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Has your child lost conciousness at school before?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by chkpea, Aug 16, 2009.

  1. chkpea

    chkpea Approved members

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    I hope this is ok to ask here...we live in Ontario - the schools will not give glucogon at the school and ambulance will be called. Is there anyone out there who has had a child lose conciousness at school where they will not give glucogon and what were the outcomes? thanks .
     
  2. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    This is fine to ask here. Its never happened to us but Im just wondering why if there is a nurse available why they wouldnt give glucagon at the school. Im sure they would use an epipen if a child had a severe allergic reaction to bee stings or peanuts, am I right?
     
  3. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    Becky is right -- do they do they same when an EPI pen is needed.

    That being said, my son attended school for 6 years before I trained anyone on how to use the Glucagon kit. The first endo we had didn't recommend traning the school on how to use the kit. We don't see her any more.

    He never passed out -- he went low a couple of times, but his juice was always handy in the classroom.
     
  4. chkpea

    chkpea Approved members

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    oh there is no nurse at the school. I will be spending a lot of time there....they don't check b.s. as well. He will only be half days. A little while ago I was waivering about sending him or not. I am going to see how the first little big goes, I guess.
     
  5. StillMamamia

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    I seriously can't understand what the problem is with schools not being cooperative when it comes to testing BG and giving glucagon? Makes me so sad.:(
    We also don't have nurses here and rely on the good-will of the teachers. So far, we've been very lucky.
    HUGS!! I hope you find a good compromise.
    And, so far, no loss of consciousness.
     
  6. Snowbound

    Snowbound Approved members

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    We're also in Ontario. Our son has never gone that low. Any time he feels low he goes into the office to test and for a snack. His teachers also keep emergency snacks in their desks, along with the small tubes of icing sugar that our endo recommeded for more severe lows.

    For testing he goes into the office. He's old enough to test himself, but the school assigned someone to supervise him when he tests. It's one of the special needs kids aides. If she's not available one of the office staff oversees it.

    I'm not sure yet how we are going to handle this year as he has gone to the pump, but he's old enough (9) and knows his food enough that I'm not too concerned. I work out of the house, about 5 minutes from the school and my wife teaches at the school so there are not concerns there.

    We try to get them to contact me when they have concerns, but they almost always go get my wife from her class first.

    We put together a binder on diabetic info that they keep at the medical station, and we put together a two page overview that we give to his teachers in the fall when we meet them to explain his condition.

    It's important that you develop a good relationship with the school. You want to meet them in a friendly, relaxed way. You don't want to scare them about your childs treatment.
     
  7. Vi'sMom

    Vi'sMom Approved members

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    Vi went unconcious on the bus almost 2 years ago. the school called 911 and the ambulance administered the big red shot. It wasn't that the school knew how to or not (this school did just didn't have her "kit" since she's there long enought to transfer buses). She was at a bus transfer school, which is the other elementary school in our district so not our normal school. The bus driver is not allowed to give the shot, but there is trained people at the school who can, it's a policy the school has. The bus driver had a older student (i think 7 or 8th grade) get a playground aid who in turned called 911. Ambulance was there in less the a minute. (total bus time in a day= going to school about 15 min including bus transfer, coming home about 10 no bus transfer)
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2009
  8. Kalebsmom

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    Kaleb has had a few lower lows but nothing to that point. His school feels that the nurse is the only one that needs to be trained so IF he ever needs it we are in trouble.
     
  9. Corinne Masur

    Corinne Masur Approved members

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    I agree with the idea that it is important to stay on good terms with the school HOWEVER I do not think that that necessarily means settling for a situation that you do not feel comfortable with. My son's school does not have a full time nurse but they did assign a secretary to help my son if necessary - including overseeing his blood testing, insulin dosing and glucagon if needed. We went in to the school at the beginning of the year and spoke with all the teachers and staff that would be working with our son and gave them handouts about high and low blood sugars, how to recognize and treat and what to do in case of extreme lows. In the event that we all fear - the ambulance not coming quickly - it is important to have someone who is prepared to give the glucagon. Can you go to school and have a meeting with the principal to talk about this further?
     

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