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First Lows

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mntgrl, Dec 15, 2014.

  1. mntgrl

    mntgrl Approved members

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    Our daughter was diagnosed on December 1st, so the past 2 weeks has been about trying to regulate her numbers (which I've learned from many is more an art than science). She had her first low on Saturday, 66, able to bring her back into range (her range is 100-180) with juice.
    I just took her 3am blood sugar and she was 99, so just below her normal range. Since we have mostly seen her in the 200-300 range, this kind of freaks me out. I gave her 2 oz of juice and am waiting 15 min to recheck. I think the thing that is worrying me most is that it is the middle of the night and if she drops low, I won't have any idea. And I know 99 isn't "low" but since her numbers have always been high, it feels worrisome.
    Are lows at night very common? Does a pattern often get established early on with something like this?
     
  2. MamaC

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    I would say lows at night are not UNcommon. It's why we check throughout the night, in the absence of a continuous glucose monitor. I've never noticed any pattern; if there WAS a pattern, we'd be able to prevent the lows from happening.

    99 is not worrisome on its own. If it's a 99 headed down, it could be an issue. But we only catch that through testing and/or a CGM.

    Early days is not the time to expect to see everything you'll ever see with T1. It's all new, it's a little baffling, and a little shocky. This is a great place to seek support...because we've ALL been freaked out by that first post-diagnosis 99.
     
  3. librarylady

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    It sounds like you are doing exactly the right thing. Good job mom! And yes those first lows or even hints of lows are very frightening. With time and experience you will start to feel more confidence and you will get a better idea of how your daughter's body reacts to lows and to treatment. This gets easier! While you will always be concerned about lows it will be amazing to you some day how calm and composed you will be when treating a low and how it will become a matter of routine. My daughter was also 7 years old when she was diagnosed. I will always remember those first lows and how scary they were. She is now 15 and we have successfully treated many lows (and highs and everything in between). You will get the hang of this. :)
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    99 isn't low at all BUT your daughter may report feeling bad at 99 (when she's awake) because the brain adapts to the circulating glucose it has and for a while now your daughter, like any newly dxd' kid, has had a recent history of elevated glucose.

    Meanwhile, we'll all sit here and tell you that 99 isn't low and an awake 66 is barely low and not to panic, but your daughter, even on insulin, has been in the 200s she's quite possibly going to "feel" low and demand juice. All of which is pretty much par for the course in the first few weeks.

    Lows can happen anytime, but as random as diabetes can be there are things you can think about to anticipate if your actions might be increasing the likelihood of a low at night. Knowing the duration and peak time of all your insulins is important, knowing that a hot bath after an injection can speed that up, knowing that foods vary in when they hit the system and how long they last can help you time insulin to your advantage. Then there are the things like serious exercise that can have an impact on bg then and then again hours later - in other words no, there's no establishing a pattern of nighttime lows (like a bad habit) but there are choices that you and your daughter can make to somewhat anticipate nighttime lows and help prevent them.

    If I haven't already, I highly recommend Ragnar Hanas' book, http://www.amazon.com/Type-1-Diabetes-Children-Adolescents/dp/185959350X There are many editions of this book, most recent I think is the 2012. Awful cover, great book.
     
  5. nebby3

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    I felt the same way when my dd first dipped below 100 because they had told me to keep her between 100-200. But the truth is those are not low numbers. Non D people would be 99 all the time and could wake up with a 66 with no problem. I would treat a 66 particularly if you don't have a CGM but just for your peace of mind know that those are not really low. There will be a time 60s won't phase you at all and you will likely see much lower numbers too.
     
  6. mntgrl

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    Thanks for all the input :) It is reassuring to hear others were anxious at the first low~ I'm not typically neurotic about things but things is particularly stressful at times!
     
  7. sszyszkiewicz

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    There are lows, and then there are <insert deep bellowing vice> LOOOOOWS. You will see lows often, but <insert deep bellowing vice> LOOOOOOOOWS not often.

    if you are able and your DD is willing, you might want to look into a CGM. You see people here taking about Dexcom. My personal opinion is they should not let us leave the hospital without one. It completely changed how we dealt with T1D. Before the CGM it was like being forced to do math homework without a calculator, with lots of long division problems. After a CGM its like you get to use a calculator to do math homework. It evens the playing field,and T1D does not play fair.
     
  8. Christopher

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    Welcome but sorry you have to be here.

    If you are worried about her going low at night, the simple solution is to check her at night. Then you will know exactly what her number is and you can deal with it.

    You also asked if lows at night are "common". Just remember that nothing about Type 1 is usually "common". But in general, yes, your child's bg will probably fluctuate between the time they go to bed and the time they wake up. That is why I check my daughter several times throughout the night, every night since she was diagnosed. Over the past 7+ years I have caught many, many, many lows as well as highs. But since I am checking I can identify them and treat them and get her back in range.
     

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