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Elementary School with no nurse? How?

Discussion in 'School and Daycare' started by laugh462, Mar 17, 2009.

  1. laugh462

    laugh462 Approved members

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    Due to budget cuts in Georgia, it is likely that my son, who will be in first grade next year, will not have a nurse or any trained person to help him with injections. I know that not having a school nurse is not that unusual, right? How do your kids manage? He's not on a pump (I've thought that he was too young to be so unsupervised with it, but perhaps that's my issue), and I just don't trust him to be able to calculate and adjust his dosage. Agh!! He does have a 504 plan this year and the school nurse (who has a type 1 daughter) has been just priceless. I can't believe we're going to lose her.:(

    The front desk clerk at the school is studying to be an LPN, but that is as close as I get for a backup.
     
  2. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    You don't need a nurse, just trained personnel. I would request the 504 now. Have the language written so that when you lose the nurse, it will still work. I would say 3-4 trained people, including classroom teacher, so that you know there is always at least one.
     
  3. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    I didn't have a nurse for my son.

    He always ate lunch from home. I indicated how much insulin would be needed and we had a chart for corrections. I left a syringe prefiled with 3 units more than what he needed in the office. He would push out the unneeded insulin and the adult would check to be sure it was correct.

    The adult was the school secretary or the principal.

    My son used an inject ease to give himself the shot.

    I never asked the office staff to give the shot, but they would have.

    A pump would be easier for adults at your son's school to use.
     
  4. DylanMurdock

    DylanMurdock New Member

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    Legally, Schools HAVE to provide a train nurse to assist your kids with injections, etc.

    I do not have any children of my own, But I am diabetic myself, and have had to deal with the same issue in a GED diploma school that I attended.

    At first, They tried telling me that I couldn't attend school if I showed any signs of keytones. Well, For being a 15 year old that has grown to reject insulin because of the large doses they had put me on once my body starting rejecting, I had keytones just about everyday. (Which is why I attended that school in the first place!)

    Having been told that, by the middle of the year marking period I had missed 74 days of school, So the school board from my district set up a meeting. I had told them I was not attending because I was being told not to come, Because of not having a trained nurse on hand.

    I ended up being thrown out of the school, Because of the cost of me attending, And not being able to attend because they wouldn't let me because of my diabetes.

    My mother, Being FURIOUS about me being denied education because of my diabetes, Went to visit a lawyer. That, Led to court for discrimination, and the school was FORCED to have a nurse on hand, And put an end to me not being able to attend the school.


    My suggestion is, If they won't provide a nurse for your son, Contact a lawyer from the American Diabetes Association, In some discrimination cases, it's free. Your son does not deserve to be put at risk, You know as well as I do how precious children are, They deserve the best of care, At home, and at school.
     
  5. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    There is nothing that says the school has to provide a NURSE. The school needs to provide diabetes-trained personnel.
     
  6. Gracie'sMom

    Gracie'sMom Approved members

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    Yes, legally it doesn't have to be a nurse. Just someone who is trained to do what your child needs to keep them safe in school. Ours is usually the secretary, when she is out it is the principal and there is one other person trained in the school also. We haven't had any problems with this. One of the mom's I know had a nurse come in from a nearby hospital to educate the staff. I am not sure if she had to pay for that service or not, though. For our school, my husband and I were responsible for training the school on what specifically to do, although they followed the 504 which is now a medical management plan in our district. The school did her injections for several months before we went on a pump, and they have even changed her pump site when it has come off, after being trained of course. You just need to make sure that whoever they assign is comfortable and will call you if he/she is unsure of anything.
     
  7. CAGrandma

    CAGrandma Approved members

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    You say you already have a 504 in place and that is priceless. If it says that the nurse will do such and such and the school no longer has a nurse, then it is up to the school to make sure that an alternative, acceptable plan is created and the 504 plan is modified.
    In some ways not having a nurse is an advantage. If there is a school nurse everyone figures that she is the one responsible for all diabetes care and no one else has to know anything. Without one it makes sense for the teacher, lunchroom aides, playground supervisors, librarian, office staff, etc. to be trained in basic diabetes care. And it is less likely that the kid will have to walk all across campus alone because they feel low to wait in the nurses office to have a BG check!
    The key is training - the nurse can do it and you might want to supplement that with training of your own on your child's diabetes, reactions, signs of lows and highs, etc.
    Even kids who can do their own BG checks and use their pump need adults who can oversee things and who will know what to do if something needs to be done.
    Oh, and pumps are great for younger kids. My grandson has been on one for 2 1/2 years (he is now 6 1/2) and he doesn't operate it himself at all but it is so very much easier for school staff to do than to do injections.
     

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