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Halloween

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by samson, Oct 12, 2016.

  1. samson

    samson Approved members

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    Interested to hear how families with one T1D child and one or more non-T1D child navigate the stress of trick-or-treating (or not).
    Don't want to deprive my sons but don't want to bolus my kid for an orange bucket full of candy either.
    Any thoughts/tips most appreciated!
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

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    Hi,

    Below are some links that might be helpful.


    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes....074-Halloween-Candy-Lists&highlight=halloween

    http://www.jdrf.org/neny/wp-content/uploads/sites/36/2013/09/candy-carb-counts.pdf

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/pdfs/GlutenFreeCandy2014.pdf

    As far as how to handle the actual night, I usually just went with common sense. If your child didn't have Type 1 would you let them eat "an orange bucket" full of candy? Probably not. As for one child with Type 1 and one without, I would think/hope you would treat them the same.

    I would let Danielle go trick or treating and then come back to the house and spread the candy out on the floor, dividing up things she wanted and didn't want. She picked some candy to eat right then and we carbed for it. I let her eat as much as she wanted (within reason). It's Halloween!! The rest she saved and ate in the upcoming days, usually as part of a meal and we carbed for it. The leftover candy was also good for treating lows. Some years when she would get a TON of candy, we would make a game of "bidding" on it and that way we could reduce the amount she ate and also she could get some money.

    One thing to remember is that running around trick or treating, with all the excitement and exercise, may cause your child to go low. So if they don't have a CGM it is probably a good idea to check them at least once while they are cruising around the neighborhood. The bonus is that they can just reach into their bag and eat some candy, no shot or bolus!

    Let your child enjoy one night of dressing up, running around with their friends and gorging on candy.

    Happy Halloween!!


    (Just watch out for the CLOWNS!!!!!) :p



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    Last edited: Oct 12, 2016
  3. samson

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    Clowns: Almost as terrifying to me as that orange bucket of candy!
     
  4. Christopher

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    Not sure if this is your first Halloween or not but the first "anything" with Type 1 (Thanksgiving, Birthday party, Sleepover, Christmas, etc) can be anxiety producing. But if you prepare ahead of time and gather information and experiences from other people who have been there (as you smartly did), I am sure you will be fine. The links to the carbs for the candy should be especially helpful.

    Just remember, it is only one night. You may see some really high (or maybe really low) numbers, but I think making sure your child has a great time and sees that Type 1 doesn't have to stop them from doing anything is much more important than a high or low number. I can't help you with the clowns, unfortunately! :-O







    Oh Dad, you are SUCH a pain in the neck!!!!
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    Last edited: Oct 12, 2016
  5. Snowflake

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    We usually let our T1 graze a little while trick or treating to head off those lows that Christopher warned about. And then when we get home, we limit both our T1 and her little brother to about 5 more pieces or packs. Which is still a huge amount of candy for little people -- 80 or 100 carbs all told, which is close to her normal daily carb load. At least so far, they don't complain much about these limitations. These days, there are so many Halloween-themed parties and carnivals leading up to the big day that my kids are usually sugar-saturated by the time the big day arrives. And that also makes us less inclined to allow a candy binge on the rationale that it's "just one night," because it really feels like Halloween lasts a whole month!
     
  6. lauraqofu

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    I think it's super important that we, as parents, do whatever we can to teach our kids that their disease doesn't have to change their lives. As someone else said, it is just one night, so the extra sugar won't hurt. When my daughter was diagnosed, we didn't change the way we did anything...she wasn't allowed to eat candy until I inspected it, anyway, which meant nothing till we got home. She was always allowed to have her Halloween night gorge fest (which was never as much candy as she thought it was going to be, her eyes were always bigger than her stomach) and then it was parceled out in the coming days.

    These days, she doesn't trick-or-treat herself, but she does go with us as we take her younger cousins around, and happily helps herself to their candy should she feel low.
     
  7. susanlindstrom16

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    We just tend to let the evening take its course and bolus accordingly. As others have said, with all the running around, sometimes you WANT them to be eating some of the candy, lol. What's more annoying to me is the leftover candy that lingers for days...we save some of it for lows, my husband and I have our favorites that no one seems to like, and then after its been a little while, we just get rid of the rest.
     
  8. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Well, did you let your kids eat a bucket of candy on Halloween before D entered the picture? If not then just follow the same limiting and bolus accordingly minus the exercise and excitement and possible overheating or freezing , LOL, easy right? ;-) If you did, well ...
     
  9. Beach bum

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    When the girls were young (at the time one T1, one not) we let them keep about 15 pieces of candy. All the rest, went to work with dad. Then, we went to Target the next day and let them buy a costume for dress up. As they got older, we let them buy something at store. By 10, it was ah, whatever. But, after a few days, all the candy went bye bye. They grew tired of it, I grew tired of moving it around.

    I did keep candy for treating lows and I also would buy some half price after Halloween ;)
     

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