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Help! CGM wire left in arm

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by VikkiMum, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. VikkiMum

    VikkiMum Approved members

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    Hi
    I don't know what to do. I've just taken out my daughter's CGM sensor and not all of the wire has come out - in fact most of it has been left in. It's evening here in Scotland at the moment and I'm waiting for an out of hours doctor to call back. But what can i expect? I'm trying not to panic.
    Anyone had this happen to them???
    Thanks
    Vikki
     
  2. coni1523

    coni1523 Approved members

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    I have never had this happen, but which cgm system do you use? you could call the company and ask them as well. I would let the company know what has happen. Hopefully the doctor will call you soon. Let me know what happens. That is very odd. Sorry not alot of help. Just concerned!
     
  3. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

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    We haven't had this happen, but I'd try to think of it as big splinter until you can get to a doctor or call the company and get some good info.

    Do you have any epsom salts? You can often soak objects out with epsom, although it may be awkward to soak an arm.

    I've seen folks here go through the whole nine yards with an ER visit and cutting it out, I believe. I'm not sure I'd go that direction unless it migrated too far in to get out at home.

    I'm assuming you can see the wire in the skin? We once thought her wire had come off in the skin, found it on the carpet later, it became detached from the old site and fell on the floor!
     
  4. Amy C.

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  5. VikkiMum

    VikkiMum Approved members

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    Hi
    Thanks for your replies. The doctor told us it could wait until morning so we went along to our children's hospital today. I had a hunt around on the floor at home where we'd taken it out just in case it had dropped out but found nothing. They did an X-ray and sure enough a 4mm piece of wire has been left in her arm but not only that - there is another piece in there from a previous sensor - ????? I can't believe it! The doctor said that we could leave it as it's not near the surface and because the other one has caused her no harm. I wonder if there are any in her other arm??? The doctor said the benefits of having a CGM outweighs this downside but questioned whether it was this particular CGM. We have a Dexcom. Does anyone have any opinion on this? Has this ever happened with any of the other makes of CGM? Am I taking it out ok? I thought it was quite straight forward taking it out. Anyone got any tips on removing the sensors? With the other CGM',s is it a wire also or something else that goes under the skin? Argh! I'm so confused and feeling a bit low about it. We can't live without the CGM. I'm trying to do the best for my daughter. She's cool about it though and can't wait to show off tomorrow at school!
    Vikki
    x
     
  6. emm142

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    To your questions about different types of CGM, I have seen several posts about this happening with Dexcom and none with any other. I've never heard of it causing problems, though, so not sure that it would be worth switching CGMs over.
     
  7. Michelle'sMom

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    We've had one broken wire since we've been using the Dex. I take full blame, because I believe it was in the way I was removing the sensor. I contacted Dexcom to let them know, but we didn't go to the ER or even to the Dr. I could see & feel the wire end, but it was too short to grab with tweezers. The next day it was sticking out a little further & I removed it. I checked it against a new sensor to make sure (hopefully) that we got it all.

    I haven't heard or read of this happening with any other CGM. Dexcom is supposed to be addressing this problem with the design of the Gen4 sensors. We'll see.

    We're actually supposed to file a report with the FDA when things like this happen. We didn't. As you can see at the link below, few reports have been filed.

    http://google2.fda.gov/search?q=dexcom+broken+sensor+wire&x=0&y=0&client=FDAgov&site=FDAgov&lr=&proxystylesheet=FDAgov&output=xml_no_dtd&getfields=*


    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/search.php?searchid=4612589
     
  8. SarahKelly

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    I know of at least four other people whose children have had the dexcom sensor wire fall off inside of them, none of the children got infections from this nor did the wire work it's way out. It has to be a design flaw with dexcom, just my opinion of course, but I have yet to hear of it happening with other CGMs.
     
  9. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Sorry to hear about this and that it continues to happen. What are your thoughts (everyone) about whose responsibility it is to pay for the x-ray and broken sensor removal if you choose to have it.

    I'm personally upset that this is allowed to continue.

    Has anyone had problems going through airport security, especially flying abroad, with a sensor left in the body and showing up on a scan?
     
  10. Lisa P.

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    This is, I understand, a problem with the Dex.
    I'm guessing the benefit of a tiny wire means you have more likelihood of it breaking off.
    Plus my understanding is that this is more likely to happen in the very young, and no CGM system is technically approved for kids under 7. Dexcom might be 14, I don't know.

    I have mixed feelings, though, on getting upset. I do think people need to know, Dex needs to cover expenses, and they need to fix the problem. But right after it became an issue I saw a rash of posts here where people were unable to get approval for using the Dex. Also, folks who are upset by the FDA not approving things like an auto shutoff for a pump might note that if a chance of a wire sliver being left after off-label use means the FDA gets a lot of outrage, that's only going to make the system dig its heels in more, I'd think, to approving tech.

    I fully recognize, though, that I might have a little Stockholm syndrome going on. I get scared of not being able to access Dexcom tech because the FDA cracks down due to the wire issue. Also, Selah has never had a wire lodge in her skin. I imagine my POV might alter if my kid had a wire stuck in her. :(

    Glad the OP doesn't have infection, etc., best of luck to her figuring out how she wants to proceed. I think it's entirely fair to expect Dexcom to cover your costs.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    Well my dd has two wires in her. They never have come out but every once in a great while she will get a lump and where it is as if the body is trying to rid it.

    It is disturbing to know that it can happen but the usefullness far outweigh this draw back.

    I took her to the Endo the first time and she had a gander and was not worried about it unless it showed signs of infection, she truely believed it would work its way out.

    If it where to get infected and we needed to have a medical intervention then I am not sure how I would further feel...

    I hope that Dexcoms next generation will prove to be better in this capacity. Untill then I try to be very careful upon removal and make sure that it is all out.

    PS
    with both that left in the arm I think that they broke in the arm prior to removal, and both had been in for more than 7 days.
     

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