less than 16 units, so by that definition, she is still in her honeymoon. Alex was diagnosed in June 2008.
     
  9. Karla

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    wait and see

    I guess the only thing to do is to stay viligent with the carb counting and blood checks. Follow the endo's edvice and wait and see. I feel like I'm on a roller coaster and I've never been too fond of those!
    Thanks for the responses.
     
  10. frizzyrazzy

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    Sounds like you're doing really well. It is such a roller coaster at first.

    The way I liked to think of it and this is how I explained it to Ian (very rudimentary) - his pancreas was all stressed out. Once we started supplying some insulin his pancreas remembered what it was supposed to do, and started doing it again in limited form. Eventually all the cells that make insulin will die out but for a while you get some insulin production. Could be months, could be years. For most it's a very crazy time and a lot of guessing on if the panc is going to spurt out insulin today or not. Sometimes you get lucky and you get a true honeymoon when you need almost NO insulin. That's fun. For instance, a full 6 months after Ian's diagnosis he went down to almost no insulin at all. And his numbers were perfect.

    It's just all a guessing game though.
     
  11. debbiefran

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    My daughter is on a similar regiment for insulin... She is only on NPH and only uses novolog for bs over 250 (per my endo's instructions).. I am able to keep her bs within a normal range most of the time. .. She has been in the honeymoon phase since she was diagnosed back in sept.. The honeymoon phase is different for all people.It could be a week or a few years.. My endo said that you can tell when someone is coming out of the honeymoon phase when there is a trend of high bs (over 200's on every check) even through you are using recommended amount of insulin..
     
  12. Mom2Kathy

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    Kathy's almost a year into her diagnosis and she is still very much in the honeymoon phase. After our first Endo visit, she was taking 6 units of Lantus at night, 4 NPH in the morning and 1 unit of Novolog per 15 carbs breakfast and dinner. Only a couple of months after that she dropped to 2 Lantus and .5 Novolog. Right now she's at 1.5 Lantus, 1.5 NPH and .5/20 carbs breakfast, .5/15 carbs dinner. Still only two mandatory shots a day and an occasional extra one if she's high and wants a snack.

    Our Endo says he's seen the honeymoon last up to 3 years. He also says the A1C will also give an indication when the phase is ending. Her A1C's have been 5.4, 6.1 and 6.4 so far. So it's inching up slowly.
     

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