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Dogs for Diabetics

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by foxa71, Nov 18, 2009.

  1. foxa71

    foxa71 Approved members

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    Anyone have or plan to apply for getting a diabetic dog? They have to be 12 years old to get one, but I plan on applying for Erin. The dogs can smell the chemical change in the child when they're going low, so they can wake them up.
     
  2. fredntan2

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    Be carefull.

    A few years ago or was it last year there was place "training " these dogs that wasn't legit.

    Does anyone remember name of place?
     
  3. foxa71

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    Oh really, I haven't heard that. The place down here is in Concord, CA, not too far from where we live. I know someone who got their dog from there, but I'll have to make sure that I check it out more to be super sure.:eek:

    Here's the site. http://www.dogs4diabetics.com/

    We're on the mailing list until she reaches the age to apply.
     
  4. Charlotte'sMom

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    I'd love to get a diabetic alert dog. However a) they're expensive and b) I don't really want an inside dog. Or an outside dog.

    But the idea of one is absolutely wonderful.
     
  5. Brynn

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    I do have a "diabetic alert dog" and I was one of those who was scammed. I do not want to post the name on here of the compnay, but if you are interested please please please research the company you are interested in. If you want any info about the company I went with, feel free to PM me.
     
  6. KRenee

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    I think Dogs4Diabetics is good, but don't have any personal experience. (My sister met someone who got a diabetes dog from them) We have a dog in training that we got through an independent breeder/trainer. (no age requirement). But the pup is young and it's taking alot of our time to continue the training to take it from the "find the scent in order to play' mode to the more mature "find the scent because it's my job" mode. I'm dd is 13 and is able to do alot of the training with just a little help from me.
     
  7. Sherry Wendi's Mom

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    Hubby and I have considered it. It will be a while though because the companies I've seen recommend it being the only dog in the household. We can depart from our Sleepy Dog (her name) just yet:(. I also don't think that it is as important for Wendi because she is not hypo-unaware right now. Definitely plan on trying to get one for her a year or two before she heads to college. I am not sure that I would be able to let her go without one. :eek: At least, I don't think so; but that is several years away.:D
     
  8. doratheexplora

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    Why do you have to be twelve? Four year olds can get seizure dogs.
     
  9. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    I think the alert dogs in California are legitimate. They are not charging a lot of money for those dogs, like some of the other organizations. I do wish some of the alert dogs were of the smaller breeds, like the bichon. I think it is a great idea.
     
  10. KatieJane'smom

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    My dd has an alert dog and we have two other dogs and a cat in the house. Be wary of anyone telling you that you can't have other dogs. There shouldn't be an age limit - depends on the maturity of the child.

    Our trainer was Liz Norris from www.pawsibilitiesunleashed.org but I've heard good things about dogs4diabetics, too.

    The other place you r talking about that Brynn doesn't want to mention is Heaven Scent Paws which is currently being sued by the State of Missouri's Attorney General. Another place to be wary of is Wildrose - the dogs they show in their brochure were actually trained by Liz Norris - Wildrose has nit actually trained any alert dogs yet.

    I will tell you that it is a ton of work for the handler but so worth it. You can check out my dd's website to learn more by clicking on the link below
     
  11. Christopher

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    I would be very careful. I would research the company you choose very thoroughly. There are unscrupulous businesses out there who will rip you off. I would also do a lot of research to find scientific proof that dogs can be trained to perform this function. I am sceptical that this is a practical solution for the majority of CWD or is any better than simply testing your child's BG. Just my two cents.
     
  12. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

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    I
    Not trying to dictate what others should or shouldn't do and YDMV, but I gotta agree with this. I just don't see why you'd need a dog when there are other just as good if not better ways, like regular testing, adjusting insulin to avoid lows and avoid unawareness, and CGM. And you don't have to walk CGMS or pick up after it. ;)

    And there's the issue that a dog is not just a tool but a big commitment and responsibility. You know, dogs get D too. If I got a D dog and it got D I would jump off a bridge. Seriously, though with all the other options and when you consider the costs and benefits, it doesn't seem like the best solution.

    That said though, if you want I dog then by all means, if you think it's the best thing for your family, I'm not poo pooing it at all. I jsut personally have enough to do without taking care of a dog too--can you tell I'm not a pet person? :p
     
  13. MamaC

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    IMO, it takes special people and special animals to yield a good alerting situation. Since the dogs can't say to us, "Yo! Rapid blood glucose drop beginning!" the amount of training is daunting for both human and animal. It can and does happen, but just be careful. In a perfect world, someday I'll be able to explore the possibility. I'd LOVE to be able to train and provide dogs for alerting purposes. Till then...

    My schnauzer (a bright breed) has alerting capabilities:

    "Huskies in my yard!"
    "Daisy and Kobi at the fence!"
    "Dad's home!"
    "Get of the stinkin' computer and play with ME!"
    "Timmy's in the well!"

    They all sound the same.
     
  14. foxa71

    foxa71 Approved members

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    Yes, we've considered all of these things for sure. I have owned a dog just once when I was in my 20's and know how time consuming they can be. Through college I had my own dog walking and sitting business.

    We don't have any dogs, but I did write to the company personally to ask if it is possible and they said as long as the other dog didn't pose a threat. My husband and I have decided that we will not get one though because we don't want that to be an obstacle.

    I think they limit the children to 12 years old because of the vast number of applicants. Could be more to that, I'm not sure. I would sleep sounder if I had another watchful eye. I wish it could be now. On their last mailer they said that out of 600 or so applicants they placed 72 dogs. So there's a huge chance we won't even get one.

    They did say it would be about $150 for the training classes which will last about two weeks. They are a non-profit organization. I know someone who knows a child with one of their dogs, so I'll make sure I contact them to see how it went as well.

    Christopher: I am thinking as she gets older and leaves the house or during times she's sleeping. If she were to get sleepy from a sudden low, the dog would be able to wake her up enough to treat herself or while she's asleep, if she were going very low, the dog could alert her or someone else in the house. Just an added benefit and a bonus additional family member to love.
     
  15. Christopher

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    I completely understand and you need to do what is best for your child and family. For me personally, I could not put that kind of trust into an animal, especially when I have seen no conclusive proof that it even actually works consistently. But I wish you the best of luck...:cwds:
     
  16. denise3099

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    oooh I just thought of how great it would be for a college kid! My dd's only 7 but I remember all the drunken passed out kids at college on Friday night and how great would that be to have a barking dog waking up the whole house instead of a CGMS alarm no one will hear?
     
  17. Melancholywings

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    We brought home a new puppy for DD a month before diagnoise - so I've had my hands full and right now I can't imagine the resposibility of another pet. Although had we been diagnoised first we would have gone with an alert dog.
    Our puppy's got a great sense of smell she's just a bit daft. I can't trust her with anything yet. And our old dog is excetionally smart but he wants to be my baby - not help DD. Another dog in the mix might send me running away to join the circus.
     
  18. denise3099

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    Can you train a new puppy--I mean if it's just a puupy it will be a while before you can really 'train" it to do anything useful. But at some point I'm wondering if you can call it to sit next toyour kid when she's low and treat her and give dog a treat. Until eventually it starts to respond when she's low, ya know. I'm sure it's more involved but I bet you could teach it to respond.

    Although working dogs take years to train and if you get your kids trained to do anything useful, like clean their rooms, you're ahead of the game. :rolleyes:
     
  19. mom 2 kids and dogs

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    I agree. A ton of work but so worth it. And we also have other dogs. No problem there. But my son will be taking his dog to college in a few years. That was the number one reason for getting the dog. He doesn't wake up at night when he is low.

    It's also my understanding that dogs4diabetics is reputable and Liz Norris has a good reputation among those she has trained for and helped to train. I was lucky enough to know of the law suits agains Heaven Scent Paws before buying our dog but fell right into the same mess with Beth Eden. In fact, I've been told she consulted with Michele R. of HSP about how to conduct her business! So avoid Beth Eden at all costs!! There have been complaints filed with the Attorney General offices in Texas and Oklahoma against them already. They moved from Texas to OK this month. Lawsuits to follow!
     
  20. foxa71

    foxa71 Approved members

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    Yeah, that's what I'm thinking. My daughter sleeps heavy at night and she won't wake up to alarms easily. I sleep with her now but it can't hurt to have an extra nose helping. I doubt she'll still be sleeping with me at 12 haha. I don't think I could trust a dog completely and still not take the usual precautions. I just think it can't hurt to have the extra help of a dog who's trained. We want to get a dog anyway, just might as well be a trained dog. Well, lots of time to figure that out. :D
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2009

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