- advertisement -

Four year old fighting me

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by alnoll, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. alnoll

    alnoll Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Food has become a real fight in our house with her on levimer and novolog not eating through out the day is not an option. She isn't food motivated so I can't bribe her with food. We fight every meal about when she eats what she eats and how much she eats. I'm at my wits end and as a mom I feel like I'm ruining the relationship with my daughter because we fight so much. Any one else go through this? How did you get through this?

    AmberLynn mother to Ania dx in 2009 now 4 on levimer and novolog
     
  2. miss_behave

    miss_behave Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    2,217
    Every meal should not have to be a fight! A Levemir/ Novolog regime should be flexible enough to not require a fixed meal plan. Can you explain how your insulin regime works?

    Usually a Levemir/Novolog regime would work like this. Ideally if the Levemir (basal insulin) is set correctly, one would not have to eat at all as this insulin given in 1 or 2 injections daily would keep one stable throughout the day. Novolog (bolus insulin) should then be used to cover carbs eaten. Do you have an insulin to carb ratio? If so, your daughter should be able to eat as much or little as she likes and you would simply dose the insulin for this. For example if you had an insulin to carb ratio of 1:15, if she ate 30g of carb she'd get 2 units. Does that make sense? If you are on a fixed meal plan without an insulin to carb ratio, I would ask the Endo for one as force feeding a little one is no way to live and not necessary with modern basal/bolus insulin regimes. :cwds:
     
  3. alnoll

    alnoll Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Ania is on an insulin to carb ratio, but with as much running around as she does at four, I need her to eat to sustain the levimer in her body especially because she does get a peak from it. Maybe her levimer dosage is off but i find if she doesn't eat we're fighting lows all day.
     
  4. miss_behave

    miss_behave Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Messages:
    2,217
    Is she on 1 or 2 shots of Levemir a day? It does sound like it may need some adjusting.
     
  5. alnoll

    alnoll Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Two 1.5-2 units in the morning on the day(depends on our plans, if she's sick, if it's hot, ect) and 1.5 at night. So she isn't getting a lot, she's small for her age though. She didn't used to fight me about food, it's a newer thing.
     
  6. kiwiliz

    kiwiliz Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2008
    Messages:
    893
    You poor thing. From experience I can at least assure you that it will not destroy your relationship - mine fought about all sorts at one time or another - and still usually like/love me. :)

    The previous posters all seem to have sensible advice. We had, when on mdi, injections for each meal. This would mean they could skip one if they didn't/couldn't eat it. Hunger always drove them to the table though. The only one to have to deal with the consequences is you, however, your daughter won't be bothered at all. Have you tried a small toy. A seminar I went to said one family taped a whole selection of little cars around the ceiling and every time their son finished his meal he got a car. The reward has to be immediate with little kids.

    I hope you get on better. I remember conning my children with "oh no - you can't have this little tree (broccoli) it is very expensive... oh - maybe just a little piece. They still love their veg! :) You do what you have to! :D
     
  7. lynn

    lynn Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    3,112
    I remember those days well! The little stinkers know how to get to us, don't they? What I did was pretend that it didn't matter if he ate or not. He used to wake up and immediately tell me that he wasn't going to eat today. It was so stressful. Finally a light bulb went off and one morning I told him that would be fine. Eat or don't eat---it didn't matter a bit to me. To say he was confused would be an understatement!

    It took awhile of him testing me, but telling him that he had the power over eating or not just took the wind right of his sail. He almost always ended up eating, especially when I got his little sister's food ready and didn't offer him anything.

    Why do you think your daughter is doing this? For Nathan, I think it was a combination of things. He didn't want to mess around with blood sugar checks and a shot, for one. He also wanted the upper hand and knew that food was a way to get it. As soon as I took away the battle (you must eat vs. I will not eat) he looked at food in a more friendly fashion. I think if you can determine the motivation behind her avoiding food then you will be able to figure the way to get her to eat without a battle in the future.
     
  8. virgo39

    virgo39 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,691
    If it hasn't already been recommended, you might want to look at this book:

    Sweet Kids : How to Balance Diabetes Control and Good Nutrition with Family Peace

    This was a huge help to me after DD's dx.
     
  9. Jillian06

    Jillian06 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2011
    Messages:
    29
    Just a suggestion based on our experience, on days my DD does not have much appetite, we give Novolog post meal. Or if we overcalculated the insulin, we supplement with milk, chocolate milk in some cases.
     
  10. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    Food wars can be very difficult with young kids. They feel that its a way to control you by not eating. Especially, if they see that you are anxious about it or if you really start to push. I remember when Steven was on NPH at the beginning and we really had to get carbs into him to feed the insulin. I did have to offer lollipops a few times or get some juice into him.

    We've always had set meal times in this family though for everyone. I dont want to be a short order cook and treat everyone like their at a restaurant and can eat what they want, when they want so Ive always given a 5 minute warning before meals start so that Steven could prepare to stop playing his game or come in and get washed up. Then I try and make meal times a happy relaxed time for him and everyone and Ive always offered a dessert after the meal, at least for lunch and dinner. Usually a cookie but this is after the meal is eaten.

    Do you think your daughter is having a problem with the shots so is avoiding eating to not get them?
     
  11. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Yes it is, as long as you are not feeding the Levemir. If you have the dose correct, then she should not have to eat to keep from going low. The basal dose (Levemir) should have nothing to do with food. It sounds like maybe you need discuss with her endo about lowering her dose. Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2011
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    I agree. The, "not eating is not an option" comment struck me as odd. The worst possible situation to find yourself in is to be getting into a power struggle because you have to feed the insulin. If your long acting is set right you won't need to struggle with her over meals.

    Good luck!
     
  13. Andy'sMom

    Andy'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    295
    I feel for you. Yes, we've been there also as we use NPH during the day and have since he was less than a year old. I agree with previous posters to adjust levemir so that not eating is an option and your child can then choose. As a toddler, one of the few items that a child is supposed to control is if they eat and what they eat so taking that away is hard on a child (and parents!).
     
  14. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,189
    I apologize if this was already suggested, but have you considered changing to lantus? You may not have as much of a peak with that. Or is pumping an option? That gives you, by far, the best flexibility over basal insulin.

    We always bolused after a meal when we were on MDI. I don't want to encourage you to go against your dr's advice, but that's what we did because, even at age 7 and 8, his eating was very unpredictable. IMO, it's better than fighting over food.

    I also agree with others that she should not *have* to eat...some adjusting may be in order. Kids are "programmed' to resist you if you say they have to do something. Plus, you don't want her to grow up ignoring her hunger cues. It's better to change the insulin to match the diet instead of the other way around.

    As was suggested by someone else...reverse psycholgy works WONDERS with my 4 year old! And It really does eliminate a lot of fighting with him on many, many fronts. I say, "don't lay down in your bed! Stay up!" Which immediately gets him into his bed, which is the desired result. Or, "don't put on this shirt! I'm saving it for later. Don't wear it today." He knows I'm joking, so it turns into a laughing moment, instead of frustration.

    This is how I work it specific to food. I divide the food in question in half on the plate. I designate one half (usually the bigger half) as "mine" and tell him not to eat it. It looks very delicious ("it's my favorite!") and that I'll get it in a few minutes (find an excuse not to take it right now). He almost always goes straight for the thing I told him not to eat. It's a trick I read about in a book once. I thought it would never work, but it does! Perhaps not all the time, but it helps.

    Sometimes I just have to find a way to make him think something is his idea.

    I also like what lynn said about acting like it doesn't matter to you one way or the other. This eliminates the power struggle/manipulation part of the equation.

    Good luck! I hope you can figure it out quickly. Food wars are NO FUN! :D:D:D
     
  15. alnoll

    alnoll Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Everyone has had great ideas! I believe that a trip to the endo is in order! I think because she has recently started this food control issue that we may need to adjust levimer. As for why this is happening, I'm baffled, nothing major has changed in her life. I do think she might be rebelling a little as she met another little girl with diabetes who is on a pump and now she really wants one. I guess her levimer needs could be changing but i'm surprised that they are going down not up. I will definitely be trying some reverse psychology on her!

    AmberLynn
    mother to Ania dx 2009 now 4 on novolog and levimer
     
  16. lynn

    lynn Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    3,112
    Her levemir needs could have been lower than you thought the entire time. If refusing to eat is a new thing then you could have been feeding the levemir a little bit in the past without knowing it and now it is becoming obvious.

    I wish you luck with getting peace to return to your mealtime.
     
  17. Jilleighn

    Jilleighn Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2009
    Messages:
    746
    My daughter was dx at 18months and when she was dx she was only on 2 unit of lantus a day + novolog. At that time our endo said if she see lows when fasting/not eatting her lantus is to much and reduce by .5 units a day until they are gone. Lantus/Levemir is a Basal insulin they are not used to bring down blood sugars they are used to just keep it steady. It sounds like she is having to much of her basal insulin if she is going low. You shouldnt have to feed the insulin. Do you check her in the middle of the night? Whats her bed time blood sugar? Middle of the night and waking? if there is a drop in those you need to lower the night dose too.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice