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First time low. Quite scary for us.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by JeremysDad, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Tweety8

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    My 4 year old (and she did this when she was 3 too), lays on the floor if she is low. It happens everytime. She puts her cheek on the hardwood floor and just lays there. NOt that this happens a lot, but I have noticed this is her pattern of a symptom if she has a low during the daytime hours.
     
  2. Tweety8

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    White frosting!! Buy cans of it from the store and keep it around. Soda too. That works really quick and well for my daughter.
     
  3. JeremysDad

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    Like Boo said in his post above, we have also started stashing 15-19 grams of quick-acting carbs all over the place. I bought a box of fruit snacks at Sams club last week. There are 72 packages in the box. Really easy to put in various places. The trick is... how do I prevent my 16 year old from "finding them". I found 2 packages in the refrigerator yesterday that had no contents in them. The packages was there but the fruit snacks inside were long gone. Of course, no one owned up to it.

    Jeremy had his second low this evening. What was weird about it was that he complained of feeling a little dizzy and his heart was racing but his BG was 92. I'm surprised that he felt the way he did at 92. I know everyone is different but perhaps in my case, feeling the way he did so early on as his BG was on its way down could prevent a serious low since he can feel himself going low before it really hits him.
     
  4. wilf

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    He was running high for awhile, so he'll be feeling "low" at higher BG levels than he will later on once he's closer to your target range.

    If he is very sensitive like my DD is, then he will actually get low feelings when BG is dropping quickly (even if he is still in range). I made it a policy to always test when DD felt low, as it helped her learn to distinguish her low symptoms. I learned to not assume that just because BG levels were "normal" that there was no issue - as often as not the "normal" results were followed by a real low a short while later.

    How were BG levels the last day? Is the increase in the Lantus helping?
     
  5. hrtmom3

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    Your right, first low can be scary. Sounds like you both did a great job handling it. Glad he was home. Just a thought......is his friend or friends aware of how to recognize lows if he was to need help. One thing I did appreciate when Tim was first dxd at 12, was one of his friends took great interest in wanting to know what to look for to help him.
     
  6. Toni

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    I am very glad he was able to feel and identify the low, treat it timely. That is so important. I do not worry about glucagon if she is 50. She has been and will be 50. We check often and do check a few hours after meals (which is when she will have a problem with IOB causing her to drop more than we have calculated). Some kids can have more of a problem when they hit 50, maybe even using the Glucagon. So you do have to watch and be careful. And of course exercise; still amazed at how fast and quick they can drop during and after exercise.
     
  7. 2type1s

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    Yep....lows are scary!!! I remember Morgan's first low was in the middle of the night, at home...just a few days after home from the hospital. I was having pre-term labor, and that made it worse! I had to go in the hospital to stop it...crazy stuff.
    It's weird, though....I can't remember Zoe's first low! We've had some scary ones over the years.....seen many 20's. It's weird though, I've seen my girls walking around and talking normally in the 30's, but incoherent in the 50-60's. I really think that it is the speed of the drop that causes the scariest reactions (I've seen both drop over a 100 points in less than 30 minutes). Both girls have reported feeling low at 100ish, we check, and I say you're fine. Then 20-30 minutes laters, CRASH! I've learned now to go ahead and treat those low feelings to ward off a severe low.
    As far as keeping the treats for the D kids, we have an area on the kitchen counter that is just for lows. We have juice boxes and glucose tabs in the bathroom drawer between the girls bedrooms. The older non-D knows not to touch it. Kids that come to our house and beg for juice boxes and candy are told that this is medicine for Morgan and Zoe and they cannot have it. (Skittles are cheaper and just as good as Glucose tabs for bringing up lows- but I do have to hide some ffrom my husband!)
     
  8. JeremysDad

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    Thats the problem. At 13, it's hard to know for sure how his friends or their parents will react if Jeremy has a severe low. We cannot rely on anyone BUT Jeremy to identify and treat his lows. Once we feel more confident letting him stay overnight at a friend, we will instruct their parent on how to use the Glucogon. It's good to know that it might never be used but you never know.
     
  9. Emma'sDad

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    Wow, I'd like to say that this brings back memories and can sympathize with you, but after almost 5 years of doing this, I totally forget when was Emma's first low and how we reacted. I do remember Emma's first serious low where she was just standing up with hardly any response from her other than her automatic response to drinking juice. Her meter at that point just said LO. Drink drink drink!!

    Welcome to CWD, I am sorry that you had to join our group, but it's nice to see another male join our CWD Dad's clan! See you around!
     

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