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Getting annoyed with my daughter's nurse

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Sep 28, 2013.

  1. ChristineJ

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    Agreed, on all counts. I'd even take it a step further. IMO, she's putting her license MORE at risk by failing to administer a dose of insulin without appropriate follow up.

    Christine
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    The gloves thing would piss me off. My son has had 3 different school nurses now, and none of them gloved to check his BG. Does she think that blood is going to be spurting out of her finger? :rolleyes:
     
  3. missmakaliasmomma

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    You'll get a kick outta this then. On Friday morning when I came to drop her off, I had a cold... Just a cold. The nurse says "are you sick?" and proceeds to act like I have the bubonic plague lol. She wouldn't come within 5 feet of me.. seriously.
     
  4. Lizzy731

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    Oh you poor thing....you really have nurse ratchet there!

    May I ask what part of NY you are from? The state or near NYC?
     
  5. missmakaliasmomma

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    The state. I can't stand the city lol. Hudson Valley. Where are you from?
     
  6. Lizzy731

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    Nassau county
     
  7. Caysie98

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    Wow, that sounds pretty ridiculous. I never had an aide in elementary school (but I was diagnosed when I was 7); my mom thought it would be unnecessary and would just make me feel different. My school nurse who was an RN was very flexible and used her judgement to make sure I was cared for as best I could be, even if that meant she had to deviate a bit from the doctor's orders. The new law you have to deal with sounds like a big pain. Hopefully as the year progresses your aide will get more comfortable with making common-sense judgements.

    I don't understand why the aide has to put on gloves and test her sugar for her. If your daughter can test herself with the aide's supervision that seems like it'd be a lot faster.

    How long do you plan on her having an aide? I can see why one could be useful in kindergarten and maybe 1st grade, but she probably won't need one beyond that. I was testing myself in the nurse's office before lunch and when I felt low/high when I was in second grade. Over the summer I went to camp sweeney and learned how to give my shots so by third grade I was giving my own shots before lunch (with the nurse's supervision). When I got my pump that year it was even easier.
     
  8. missmakaliasmomma

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    After this, I dont want an aide ANY longer than she truly needs one for.. I was all gung ho on having one all of elem school, now I'm like :eek: -- definitely changed my mind lol. She can test herself now, but doesnt know what the numbers mean yet. I feel if she gets a cgm and goes back on the pump eventually when shes a little older, we really wont need one.

    Earlier this evening I asked her if she wanted to try to give a shot herself (without insulin) she said yes.. I definitely feel we're going in the right direction with her taking over D responsibilities. She wants to do it.
     
  9. virgo39

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    I think this is part of standard "universal precautions" recommended by, IIRC, the CDC and other medical organizations. Unless the nurse were making a big deal of this, I would not have a problem with it.
     
  10. Lizzy731

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    True but in a school with a diabetic child it's a judgement call.
     
  11. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think it's inevitable that there would be clashes in care ... think about it. You have a professional person, an RN, sitting in a kindergarden classroom ALL DAY LONG tending to one child with Type 1. What else is she going to do other than enact and impose every possible justification for being there? If not only to protect her job and license but to justify and protect her professional sanity?
     
  12. Lizzy731

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    Trust me...the aide does come in handy and you wouldn't want to let go of an aide until she is completely ready because once you let the aide go, it's very difficult to get one back. However I would ask for a "downgrade" to a regular 1:1 if they will allow. Once your DD is doing more for herself an aide can assist and remind her and look over her shoulder to make sure she's doing everything right. I don't think an MD would write self medicate forms until she demonstrates maturity. Bethany got her self med orders when she was end of 2nd grade. And that's because the school nurse was hovering and doing everything so slowly and documenting as she used the pump. It would drive Bethany nuts because she just wanted to get on with things! That's why I pushed the endo to write the self med orders because DD was getting stressed.
     
  13. Ndiggs

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    maybe not, as an EMT in Mi if I am in school to treat my own kid and I don't use gloves it can be my license. Really the gloves are not a big deal, just extra cost for the district
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Except it is a big deal when all the other kids in the classroom see "little Suzy" has a nurse who puts on gloves before she checks her. Can you imagine anything more differentiating than that for a bunch of 5 year olds?

    Honestly, an RN sitting bored and underemployed in the classroom is my vision of a nightmare. It shouts "this child is sick, watch out!"

    If this were my kid, I'd be seeking a change to a para, a student teacher, a nursing student, a volunteer... anyone other than an RN. But then I don't think any type 1 kid needs or is served by having a full time 1:1 nurse, perhaps not even a 1:1 aide, no mater the rank.
     
  15. virgo39

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    Not necessarily--school governing bodies as well as the OSHA may require the use of universal precautions (which are well described on the CDC website). I am sympathetic to healthcare workers who are following what I view as otherwise generally sensible rules (even if I don't follow them myself), even if it is not a rule that I follow.

    I believe that our nurse no longer tests DD, but in kindergarten she did, and I am reasonably certain that she followed those precautions and used gloves. I don't think it took her a long time or that she did it in conspicous or "negative" way.

    ETA: I think the gloves issue is minor compared to not providing insulin and requiring doctor's orders for everything. The OP has a challenge in light of what seems to be a somewhat inflexible NY law--at least inflexible in terms of T1.
     
  16. mmgirls

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    I skirt this rule and use 1 gloved hand. Same thing if I am helping with a bloody nose of a little one that just can't get it to stop.

    I am pretty sure that when my dd was younge they gloved up.
     
  17. missmakaliasmomma

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    I'm sure you're exactly right with this statement. In the meeting, they asked if an LPN could be brought in instead, that was quickly shut down.
     
  18. missmakaliasmomma

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    Also, since she was diagnosed at 1.5 years, she still doesn't recognize lows. She claims she feels normal. I think it's because she was dealing with the highs and lows before she knew how "normal" felt. If she was dxd at 7, I have no doubt that she'd recognize lows. Without a cgm, she can't go anywhere by herself because I don't feel comfortable with that, because of her hypounawareness. she's comfortable testing herself (can't interpret numbers though) and I helped her give herself a shot today. I'm sure in a year, she'll be able to do a lot herself, but it's not gonna happen this year, maybe not even next.
     
  19. missmakaliasmomma

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    Also, her endo thinks dex is a great idea for her and told me to fill the papers out on their website and the rep will contact me. Hopefully all goes well.

    Eventually,not anytime soon, I think we'll want to go on the pod when they get their issues straightened out with these new ones. A MAJOR issue we had we the ping was the air bubbles in the tubing.. No matter what we tried, it didn't matter, still bubbles. At least there's a much lower chance of that issue (if at all) with the pod and its just really a cannula to worry about. She'll also need more basal at that point, so there will be more pressure to keep the cannula from clogging.
     
  20. Lizzy731

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    I agree 100%. Gloves draw more attention to the child. And if my school nurse who is an absolute stickler for the rules doesn't wear gloves when doing a stick then I'm certain there is no law.

    A nurse may seem like a wonderful choice to take care of your child in school but IMO a nurse brings on their own opinions about how to properly care for a diabetic which may clash with the parent's management. And I agree it may be boring for her. She has a masters degree...I don't understand why she isn't doing something more exciting. No offense meant to the OP...but I can't imagine taking care of your daughter can be that challenging! Lol
     

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