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Ever had to use the Glucagon Emergency Kit???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ben'sMommy, May 24, 2006.

  1. zookpr

    zookpr Approved members

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    We have had to administer the glucagon shot to our daughter, Lydia, 5 times since her diagnosis 16 months ago. Each time she was in a full grand mal seizure and it took about 10 - 15 minutes for the shot to pull her out. She never threw up but, she did complain that she had a terrible headache and her stomach felt ill afterwards. Fortunately, I work at the school she attends so I was there the day she passed out and seized in class. I have never been so scared in my life. I sympathize with the rest of you that continually check on you children! Sometimes I wonder how I actually get any sleep when I realize how often I checked on the kids at night! :D
     
  2. spartanmom

    spartanmom Approved members

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    Wow, after reading these replies I am going to practice with my glucagon tonight!! My son was dx'd 11/05 and thankfully we have never had to use the glucagon. I just hope if we ever do need to use it I can react as fast as all of you did, hopefully I won't fall apart and not be able to react!!! He has had some low low's (30-40's) but he is always alert and talking. I was wondering if any of you know what your kids bloodsugar was when you had to use the glucagon, was it really low or is it different with each child. Can you usually expect seizure activity with the need for glucagon? All of this really, really scary!! But I guess being prepared is the only way to deal with this.
     
  3. EmmasMom

    EmmasMom Approved members

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    I have never had to use glucagon, and only pray that I'll never have to. If I ever find Emma seizing in the night I am certain that I will never sleep again... ever. She has been as low as 29 on one occasion, (caught it during a night time test), and in the 30's a handful of times, almost always during a nap. She is very limp and has a glazed look in her eyes when she's been in the 30's. That's scary enough for me!
    Luckily since we started pumping severe lows are few and far between.

    My husband had a 22 BG one night, and was able to test and treat himself. Good thing because I was in Europe at the time. :eek:
     
  4. maverickmom (Kerri)

    maverickmom (Kerri) Approved members

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    My daughter Shannon, almost 16, has had 2 seizures in 10yrs of having diabetes. Both times were first thing in the morning, from (her endo and I think) prolonged lows during the night. Both times, I rolled her onto her side first, then gave her the shot, BEFORE checking the bg (it takes the glucagon up to 20mins to kick in.) At that point, getting her to come to was far more important than knowing what her number was. I didn't want to waste any time.
    The first time she seized, at age 7, she was on NPH and R (Lantus, humalog etc were not available yet, and kids her age weren't typically put on pumps). She was sitting on the couch and just started looking "off"...next thing I know, she's having a full blown seizure. She came to within about 10mins or so. That time, we called 911 since it was the first time, and they wanted to take her to the ER for observation. So we went, and she spent 4hrs there. It took her all day to feel better...glucagon can make you feel terrible and is taxing on the body.
    The next time, she was age 9 and newly pumping. She had come downstairs for breakfast and I was getting her something to eat, when I heard a 'thunk' on the floor. By the time I got to her she was already seizing. She, like the other child mentioned earlier, was cyanotic (bluish) around the mouth so I turned her on her side to open the airway (which you're supposed to do anyway when you give the shot), and gave her the shot. It took about 10mins or so for her to come around that time too.

    You wouldn't want to use the glucagon on a conscious person unless they are just so incapacitated that they can't help themselves. In that case you should try the gel first. It takes about the same amount of time to work.

    By the way...if that huge kit needle makes you squeamish and hesitant, you CAN use an insulin syringe in place of those huge glucagon needles, and give the shot subcutaneously. It works the same. The first seizure, we gave the shot intramuscularly with the kit needle (it left a huge, painful bruise), and the second time, we did it subcutaneously with an insulin syringe. It took the same amount of time to come around both times.
    We keep a 1cc syringe rubberbanded to the glucagon kit along with a tube of glucose gel.

    Hope this helps!
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2006
  5. Pam

    Pam New Member

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    Sad business sometimes

    We have used the glucagon when my son was lowish during a bout of stomach flu -- two units, and he is 45 lbs. It helped alleviate my anxiety about if I need it in an emergency also. It brought his blood sugar up in twenty minutes.

    I cannot help but cry when I read about people having children go into seizures. What a hard job we have!
     
  6. Pepperstone

    Pepperstone New Member

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    Been there...

    My daughter, Hadar (now almost 6), was diagnosed about two years ago, and we have helped her stay very healthy the entire time (great A1Cs), but something as simpe as a missed snack can knock everything off. My wife and my daughter were at the Zoo for a Sunday school program, and they have missed her afternoon snack. Hadar came home hot, tired and hungry. We began to prepare a snack for her, but she rapidly became listless and unconscious. We tried to wake her up, give her ice cream. Nothing. Just sound aslepp. So, we got out the Glucagon, followed the directions, and gave her half the dose (per our doctor's instructions), and called the EMTs. They came very quickly. Not long after they came, my daughter snapped out of it and we gave her some juice and something to eat. The EMTs said that if there was no normal reason for the episode, that they would have taken her to the hospital. In our case, the missed snacks and the extreme nature of the day were an obvious explanation.

    We were also really glad that Hadar was not aware of the huge needle going into her thigh. She does not mind the small ones, but man, that one look ginormous in comparison.
     
  7. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    This was a great thread, because I was about to throw and old glucagon out and decided I want to practice mixing. I'm glad I did because it's not like drawing insulin up, it's a bit trickier. This was good practice.
     
  8. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    YIKES 5 times in 16 months. Have you considered getting a different pediatric endocrinologist and having an alternative opinion/approach to the insulin therapy she's on now?
     
  9. zookpr

    zookpr Approved members

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    The practice we are using recently got a new endo and they are talking about putting Lydia on the pump. Last month we attended our first pump education class! She has her next visit in a few weeks and we were told that we would be able to get her pump then. I hope so, because her numbers are so hard to keep under control. We count carbs, and she uses novolog and lantus. Now we have Trevor starting on the same routine! :eek:
     
  10. HappilyMarried2

    HappilyMarried2 New Member

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    The Kit!

    I used it oops his school had to use it and i didnt like it thats why we try to keep him leveled at all times didnt work asap but then again they told me the teacher didnt shake it enough so make sure if you use it to "shake well" he has had lows 40 and 28 and really scary never wanna go through that again. He isnt aware of his lows or highs yet so he really cant tel me about a good day or bad day ....just wanting him to open up thats all so if anyone has a son the same age ley me know please thanks....maggie
     
  11. shirley83006

    shirley83006 Approved members

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    you mentioned that they have it in one shot. i just got mine and it is in two vials. one in a liquid and one in powder in which you have to mix.
     
  12. Adinsmom

    Adinsmom Approved members

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    Thanks for bringing this thread back up

    Our glucagon is in 2 vials also. Powder in one and saline in the other in a red plastic case.
     
  13. monkey97

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    We havent had to use it yet, but Phillip has had a low of 1.1 mmol :eek: (20 in the US numbers). The doctor was surprised he didnt go unconscious with that. He was still quite normal and lucid and able to eat jelly beans for it.
     
  14. lisa-j

    lisa-j Approved members

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    Oh my now then where do i start,
    My son is 8yrs been diabetic for three years now and i must enquire about the emergancy kit as we havn't got one or even been offered one,
    If truth be known we had never heard of it before now.

    We have had a couple of bad experiances with my sons sugars.
    Once it was the middle of the night and i wokeup to a wierd noise coming from his bedroom, i ran in there and panick struck me as he was having a fit, the thing is i wasn't too sure what to do first for the best. luckly his dad was around and knew what to do. :)

    And another terrifieng time was not too long ago, he was poorley and wasn't eating much and kept on being sick. we thought it was a stomach bug and just kept on giving him plenty of fluids.
    But as time whent on he became so pale and lethargic we took him straight into the hospital and right away he were put onto a cardiac monitor and drips, :confused:
    They said that he had few keytones, and was 25% dehidraited and his sugars were so high his meter couldn't take his readings . :eek:

    The thing is im so so scared and worried because he is still going up an down all the time. :(
     
  15. Ben'sMommy

    Ben'sMommy Approved members

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    Oh my gosh!
    I'm horrified that you were never told about this. :eek:
    You should get on to your D team IMMEDIATELY and demand an explanation. :mad:
    It is very irresponsible of them. I'm just thankful that you have gotten through the last few years alright.

    http://www.novonordisk.com.au/Images/Diabetes_CMI/GluHcmi6.pdf#search="Glucagon Hypokit"

    http://www.novonordisk.co.in/documents/article_page/document/Glucagen.asp

    These are links explaining the Glucagen Hypokit.
    It is intended for use if blood glucose drops very low and the patient is unresponsive or unable to be treated orally.
    It is an injection of the hormone Glucagon which is responsible for raising blood glucose.

    I hope you find these links helpful.
    I would advise you to get a few of these hypokits IMMEDIATELY. I am furious that you were never told about them!

    Best of luck.
    xxx
     
  16. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    If your child is on insulin, you should be informed about using Glucagon. It is a horomone that in injected when you child is seizing or unconscious and you cannot get him to eat.

    This web site is a wealth of information. You can read about Glucagon here:
    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0n_022.htm.
     
  17. lisa-j

    lisa-j Approved members

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    Thankyou so much for the links and also the answers to what it actually is i really am greatfull to you all :)
     
  18. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

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    Today a second glucagon came in the mail (I'm newly diagnosed) and my mother was amused to note that the glucagon says that the prescription can be refilled every two months, and can be refilled 99 times per year.:D
     
  19. Ben'sMommy

    Ben'sMommy Approved members

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    Just bumping this up for TreysMom. :)
     
  20. rickst29

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