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Grades & Diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kemjris, May 28, 2008.

  1. kemjris

    kemjris Approved members

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    Anyone else dealing with this. Morgan is 14 and has had a terrible school year. We've had an awful time controlling her sugar and has been high an awful lot this year. Her grades, however, have reached an all time low. Morgan is intelligent. She is in the accelerated program at school. She has had straight A's since kindergarten. This year's final averages are Bs, Cs and a D.

    She has a 504 plan, so she doesn't take tests if her sugar is too high. This seems like a good idea, but OK she waits to take her test when her sugar is in a normal range, but in the meantime, she sits in class with high sugars. She believes she is comprehending everything, but in reality she is so confused when her sugar is high, she is clueless. A lot of good it does to wait to take the test, when she doesn't have any idea what she learned in class. Any suggestions for changing her 504 for next year? She starts high school and grades take on a whole new meaning.
     
  2. ADHDiabetic Mom

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    I don't know what to tell you except that we have the same experience -- SD's grades suffer when his sugar is high. Thankfully, he's under good control at the moment and he's doing well, but I could see where it could become a problem if the BG got out of control. Have you had a conversation with the school counselor or 504 coordinator?
     
  3. mom to a sports nut

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    My daughter is 14 and this isn't an issue for us. She is on the honor roll and moving into advanced math in grade 9 as her grade 8 score is so high. Now, my 'normal' 15 year old is going through a stage where he is less than diligent about his school work and is letting everything slide.
     
  4. kemjris

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    I know she's working. I try to help her and she has two tutors for math trying to keep her caught up. She really struggled through Algebra 2 this year.

    I work in the district so know all of the teachers and counselors. This year only one of her teachers was extremely helpful and understanding. I am actually looking forward to her moving to the high school. My husband and I both teach in that building. We will have a lot more cooperation next year.
     
  5. selketine

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    This is the case when you need an IEP because her learning is suffering such that she needs some remedial help - IMHO. My kids aren't that old (and my D kid is just 6) so I can't suggest ways that would help but it seems like some extra instruction is in order for her during the school day - someone to go over with her what she is missing in class.

    My older son has ADD and will enter 6th grade next year and some accommodations like what he is getting might also help her - such as copies of the notes from the board (they use this fancy electronic whiteboard so he can get printouts). This could also be just teacher's notes - or also that your child is given a copy of notes taken by someone else in class who is a good note taker. Preferential scheduling - the school counselor could put her in her hardest classes at the times her sugar is most likely in range - assuming the classes are taught then that she needs to take, etc.

    I think since her grades are suffering so much with the 504 that you have a good case for an IEP....for an IEP learning *does* have to be affected....and her learning seems definitely affected.
     
  6. JohnMom

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    We had retention problems mid year. Our DS was running high from about 9:30 to 10:30 and was having problems retaining his English/Reading assignments. Come to find out they put him in with a different reading group and one of the girls kept poking him with her finger. He internalized it instead of saying anything to her, and his sugar shot to the 270-300 range. It took us 3 months to figure it out. The teacher moved him to a different group and the problem was solve. Unfortunately he had to play catch up the last semester, but we got there.

    This is our first year with D so I can't really offer any suggestions I just wondered if the problem is not the subject but some other environmental issue.
     
  7. kemjris

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    Since she is moving into our building, my husband and I are going to hand pick her schedule, including her teachers. I may have to look into the IEP thing. Thanks for your suggestions.
     
  8. selketine

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  9. kemjris

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    We thought that next year we would request that she be allowed to get notes from someone else (or teacher) and/or record the class if the bg levels are too high. We will need to determine at what level her bg affects her thought process.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  10. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    In addition, stay in very close contact with the ped endo and team to get bgs so they aren't so high so often. I would also consider a private psych. evaluation to see if she's dealing with any other issues you aren't aware of. (I suggest private so it doesn't end up in her school record.)
     
  11. mom to a sports nut

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    Here High school starts at grade 8. The move from Elementary to High School was a very positive one for Melissa. We saw positive changes in several areas that were in conjunction with the move to the older school. I really hope that this works for you also.
     
  12. kemjris

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    She's already done this. The endo thought she had an eating disorder or other problem that was causing the highs. The results: No Way! We start metformin on Friday to see if that helps with the control at all. Her endo keeps increasing her insulin. She averages 130 units a day and still runs in the 200-400 range a majority of the time. We've tried everything they suggested with no success. We're still working on it, but I am so worried about long-term affects. They don't seem to be as concerned as I am. We are thinking of changing endos. We're going to give the metformin a chance first. If it works, great. If not, they better have another idea or we are going to look elsewhere.
     
  13. selketine

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    Sounds like you are doing the right things. The more I think about it the more I think that the strategies that schools use with ADD kids (not the hyper - just those with attention issues) are probably good strategies at times for those with type 1. At least in our school system they are very used to dealing with ADD so they have lots of ideas for how to help the kids who can't pay attention. This is what is happening at times to your daughter so you might approach it that way.

    She should have a 504 transition meeting for the new school. The IEP is still a consideration I think (cause of the grades - she is obviously under-performing). You might note the similarities between her attention issues when she is out of range and a child who has ADD - they might have some more ideas for you.:)
     
  14. kemjris

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    Here's the thing. We don't really have 504 meetings. I write a plan and they agree or make changes. We met the first time when they wanted to talk me out of it. Each year, I made adjustments or changes as needed, they agreed or made their adjustments. That was the end of it.

    The middle school 504 person is the assistant principal who knows absolutely nothing about it. The first time he even questioned whether we should have a plan, because he saw Morgan eating ice cream in the cafeteria. :eek:(HORRORS!)

    The nurse is great! She rolled her eyes and said, I tried to explain it to him. He doesn't get it.

    So anyway, she moves into my building next year. I don't anticipate any problems with acceptance by administration. I also don't anticipate a meeting. My husband and I will decide what is best and give it to the school.

    Thanks again for all suggestions.
     
  15. AJsmom

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    I'm so glad you brought this up! We have been dealing with almost the exact same issues this year with our 15 year old. I know his bg's are playing a part (however, our son has not exactly been responsible this year!). Anyway, I have an appointment with the principal and the counselor to see how we can help him next year. I'll let you know if they offer anything enlightening!
     
  16. selketine

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    Hmmm....at our school it is the counselor and someone else (like a "learning specialist" who has all of these great suggestions. You probably already know who it is at your school who is "in the know" for ADD strategies and talk to them about it directly. Then just incorporate those changes into your plan.

    To get an IEP I'm sure you'd have to do the full meeting though - good luck.
     
  17. Flutterby

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    have you tried switching insulins? sometimes one might work better than another for a person..
     
  18. Donna C

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    I AGREE! I teach ADD and Dyslexic students (BRILLIANT, BRILLIANT kids by the way). Each individual is so very different . . . cannot carbon copy each one's strengths and weaknesses in a neat little plan. The SmartBoard can very easily be printed . . . it's the same as printing the page on your computer screen. I love the idea of preferential scheduling. What works for one student on an IEP or 504 may not work for another -- individuality. You're not asking to excuse her from responsibility; you're asking to allow her to show her amazing potential. Talk to administration, individual teachers, the counselor, etc. Just as ADD or dyslexia affects learning and performance, of course diabetes affects it . . . actually, the diabetes makes it even less predictable. Stay very involved, help your child display the best attitude possible, and definitely pursue changes and more accommodations!
    Just FYI, I understand the learning differences and appreciate the need for individualization, but too many teachers simply do not. Do not get the teacher on the defensive from the start ... it will not help you at all. Use a sincere gentle approach and let the teacher know you want to be on his/her team to help this child together. I not only teach these kids; I live with two dyslexic ADD kids at home (the older one also diabetic). I've had to do the parent fight thing, too, at my kids' school! It's frustrating!
     
  19. dbz2988

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    Jr has an IEP. He had ADD (non-hyperactive) prior to diagnosis of D, however, ADD is no longer listed in his IEP. His grades do suffer when he is high and simply CANNOT focus. His IEP makes several accomodations and is very specific.

    If you are interested in the specific's and wording, just PM me and I'll be happy to help you out. We just updated his for next year (8th grade).
     
  20. ctwetten

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    I'm not a parent, just a student with D myself. I just wanted to say that this happens to me too and it's frustrating, especially because I feel like people think I'm faking it. Anyway, good luck, and I would recommend sounding her out about frustrations in this area and trying to talk to her about it and maybe getting her in a support group (as nasty as that term always sounded to me as a teenager.:)) When frustration is added to the situation it just gets worse...
     

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