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HELP(bs580 b4 lunch) daughter not bolusing

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Momov2, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. Momov2

    Momov2 New Member

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    Nov 10, 2009
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    OK it finally happened after living w/d for 7 years my little love has finally decided she doesn't like having diabetes. No surpprise there-I figured it would catch up w/her at some point. Unfortunatly now she has this whole "I can't remember" or "Oh, I forgot" attitude and the results are too many high numbers.
    My Daughter is 11 (soon to be 12) and been a pumper for just over 1 year now. Today she didn't bolus for breakfast even though I reminded her and checked w/her twice b4 she left 4 school. When she did her pre-lunch test it was 580. My hands r in the air an I'm open for all types of suggestions.
    I need HELP, seriously I know I 'm not the first parent to travel down this part of the road. I would like advice from others on different ways to handle this.

    Thanks,
    Kathleen in VA.
     
  2. blbrocky

    blbrocky Approved members

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    It sounds like it's time for you to take over her care when she is at home. At school have her go to the office before lunch etc. There should be someone in the office that can ensure she is taking care of business. :(
     
  3. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    I agree. Kids aren't ready for the full responsibility of D yet and they just need a break. An adult needs to be supervising and doing all boluses at all times for now.
     
  4. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    I have an 11 year old, hes not the one with d but lately he cant remember his head if it werent attached to his body. I have to bring him back to school to get homework or books that hes left there. Love him dearly but its maddening I know. You'll just have to take over d care for her until shes ready to handle more of it.
     
  5. blbrocky

    blbrocky Approved members

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    It is a lot to deal with at such a young age.

    I try to take care of a lot of the stuff for my son who just turned 18. It scares me to think he will be on his own and have to deal with this 24/7.

    As a side note...... This morning he calls me from school and tells me he forgot his pump.:eek:
     
  6. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    First of all, I forgot to bolus for breakfast once (had done a correction for higher blood sugar to give her a head start and in my foggy stupor remembered it as a bolus for the food, as well). Just supervise or take over the boluses when you are at home. I always give DN (12) breakfast bolus, don't leave it up to her, because she is tired getting up and not that alert before breakfast. Either give or check on the boluses at home and have the lunch bolus at school checked by nurse or office; however you do it at school. We do most of the fingersticks and bolusing at home still. She is perfectly capable; just does not want to stop homework or computer or whatever to do it. Having D for seven years... exhausting.
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    My daughter is 11, almost 12 and D for just shy of 7 years. She's also had "forgetful" periods.:rolleyes: I give her a choice, since most happen at school I tell her that she can either do what she's supposed to, on her own, or she can go to the nurse's office and get her help. She always chooses to remain independent. Then she gets fair warning. I tell her exactly what I expect her to do, ie... test, text me #, bolus ( correct in needed), eat - she has a 30 day period during which she must focus on doing this correctly. Failure (hasn't happened) would result in loss of a privilige, success - a small reward and the expectation going forward that this is just what is expected of her.

    It sounds tough, but all I'm doing it clearly articulating the expectations and helping her set short term goals which help her develop better ingrained skills. It works for us.

    Good luck!:cwds:
     
  8. rebesser

    rebesser Approved members

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    maybe this is a golden opportunity for you to talk to your daughter and find out how she's feeling and what she wants to make things easier- if you ask her without assuming you know the answer she will feel listened to, but maybe you have tried this already. which bit of D does she hate/is bored about most? - blood tests?carb counting? infusion changes? bolusing? wearing something continuously? ...if you get down to the nitty gritty there may be bits that can be eased, and that way you acknowledge her feelings.

    Maybe she just wants a day off, or is getting a bit complacent about wearing a pump with basal continuously.Or maybe she has other more important things on her mind and really does forget - don't forget puberty is coming! or maybe she feels alone and is trying to deny her diabetes - has she met anyone else with diabetes her age?..or maybe she is just proving a point, that its her diabetes, not yours.....

    but she also may not tell you how she feels, maybe she would worry about hurting you, or maybe she thinks you might not understand....just as she will never understand how much you worry about her all the time.

    taking over without her consent may prove counterproductive but the balance has to be struck, she needs to be safe....

    do you have a remote control on her pump? - maybe you could do the carb counting and bolus from a distance, trying to bring her into the discussion?

    anyway, just a few thoughts, I am sorry you are having a tough time, hang in there.

    best wishes,

    Rachel from the UK
     

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