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Eating when high?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MichS, May 27, 2010.

  1. hawkeyegirl

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    It depends for us. We will almost always catch it on the CGM and be able to get a good correction and a healthy predose going before a meal. But those days where BG is just high and NOTHING is bringing it down, well, we're not going to starve him. On those days, I do try to keep things relatively low carb. I'll usually give him a BIG salad first to fill him up a bit, lots of Crystal Lite or Kool-Aid fun fizz, and then try to interest him in something like scrambled eggs with a piece of PB wheat toast. Maybe some blueberries or strawberries with Cool Whip on top. Basically as low carb as possible without getting him really P.O'd at me. ;)
     
  2. joan

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    Wow you guys are good. My son is a teen and will eat whenever he feels like it. At least he will take insulin but very rarely will wait to eat if his bs is high. Sometimes I think that he may be really hungry because the high glucose means he is basically peeing out all the nutrients from his last meal. Gotta love the big d.
     
  3. linda

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    Ummmm maybe for SOME people.............lol.......:rolleyes:



    I never make Em wait...correct bolus..move on....:cool:
     
  4. HBMom

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    Sometimes I try and get him to eat low/no carbs, but another thing I have tried (and to be honest, I don't know if it works) is to let him have a higher fat meal (burrito, pizza), because the spike is later and hopefully his blood sugar has come down by the time it hits him -does that make sense? I should try and monitor this some time - maybe I will get a chance over the summer??
     
  5. Darryl

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    Sometimes there's no choice, but there's also no getting around the fact that if you eat when high, BG just go higher before finally coming down which is not a good idea on a regular basis.

    Our daughter will avoid eating carbs whenever her BG is over 140 unless the CGM shows that it's falling at the time.
     
  6. Heather(CA)

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    Have you thought about it this way?:cwds: Just throwing it out there:cwds:

    Lets say your 250 at noon, so you give a correction and wait to eat until 1:30. Now you eat and your bg goes back up for almost 3 hours. NOW you have been high for the 1 1/2hours you waited AND another 3 hours for lunch that equals 4 1/2 hours.

    OR

    At noon your 250, you eat and take enough insulin needed to bring down bg and take care of the lunch carbs. Now your back down and holding in three hours total. So how are you high longer by going ahead and eating? You probably will go a little higher if you eat but you will spend MORE time in range by not waiting.

    Does that make sense?
     
  7. Heather(CA)

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    Maybe her correction ratio needs some adjusting?:confused: Or you can try correcting her to a lower number for that high. Like to 70 or 80 instead of 100 for example?:cwds:
     
  8. wilf

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    Did you say something?! Oh wow.. Me too!
     
  9. wilf

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    Dude, it works for you and that is good. :)

    But as a method of managing D in a child it is going to have severe limitations - in fact for most families would be a non-starter. You as a motivated adult KNOW why you're waiting for BG to come down, and have the patience and discipline to put up with a lack of food for a time.

    A child will not be able to rationalize or accept the wait (imagine a kid stuck high at 300 waiting to come down to 150), and will end up hating either the parents or the diabetes or both. Not good.

    We try to get DD to wait for a good solid prebolus period before eating when she's high. Also, having Apidra which kicks in faster has made these situations easier to handle.
     
  10. SarahKelly

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    oddly enough, we the parents, don't make Isaac wait but what I've found is that when he's over 200 he's not hungry and waits himself. So, he'll sit with us for the meal nibble on the low/no-carb foods and then be done in a short time. An hour or two later he'll ask for a snack, meaning his BG is down and he's finally hungry. I don't like this pattern, but it works right now for us. I don't like that he gets over 200 either, but I'm finding that with d this is part of it and no matter how perfectly things are done sometimes things just jump high/low for no understandable reason, especially with a 2 year old!
     
  11. Scribe

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    Except ... I was diagnosed at 8 mos and this is the approach that's been used since Day 1 (even during the days of Clinitest and one-shot-a-day regime of NPH with glass syringes.)
    So ... the idea that it poses some brutal hardship that kids can't tolerate is untrue in at least one case. And trust me, I'm not that special.
    Even so, everyone has to find the approach that works best and there are many different ways to manage D. I'm happy with how I do it and convinced it's a big reason I've basically fought D to a draw for 50 years.
    I'm hoping everybody has the same result no matter how they achieve it.
     
  12. wilf

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    Thanks for explaining how you come to your perspective.

    I'm not suggesting the wait until you're under 150 approach is a brutal hardship, but I think it is one that in many children would fuel resentment.

    The smorgasbord of insulins available to us today allow us to bolus and correct prior to meal-time. I certainly agree that when a child is way high at meal-time the thing to do is get a good prebolus going by giving the bolus/correction well before the meal.
     
  13. lynn

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    Pretty much exactly what I was going to say. If Nathan has to wait to eat because he is high then he will undoubtedly have a giant I-Hate-Diabetes-Meltdown. He gets very teary and crabby and impatient when high. So, I usually give some insulin and stall as much as I can and still be believable that I am a flighty, crazy mom!
     

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