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Endo visit today

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by SandiT, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. kirsteng

    kirsteng Approved members

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    Oh no! Poor little thing... :(

    How will she be treated - antibiotics? Maybe that's what's been driving up her bg's?
     
  2. SandiT

    SandiT Approved members

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    Yes, she's allergic to eurythro, so she's on amoxicillin. I'm sure it was what was driving up her BG, I just haven't felt comfortable with the ways we were told to deal with the BG highs.

    The endo I'm not comfortable with wanted me to treat it like Kira wasn't eating, even though she's eating fine (cause it's her lung bothering her, not her belly).
     
  3. SandiT

    SandiT Approved members

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    So, just an update. We had social worker visit yesterday and dietician visit.

    The dietician was very impressed with our "varied" diet and said we're doing a great job. Apparently we're not on a "carb restricted diet" after all. :D

    Now we're waiting for the appt. to get the pump to start our saline trial.
     
  4. missmakaliasmomma

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    I don't really understand why you would think you need to be on a cgm in order to use a pump. I'd much rather rely on myself getting up and testing my daughter in the middle of the night than rely on a device that could malfunction. I know a mother of twins and they are both diabetic and my daughter's age and the mother told me that after a couple months of having one, she doesn't use it anymore because it was more inaccurate than it was accurate and it made her go crazy. I'm ok with getting up at night to test her just so she doesn't have to wear something else on her body.
     
  5. missmakaliasmomma

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    Reading through this post I was trying to figure out why the lows for you kept happening even with adjusting the insulin and I just found it. Please please please stop giving your daughter NPH. It caused my daughter's sugar to go into the 20s twice because it peaks when it wants to. It's a horrible insulin. I don't mean to scare you (if I'm doing that) but we tried to get our dr to listen to us when we told her it wasn't working and they never listened. I eventually switched insurances because there was a new ped endo near me that had just opened up and I couldn't stand not being listened to by my daughter's dr. They made it seem like it was all our fault but in reality, it was the insulin. As soon as we saw the new dr, she put my daughter on lantus. It was so much better. She was on lantus for about a year and then we decided to pump about a month ago. Her new (not really new, we've been seeing her for 1.5 years but we saw the other horrible dr for 2 years prior to that) dr told us she does not put children on NPH ever. NPH is known to cause a lot of lows. Please consider lantus/levemir.
     
  6. Michelle'sMom

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    There are quite a few here who successfully & very happily use CGMs with their children, & find them very accurate. CGM use is not just for overnight safety. It makes adjusting pump settings much easier, & helps you see the effects of food & activity in real time. I test my dd overnight even with the CGM, but I can't be with her 24/7. She doesn't feel many lows, so CGM is her safety net.

    I know of a long-time peds endo (also a T1 for 40+ years) who believes all CWDs should be on CGM from dx, with or without pumps.
     
  7. MommaKat

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    Everything above - that is why I would prefer to have my child on a pump also on cgm. We have experienced amazing accuracy with the dexcom G4. Sure, we were able to pump with success when medtronic cgm did not work for her. But I knew that without basal testing I really did not know what was going on with her glucose levels. I think we all get to a point where we think we know what's going on by doing pre and post meal checks, night time checks etc. Then the CGM opened our eyes to an insane amount of yoyo-ing and - for us - the truly inaccurate / upside down nature of the basal pattern my daughter was started on. With the accuracy of cgm we've been able to fine tune basal rates, I:C ratios etc that match her needs far better than was ever achieved with the endo center was assisting us that first few months after Dx or after pump start.

    At 13, my daughter won't go anywhere without cgm - she might take a very short lived pump break, but wants no breaks from cgm. The benefits are too numerous to list, though Michelle'sMom comes close. I have to agree with her doctor friend who's T1D in feeling that every child should have access to cgm from diagnosis. Oh, and we still do at least one night check. But, there are nights, especially following my recent surgery, when I knew that dex was reliably tracking within less than +/- 5% that I could safely let myself sleep, trusting I'd wake to audible alarms I can hear for any lows or highs. We all desperately needed that.

    SandiT - how is Kira doing now? Is she starting to feel somewhat, or hopefully even more, back to normal?
     
  8. SandiT

    SandiT Approved members

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    Kira's doing okay. I think she's sort of just feeling it most when she's upset still. My greatest concern is that, if it's this hard for her now, what will it be like when she's a teen?

    The Lantus switchover seems to be going really well, though. That's good news. :)
     
  9. missmakaliasmomma

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    First, I don't like your doctor lol. Correcting at 300 is too high to me. We check ketones at 240 and would correct around then, sometimes lower too.

    there's no reason why she can't have regular popsicles. Just get the no sugar added ones. They're like 9g for one. Much better than the "sugar free" ones. I have no idea if they hurt your stomach though but alot of people say they do. It's always best to stick with natural sugar even though it doesn't make sense a lot of the time.

    I deal with my daughter's diabetes almost 100% of the time but my husband is behind me ( because I honestly dont think he'd want to be in my shoes and feel responsible for everything lol) I don't think this has anything to do with your daughter's t1d rather than the problems you might've had before. It might be bring up his stress level (Im sure it has because thats what it did to me)

    Im not saying hes bad or anything but people handle things so differently. Do not second guess yourself, you need to stick up for yourself. Keeping your daughter home for a fever is most certainly what you should do! I wouldn't let my daughter go either. Haven't we all felt how horrible it is to be sick and not be home? I dont want to put my daughter through that.
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    I agree. When my daughter's sick, she needs about double her normal dosages.
     

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