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Does T1 make pregnancy harder on your body?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Charlotte'sMom, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. Charlotte'sMom

    Charlotte'sMom Approved members

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    First of all, I know that diabetes complicates everything. I read sixuntilme when she was pregnant and was surprised at all the extra test. I know being pregnant with T1 is hard.

    This is second hand information, but apparently a friend's doctor told her this should be her last baby (her 3rd) because pregnancy is hard on her body. Would T1 diabetes really limit the number of chlidren somebody has? Assuming they are doing all they can to manage their blood sugar, why would pregnancy be harder on a T1's body than on someone without it? (in the sense that it's bad for the mother to be pregnant again)

    I just hate to think that Charlotte's opportunities for motherhood may be limited by this wretched disease.
     
  2. mmgirls

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    well all i can say is that I have had a few freinds and relatives that have been told to not have any more babies because either their bodies took it too hard or their mind did.

    pregnancy is hard on any body.

    not very helpful, but I hope that I can be very present when my daughter chooses to start a family and be able to help her do her best to have a great pregnancy.
     
  3. sarahspins

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    I had a really long reply typed out and my browser ate it when we had an internet hiccup... but basically there's really no T1 specific reason to avoid future pregnancies *unless* you have certain diabetes related complications (though depending on what kind it might not be a deal-breaker) or you have developed a pregnancy related complication (such as eclampsia) that makes another pregnancy risky regardless of having T1. Some doctors will advice against having multiple C/S and will suggest stopping at 2 or 3, but I have several friends who have had more than that (5 and 6).

    My 3rd pregnancy was physically (and mentally) my easiest.. I say that because I had my two youngest fairly close together and I was more comfortable with my doctors and the hospital staff at that point - so I didn't feel as much like I was constantly being messed with by strangers... that was the part that I hated the most with my first and second. I had easy uncomplicated vaginal deliveries, with two inductions and one spontaneous (and precipitous!) labor.

    I don't want any more kids (3 is more than I can manage most days!) but no one has ever suggested I couldn't or shouldn't have more if I wanted to.
     
  4. Ali

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    As a T1, diagnosed as a teen, now an adult female who has three kids, two by birth, I think this is one of those tricky areas. I think if you have a younger Endo and you have had good control the answer might vary. After my second kid, my Doc said, "you are not having any more, right!". My pregnancies were tricky and scary. I did not worry about my own health but the impact of high and low BG levels on my developing fetus, my Dr worried about both of us. If you want to have kids I think it really depends on your own health at the time you want to have kids. But to get the best advice if I was doing it all over again I would go to the best endo group I could find and really talk about all my options before even starting, and maybe even check with more than one endo group. I would also recheck after every child as ones own health and the current thoughts about T1 and pregnancies change. For me when I was pregnant my first three months were quite hard but this was 25 years ago. But my next six were the easiest times I have ever had in terms of T1 management. But we did induce one child and the second had some issues during birth and after-but that all may have happened with out T1. For me the pregnancies did not impact my body in terms of eye or kidney function which is usually what they are worried about. :cwds::cwds:ali
     
  5. Ali

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    Just wanted to add to my prior post. I do not think it is that pregnancy is harder on a T1 than a non T1 but it is that pregnancy is in fact stressful on any body which is why typically younger women do a bit better and those without other health issues do better. T1 is a stress on the body, esp. the kidney. But with the control most T1s can have the level of stress on the organs may be no worse than the stress the overweight, or the older women or many other health issues may have on the body. So...yes you can not ignore that being a T1 does impact your body no matter how good your control. But it is very individual and with the better management techniques of today, the issue today are not the same as it was 20 years ago. Every women has to have a heart to heart with their Dr. But you just can not ignore the fact that being a T1 is a stress on the body that the non T1 does not have. :cwds:Ali
     
  6. mom2Hanna

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    About a week after Hanna was dxd I was telling a group of my girl scout moms and one of them told me for the first time that she was type 1. I had known her for 7 years at that point, she had been my sons kindergarten teacher and we were pregnant at the same time, we reconnected when our daughters went to school together. She has 2 healthy daughters and I do know that 2 was what they wanted, as far as I know, no one told her she couldn't have more.

    It was without a doubt the best thing that happened that month, to have someone tell me they were dxd at age 7 and were happy healthy with 2 children, 30 yrs later
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    As you note, it's a second hand telling of the tale, so relevant facts about the mom's overall health may have been excluded. But I do not find it hard to imagine that having 3 or more kids might make it really difficult to "do all they can to manage their blood sugar" and maybe her health isn't as good as someone like Kerri's.

    I figure by the time my dd wants babies there will be advances in medical care that will make Type 1 even less of a concern - though I think it highly unlikely that many people in the mid-21st Century will be having 4 or more children anyway :cwds:
     
  8. Tricia22

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    I'm a mother / baby nurse, and also a PWD.
    I just want to say one thing that we are ALWAYS telling our moms...
    EVERY conception is different, EVERY pregnancy is different, EVERY delivery is different, EVERY baby is different... whether you have had 8 babies or 1, whether each delivery is vaginal or cesarean sections, whether you breastfeed every baby or bottle feed - even if everything appears to be the same, I GUARANTEE it's not... no 2 are ever going to be the same, even for the same mom with the same docs, same delivery method, same hospital, etc.
    Nothing is ever the same, and there are NO guarantees with pregnancy, delivery, baby...
     
  9. sarahspins

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    Even Kerri had concerns (with her eyes) that lead her to have a scheduled C/S rather than going through labor, which was an appropriate decision IMO. There are always risks and considerations to be made and every case is going to be different.. but, I don't think anyone with T1 should grow up afraid to have kids of their own if they wanted to.
     

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