- advertisement -

Half way through freshman year?

Discussion in 'Parents of College Kids and Young Adults with Type' started by OSUMom, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    5,324
    I was wondering how it was going for families who had a son or daughter head off to college this past fall. How did the first part of the year go? I hope all is well. :cwds::cwds:
     
  2. Liongirl4

    Liongirl4 Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    244
    I was wondering that, too!
    We have had a good year so far..Samantha is only 40 minutes away, and has come home most weekends. She met another T1 the day she moved in and he has become a good friend. It helps me to know he would help her out if she needed it (And one night Samantha had to check his BG when he was acting silly, and give him glucose tabs..he wasn't real low but had a big drop in BG.)
    And her A1C was 7.1..not terrific but not to bad either!!
     
  3. basketballfan

    basketballfan New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    basket case

    New to this forum. Looking for some advice.

    My daughter is a college freshman this year. I wish she were geographically closer. She's in North Carolina and I am in Maryland, 420 miles and seven hours (if you're lucky with Capitol beltway and route 95 traffic...) away. I was a basket case the entire fall semester. She calls once per day to "check in". She went through some rough spots with infusion sites the beginning of Sept., and is experiencing problems again over the last few days. Amanda is using a Medtronic Minimed and quicksets.
    We met with a CDE through her new adult endo. while she was home over Christmas break, and Amanda was reluctant to try the suggestions at that time. Amanda has needle phobia and struggled to get past that hurdle with the help of a psychologist last summer. Other than the needle phobia issue, Amanda is a wonderful child. She tests her blood sugar 8-10 times a day, even setting an alarm to get up during the night to test. She is doing the best she can with respect to dealing with the offerings in the dining hall. Next year she will be in an on-campus apt. so that she can cook her own meals and not worry about waking her roommate during the night for testing or site changes.
    Amanda has gained 10-15 pounds since she left for school August 13th. I didn't bring it to her attention in November when she was with us for a brief few days. The CDE talked to her about it in December, and said maybe she should go to a longer needle, a 9 mm as opposed to a 6.
    Yesterday Amanda used a 9 mm for the first time after changing her set 4 times in three days because her blood sugars wouldn't come down with corrections and temp. basal increases each time. It just kills me to have her call me on the phone crying and so upset. It's all I can do to keep my composure when I'm on the phone with her. Yesterday she was talking about withdrawing from school because she can't handle the worry and stress about her diabetes care and perform well academically.
    She took a lighter load fall semester, 14 credit hours, as a way to ease into the academics while dealing with type 1 diabetes and everything ever other freshman has to deal with.
    Amanda also plays the violin in the Wilmington Symphony Orchestra, practices daily and takes a private lesson each week. She is taking a required gym class this semester and has been doing an abdominal circuit with a classmate/friend. Is that a bad idea with an infusion set in the ab or buttocks area?

    How do other parents deal with the constant worry? Has anyone tried counseling? Has it worked? I don't work outside the home, haven't since Amanda was born. I have a 16-year-old son, a junior in high school. He has Ulcerative Colitis. More worries there...My husband also wants me to reenter the workforce. I have been a full-time mom since Amanda was born with the exception of some writing and editing between children. I do exercise daily eat healthy foods and try to get my rest. The rest part has been very difficult because I wake in the night worrying about her and I'm dealing with night sweats at this point in my life.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you in advance for your help.

    Mary
     
  4. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    1,538
    Hi Mary,
    My daughter will be off to college next year and I can just imagine how you must feel. Was she recently diagnosed or recently went on the pump? If so, some of the issues she's dealing with would be the same anywhere she was. How are the 9mm sets working? I understand that she has a needle phobia, but I've heard that often the steel canula sets can be more reliable. If the problems continue and she can't get a good solution, she might benefit by taking a pump vacation and go back to MDI for a while.

    It's also important to consider that kids often experience homesickness and difficulties their first year of college...even without diabetes. It's a big change for them no matter how independent they've been before. Often, the second semester is a bit easier since they know what to expect after coming back from the winter break.

    I hope things smooth out for your daughter very soon.
     
  5. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2010
    Messages:
    1,538
    Sorry for the second post...but I wanted to address your worry issues. I would definitely try to do something to diffuse your worry, whatever works for you. For me, I would try to problem solve the issues with diabetes first, since that's a huge stressor. Once that is better I know my worry would be lessened. Still, everyone is different. You might need some more support while you are trying to problem solve with your daughter. If the idea of therapy sounds good to you...I'd pursue that route. Your endo might have the name of someone who specifically deals with the impact that chronic illness has on a family.

    My daughter used to have a lot of emotional difficulties when her blood sugar would be high or a set would fail. She's mellowed out considerably as she's gained more experience as she's dealt with more ups and downs and understands that she can't control some of the variables, much as she'd like to. When she isn't crying and upset about the blips that occur to us all, I am SOOOO much calmer, and so I'm thankful that she's transitioned to a more "whole picture" view. We kept telling her that it's not about one high number...but a big view of the good care she's taking. That didn't register with her until she embraced it herself.

    Continue to take good care of yourself!!
     
  6. Stacey Nagel

    Stacey Nagel Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2005
    Messages:
    581
    Jesse started college this year too! and has done well academically, socially and diabetically. He joined the crew team and is on the student hall council. Crew practice is for 1.5 hrs 5 mornigs a week... He eats breakfast before and after and has figured out how to keep his BS in range...
    He's 7 hrs away from home, in Buffalo NY.
    His A1c went up to 7.3 from 7... but he's doing it all on his own...... and to further challange him- he developed Mono about a week into this springs semester...
    and......... he's managing it 99% on his own- with only a few phone calls to me... He dealt with taking prednisone... adjusted his basal/bolus's.... and has been to the health clinic numerous times in the last 3 weeks...
    Meanwhile- I'm a wreck.... but I guess it's time to let him grow up... and he has.. and I am so very proud of him. :D
    now if I can only get him to clean his room when he's home...
     
  7. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    I have children in college too, but my youngest is the diabetic one.

    I was thinking empty nest syndrome, and I too worry about them.
    It's normal, and expected, especially since they moved away temporary, it makes you re evaluate your identy....at least that is how I feel.

    If your a stay at home mom, your focus is on family and home. Now you have to refocus your energy to something else. For me it's time to get back to things I like my art, photography, and working again.

    I guess I would allow your self to re invest in you....do the things you love to do.
     
  8. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    5,324
    Thanks for checking in everyone! :cwds::cwds: It was a difficult transition for this mom (our son had just been diagnosed a few months prior to leaving for college) and I think it helps to talk about it. ;)

    Basketballfan I hope things are going better for you all. I remember constantly keeping my cell phone with me (which I still do.) With my young adult "kids" I've always tried to keep communication lines open and be clear that there is/was never a problem where we couldn't find alternatives or solutions if they are/were having difficult times.

    Obtainedmist's response on worry is great. :cwds:
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice