- advertisement -

Elevated Thyroid antibodies?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by sariana, Jun 6, 2013.

  1. sariana

    sariana Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    Messages:
    422
    At least I think that is what the results said. My daughter had some blood drawn at her last appointment for the first time since diagnosis. I received the card, but the handwriting is difficult to read. However I think it says that her tests were normal, but her thyroid antibodies were elevated. Thyroid function is normal. I have a call into the office to verify if I am reading it correctly, but also to figure out what the heck it means? Could it mean that she may end up with celiacs? or another thyroid illness....

    Thanks for any input!

    *grrr... I misspelled Thyroid in title.... *sigh*
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2013
  2. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    Thyroid antibodies indicate that she is at risk of developing autoimmune thyroid disease. When you say end up with another thyroid illness - do you mean that she already has an existing thyroid illness.
     
  3. sariana

    sariana Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2007
    Messages:
    422
    I do apologize for the confusion. I meant another illness. She is only type 1 diabetic at the moment.

    The endo did call me back and she explained that they are starting to monitor antibodies as well as thyroid function. She did not seem to worried, but wants us to watch for symptoms of Hypothyroidism and she will have more blood drawn.
     
  4. greenpalm

    greenpalm Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Messages:
    171
    My husband has both Addison's Disease and Type 1. (He's got LADA, but it really is a form of type 1)


    http://www.joslin.org/info/genetics_and_diabetes.html

     
  5. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    4,925
    People with thyroid antibodies usually do develop thyroid disease (unlike diabetes antibodies, where most people who have a diabetes antibody don't develop diabetes). There is one antibody that is higher risk for Hashimoto's and one for Grave's, but both of the thyroid antibodies put a person at higher risk of both of those diseases.

    When a person is known to be antibody positive for thyroid disease, it means that the person's TSH should be checked at least twice per year. On average it takes 2-3 years from an antibody positive test until the person develops actual thyroid disease.

    I am one of those weird cases- I'm consistantly negative for thyroid antibodies and I developed thyroid disease anyways.

    Having thyroid disease or thyroid antibodies in addition to type 1 diabetes slightly raises the risk of some other autoimmune diseases, but not by very much, compared to just having type 1 diabetes. It does increase the odds that that person's diabetes is caused by the polyendocrine type 2 gene.
     
  6. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    I was tested for three antibodies I was positive for Anti-TPO antibodies, TSH receptor antibodies and 1.3 Thyroglobulin antibodies. I was positive for the 1st two. I have antibody positive type 1 and Hashimoto's.

    Does that mean I have polyendocrine type 2 ?
     
  7. ChristineJ

    ChristineJ Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    303
    Polyendocrine type 2 has to include Addison's disease and either Hashimoto's, Type 1, or both. :cwds:

    Christine
     
  8. greenpalm

    greenpalm Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2013
    Messages:
    171
    But there is more than one kind of polyglundular autoimmune syndrome. So, you could have one of the others.
     
  9. ChristineJ

    ChristineJ Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2010
    Messages:
    303
    From Wikipedia: "In medicine, autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes, also called polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PGAS),[1] are a heterogeneous group[2] of rare diseases characterized by autoimmune activity against more than one endocrine organs, although non-endocrine organs can be affected.

    There are three "autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes", and a number of other diseases which have endocrine autoimmunity as one of their features.", and

    "Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APECED or Whitaker's syndrome)
    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2 (Schmidt's syndrome)
    The most serious but rarest form is the X-linked polyendocrinopathy, immunodeficiency and diarrhea-syndrome, also called XLAAD (X-linked autoimmunity and allergic dysregulation) or IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, and enteropathy, X-linked). This is due to mutation of the FOXP3 gene on the X chromosome.[3] Most patients develop diabetes and diarrhea as neonates and many die due to autoimmune activity against many organs. Boys are affected, while girls are carriers and might suffer mild disease."

    "Other diseases featuring polycrine autoimmunity:

    Chromosomal abnormalities (Down's syndrome) increase the risk of endocrine autoimmunity
    POEMS syndrome - the E is for endocrinopathy; the cause is a paraprotein excreted by a plasmacytoma or multiple myeloma; other features are polyneuropathy, organomegaly (hepatomegaly and splenomegaly), M-protein (paraprotein) and skin changes.
    Several very rare diseases including Lupus and Addison's Disease."


    Polyendocrine Type 1 also involves Addison's.

    Christine
     
  10. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    I made a mistake I was positive for Anti-TPO antibodies and Thyroglobulin antibodies. Hopefully I don?t develop Addison's.

    TSH receptor antibodies are more a marker of grave's I think, but when my endo realized I had subclinical hypothyroidism she tested all three.

    I am one of many type 1 females with Hashimoto's.

    I know someone with Hashimoto's and addison?s and she has been told it is only a matter of time before she develops type 1. It was a teacher of mine so i don?t exactly want to email her and ask, but I?d be curious if she did.
     
  11. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,451
    are people with addison's usually thin? even when they are on the treatment ? how does the treatment for addison's work ?

    I heard that if you break a bone or something with addison's it can put you into crisis and you need emergency treatment. and you need emergency treatment for things like the flu.

    but the woman I know with it had three pregnancies and they were not even treated as high risk.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice