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Getting our feet under us finally!

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by ViragoTwins, Jun 11, 2012.

  1. ViragoTwins

    ViragoTwins Approved members

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    Hello, from Canada! My 7 1/2 year old son was dx just over 2 months ago. The twist for us is that he has an identical twin brother. Luckily there is no sign of T1D with him yet, but we will be having him tested regularly as apparently there is a 50% chance that it will develop with him too.

    We've been doing pretty good with the insulin regime, however DS is still in a honeymoon period, so supplied insulin is pretty low. One problem we've been having is with DS's attitude - sometimes he's unwilling to cooperate and gets angry at us, to the point where we have to hold him down to test BS or give insulin. It breaks our heart to have to do this, but we will do what we have to to keep him alive.

    The diabetes clinic says he's not a candidate for the pump yet, but it is something we'd like to consider it in the future.

    Just wondering if anyone else has had similar issues with their child not accepting the new requirements?

    Thanks, and HI :cwds:
    Jan
     
  2. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    Hi and welcome Jan:cwds: My son was much younger when he was diagnosed. A little over 3 and did not like any of it at all! He would run away when it was time for shots or tell me that he didnt need his insulin that day:( It was rough going for a few months until he got used to things. Your child is a bit older so is used to things being a certain way so this is very different for him. Is he willing to try his hand at testing himself yet? Maybe if he can be more involved in his own care he will learn to accept it more readily? And the fact that his twin doesnt have to deal with this probably makes him very angry and resentful. Maybe there are other children at school with type 1 that he can talk to and become friends with? It does take time for sure but he will come to understand that he must do these things now to stay healthy.
     
  3. Lou :)

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    Hi Jan and welcome! My son Nolan was diagnosed in January of this year shortly before his 14th birthday. I think his age has been an advantage for us as we have not had to deal with some of the issues you mentioned. He is a very private kid so it has taken a bit of encouragement to get to the point where he is now comfortable with testing and shots in public but he is certainly getting better with things as time passes. Wish I could offer you a bit more advice but I just wanted to say hello and let you know that we are not far away in Brandon, MB!
     
  4. Christopher

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    Welcome but sorry you have to be here.

    I think it is very normal for a child to go through phases where they rebel against having this illness. Over time I think he will come to be more accepting.

    As for your other son, I personally would not test him regularly. What kind of life is that for him? I am of the belief that if he is going to get Type 1 he is going to get it and there really is nothing you can do about it. Why keep reminding him about it? Where did you get the information about him having a 50% chance of developing diabetes?

    Just my 2 cents.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2012
  5. ViragoTwins

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    As for testing him regularly, he lets us know when he wants to do a finger poke, and we decided as a family that at Dylan's annual blood draw the others in the family would all be tested for T1 antibodies at the same time. (The initial blood draw before dx was very traumatic for Dylan)

    We were told this on the first day of the diabetes clinic.

    Jan
     
  6. ViragoTwins

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    Lou, (what are the odds of another Manitoban being on this site?!)
    Nolan and Dylan seem to be a lot alike, it was quite a struggle before Dylan would do finger pokes in public (even in front of family members was uncomfortable for him)
    Jan
     
  7. Becky Stevens mom

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    Here is some info about identical twins and risks of getting type 1 diabetes

    http://forecast.diabetes.org/magazine/features/why-me-understanding-causes-diabetes

    "Scientists have done studies of twins to help estimate how important genes are in determining one?s risk of developing diabetes. Identical twins have identical genes and thus the same genetic risk for a disease. Research has found that if one identical twin has type 1 diabetes, the chance that the other twin will get the disease is roughly 40 or 50 percent."

    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/genetics-of-diabetes.html

    "Genes alone are not enough. One proof of this is identical twins. Identical twins have identical genes. Yet when one twin has type 1 diabetes, the other gets the disease at most only half the time"

    http://www.genetichealth.com/dbts_what_is_type_1_diabetes.shtml

    "Out of 100 people with Type 1 diabetes, 80 have no family members with the disease. The remaining 20 people have at least one family member with diabetes. Although most people in the population have a 0.4 percent chance of developing Type 1 diabetes, the risk increases to about two percent if your mother has diabetes and six percent if your father or siblings have Type 1 diabetes. If your sibling with diabetes is a fraternal twin your risk increases to 11 percent and it increases to roughly 50 percent if your identical twin has diabetes."

    I do hope that your other son doesnt get type 1 diabetes ever in his lifetime. But if he does, he will be in good company. And he along with his brother will be able to achieve any goals or dreams they want. The sky's the limit:cwds:
     
  8. miss_behave

    miss_behave Approved members

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    Those kinds of comments from D teams annoy me, if one uses insulin and wants to pump, then IMO they are a candidate for one! Don't let your clinic give you arbitrary reasons not to pump if and when you feel you are ready to. Reasons such as waiting a year past diagnosis, having small insulin needs, being in the honeymoon period etc are common but not valid reasons, just cop-outs or plain ignorance. All the best :cwds:
     
  9. Turtle1605

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    My son is still honeymooning. Five months after diagnosis...he was on the pump. Our endo did start us out on shots, mostly for the purpose of getting dosages as accurate as possible before starting the pump and to make sure we understood how to give shots and how to calculate insulin needs, adjustments and corrections. We have now been pumping for about a month and it has really given us a break!
     
  10. Pauji5

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    I'm sorry you have to be here. I just wanted to say I think it's a mistake to keep testing your non D child on any sort of regular basis. After our daughtere was diagnosed, she was 7, her brothers 9 and 11. We did test them once in a while, but never made a big deal out of it. We also declined the TrialNet testing. There is no way to avoid D if you going to get it, so why make them worry?

    We did notice our middle son displaying symptons, had him tested for antibodies and he was diagnosed 3 years after his sister. We caught the signs very early, as anyone who lives with diabetes on a daily basis would.

    We did not, however, up until that point, worry about him. Hopefully, you'll be lucky and never have to deal with a second diagnosis. In the mean time, I would just be glad you only have to deal with one case.

    As far as your son not liking it, I'm sorry. My daughter was never thrilled, but we never gave her a choice, never let her see us cry, never once said, ok, later. She adjusted pretty quickly and today, at age 11, is totally manging her diabetes herself. (we help her when she doens't feel like doing it)

    Good luck! It is SO hard in the beginning, but it does get better!!!!!
     

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