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Getting annoyed with my daughter's nurse

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. Lizzy731

    Lizzy731 Approved members

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    I don't understand why it MUST be an RN? Is the school nurse that busy that she can't draw up an insulin syringe every so often? Instead of employing an RN to watch your child they should the school nurse an asst. This would be more cost effective and would benefit the entire school. Then they can use one of their employed aides for your daughter.
     
  2. mmgirls

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    That is not true for everyone, it is a very individual thing. My. Dd was DX at 13months and would say she was hungry in a particular way, still to this day when she says she is low in that particular way we know she is low hungry and not just hungry, we are very thankfull.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    Ya, when they are paying for a full time RN, what's a few rubber gloves added to the pile of $?
     
  4. Beach bum

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    This is what I was wondering.

    My daughter went to a smaller elementary school and there was a full time nurse with a health aide. Now in middle school (larger) there is a ft nurse and a pt nurse. At both of these schools, there were kids with a broad spectrum of health issues, from diabetes to kids with feeding tubes. All are carefully managed by properly trained para's. I think only one has a medical background, and that's because he's a volunteer fireman.

    Honestly, as a tax payer, and considering the gov't was just shut down today, I'd be livid knowing that my tax money was going to pay for a full time RN devoted specifically for a child who, while she needs medical assistance, could easily be cared for by a 1:1 or health aide.
    I think it's a matter of the school doing a "cover their asses" plan. They are afraid something will happen with your daughter, so they figure if they have a FT nurse assisting her, nothing will happen and they can't get sued. Guess what? Diabetes is so unpredictable that a problem can happen anywhere, anytime.
    It's really too bad the pump didn't work for you because you wouldn't have to deal with the issues of not getting enough insulin and all the rounding business. The doc would just write on the orders, follow pump dosing, and it can't be questioned.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    To what I highlighted in bold - there are tricks to not getting air bubbles. Perhaps you didn't try them all.

    Start with room temperature insulin - prime the cartridge by pumping the plunger repeatedly with air - force units of air into vial - let the pressure of the air start the flow of insulin into the cartridge (don't pull on the plunger right away - fill slowly - tap bubbles and flush them out - let cartridge sit undisturbed for a while then come back and tap and flush and with loading prime tubing generously, a good 10 units past the drip point.

    I'm not looking to be snarky but there is no reason to have air in the tubing. If this is what stopped your pumping and if not pumping is creating issues at school then I would revisit my cartridge filling technique with the pump I own and not pin my hopes on a second system.
     
  6. Beach bum

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    Agreeing on the above. And just to add, air bubbles are not a pump related issue. It is to do with the infusion set, and or how it was prepared. In 8 years of pumping, we've only had a few instances of air bubbles that I can remember, and a disconnect and prime usually righted it. We started pumping at age 4. My daughter got hardly any basal insulin at all, and there was never an issue with clogging. She got enough boluses through the day to keep things moving. We have had bent cannulas, caused by her doing something crazy to make it happen, coming to the end of a set life and it just got knocked in such a way, but I honestly could count those instances on one hand and that's in all these years of pumping. First set to be ripped out was Saturday night. She was rolling around with her sister on the floor. So, what I'm saying is these things happen, not often. Though, some times it does seem like when it rains it pours and you may have a series of it all at once.
    I know you are hesitant about pumping for many reasons, but do you think going to another system will be any different?
     
  7. danismom79

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    I remember responding to another thread of hers and telling her that we've gotten similar issues with the pod (bent cannula, rip outs, outright failures). We all face issues now and again. Pumping or MDI, diabetes is probably extra hard for a perfectionist who needs absolute control and everything to go right all the time.
     
  8. Ndiggs

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    All depends on your state laws, agency and protocols. If we don't use universal precautions (gloves minimum, mask, goggles ect) you can and will be investigated and your license suspended while you are investigated here. Not worth it to me to risk my job and ability to take care of my family because someone is not comfortable with their child being tested in the classroom with gloves on.

    Its not only for your kid either, it also provides protection for anyone else that the caregiver might take care of. Not saying that a elementary student is at high risk of Bloodborne pathogens, but its just not worth it for.

    If gloves are really that much of an issue in class, have the teacher and nurse, and maybe parent too if the district allow it explain to the class what Diabiates is, why she needs her sugars check and that involves blood so we wear gloves to make clean up easier and stay safe. Great learning and education chance to me rather than a point to fight over.

    Sorry if that came off as harsh but to me gloves when you have a licensed health care provider are a no brainier to me
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    My son's school has 800 kids. If the nurse gloved, masked and goggled (really?!) every time she touched a kid (maybe she should gown too?), she'd never get anything done. Heck, the nurses in the HOSPITAL didn't even glove to check his BG.

    If one is a medical professional and they cannot check a BG without touching blood, they need to find a new profession.

    And ALL I'd need is for the nurse to give a talk to the class about how my kid is so dangerous that the nurse can't touch him without gloves. OMG.
     
  10. Ndiggs

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    Your missing my point. If she is required to use gloves than she is going to use gloves and that is not a fight that you will win so why bother.

    As far as universal precautions go I was giving example, you use what is prudent for the situation, but per infection control we have to have gloves on to even touch a patient (take a pulse BP ect) so it is not out of the realm for me to see a service requiring a nurse to wear them when dealing with any amount of blood. May seen crazy to us but if that is what she is required to do why fight it

    And if nurses are not gloving up that me be standard where you are, here they all have to anytime blood is involved and for vitals they have to wash before and after contact if they don't glove

    My point is still your probably not going to win on gloves so why fight that battle and why not focus on bigger issues with the care like the rounding
     
  11. miss_behave

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    Ya, I'm a RN in a hospital and I never wear gloves for BG checks, and neither does anyone I work with. You'd have to be pretty dang klutzy to get blood on yourself. I would laugh at anyone who suggested I was putting my license at risk for this. Then again, I live in Australia and we don't seem to have as many arbitrary rules governing our practice. PPE is our responsibility and at our discretion. Probably cos we don't have as many lawsuits here ;)
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    If she insisted on it, I would want the checks done somewhere where the other kids didn't see her treating my kid like she had a disease that could be transmitted by simply touching her. I think you underestimate the perception here. (But I wouldn't want a 1:1 for the same reason. I can't imagine how fragile the other kids must think this child is.)
     
  13. Lizzy731

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    I don't think the OP really minds the gloves but just for my own curiousity I put in a call to my school nurse. She explained that for situations requiring handling a great deal of blood or other bodily fluids use of gloves is recommended. She was unsure if it's a requirement for a finger stick so now she's curious and is going to find out and get back to me.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

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    If she doesn't care about the gloves, then whatever, but if the gloves are part of why the child is missing so much class, I don't understand why the nurse doesn't get everything ready (including the oh-so-necessary gloves) and then do the poke or shot. What is the point of having a nurse in the room if the child is just standing there for 10 minutes while the nurse gets everything ready? I mean, a fingerpoke takes about 5 seconds to do, as does a shot to administer. Nothing else requires the nurse to pull the child away from her desk. I'm just baffled as to why the child is so behind on her work with a 1:1 RN.
     
  15. Lizzy731

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    I agree...the gloves do contribute to the time factor. That's why I'm curious...but I think the OP admitted once (I'm sorry if I get this wrong) that she is a germ-a -phobe so I don't think she sees this as an issue. But I do agree with you that I believe it to be a contributing factor and also an attention grabbing thing. The child is only 5...if she continues to have this nurse it will get worse as the children understand more and more. My daughter would have a FIT if someone was donning gloves to do her stick. She would be very embarrassed.
     
  16. mjonesdo

    mjonesdo New Member

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    I have had issues with nurses in the past thinking they know more than the parent, so completely understand your frustrations at this point. My daughter ended up 2 grades behind in reading and I believe it was due to the nurse pulling her out of class so much in her early education. She actually told me the nurse was having her do laps around the school to bring her BS down instead of giving her insulin, crazy right! You need to make it very clear to the school that they she be doing minimal things as to not distrupt her time in class, like allow her to test in class. Actually, I my daughter has gotten older I have made her more independent with her care and got her away from the nurses as quickly as possible. She now is in middle school and carries her phone and test supplies in a purse and texts me her BS's and only goes to nurses office at lunch and when emergency.
    melissa
     
  17. Ndiggs

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    I agree with you there, no reason the nurse could not put them on have a lancet ready to go and a strip in the meter, 30 seconds later done and done

    I did ask our school district today why they used gloves, and the response I got was per state dept of ed requirements and their insurance requires it for ANY blood exposure, even putting on a band aid. Every state is different, but I guess I don't see it as a big deal, but than again there are 2 boxes of gloves in every kindergarten and first grade room at our daughters school just for the shear number of band aids they put on (wood chips and the running track on the playground = lots of scraped knees and elbows) Our daughter has had it for 2 years now of gloves at every check (unless her mom or I do them) so maybe I look at it differently.

    Lizzy731, I would be very curious to find out what your school nurse finds out on glove requirements there, if you don't post it back here for whatever reason, could you PM me please?
     
  18. Lizzy731

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    She said that they are told to use some sort of barrier method which doesn't REQUIRE use of gloves for a finger stick. She said in all her years of working in a school she is just careful when she does a stick and use of gloves are not necessary in her opinion.
     
  19. missmakaliasmomma

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    Yes, everyone, she is a germaphobe lol. Someone mentioned that I'm underestimating the perception of my daughter by the other kids because this is done in class and the nurse wears gloves, etc... You're right. That's not something I even considered when asking for an aide, which is definitely why we're pursuing the cgm route and will probably consider pumping again in the future. I don't want my daughter feeling different (with it being a problem)
     
  20. wilf

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    Lucky you, in Australia!
     

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