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Does Medicaid cover a nurse for daycare?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by maciasfamily, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. maciasfamily

    maciasfamily Approved members

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    My son has Medicaid (we're in TX) as his secondary ins. I know our primary ins doesn't, but does Medicaid cover a nurse to inject insulin at daycare during his lunch?

    I've received conflicting info.

    When I called Medicaid they said they may cover it if the doctor states he needs a nurse to go to his daycare to give insulin. The doctor's 'clinician' (I'm not sure what her correct title is) said she's never heard of it before, but she would ask around and see if the doctor would do this.

    My son and my 5 yr old go to an in-home daycare/pre-K who originally said they would be ok with giving him his insulin. Now they don't feel as comfortable doing it, because it can be a little confusing figuring out how much he should get, or when to round up or down based on his glucose level before he eats lunch. I love his daycare and they've both been going for almost 2 yrs, so I'm feeling torn as to what to do. They're the ones who suggested looking into Medicaid for a nurse.

    I've been going at his lunch time to give his injections during my lunch break, but this can't go on forever. I know it's still so new, and I'm hoping if a nurse comes in and shows them it's 'easy' they'll feel more comfortable. The daycare spoke with someone who got them scared saying they could inject him in the wrong place on his arm and cause damage, or he could get an infection, and then if they'd be blamed.

    I may have to consider another place for him, but it's going to be hard no matter what finding a new place who will do this.

    Any advice would be much appreciated. :)
     
  2. liasmommy2000

    liasmommy2000 Approved members

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    I have no idea. However why can't they call you and give you his reading and his carbs etc and you figure it out and tell them?

    As far as giving it in the wrong spot on the arm, that's kind of hard to do unless they are total idiots. And infections, as long there aren't a ton of filth/germs on his arm or their hands and they use an alcohol swab I can't imagine them giving him an infection. General cleanliness precautions such as washing their hands and using an alcohol swab should be more than sufficient. I've heard of pump sites getting infected (though even that is pretty rare I think) but never a shot site.

    Do your public schools have any kind of child care/preschool programs? How old is your son? In our small town the school district runs a child care program that's available to all no matter the income and it starts at pre-school age. Some people pay tuition, others can get help through the state if they qualify. But because it's through a public school program they have to accommodate the children's needs. My dd has attended the program since kindergarten. Some years before school, some after, a few summers. They don't have nurses but I've trained the staff and they could always call me as needed. As dd's now in 6th grade, she has a cell phone and does most of her own care, but they are trained if needed.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2012
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    As much as I hate to suggest a child adapting their medical management to accommodate others, have you considered seeing if medicaid would cover a pump? It would be cheaper, probably, than sending a visiting nurse to the location each and every day.

    And I think pumping is an easier way to deliver insulin than injections, but I know that that's subjective.:cwds:
     
  4. maciasfamily

    maciasfamily Approved members

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    I would love to get him on a pump, but the doctor said they wouldn't consider it until a year. I don't know why...we have our first appt with the Endo at the end of March so I'll ask more about it.

    My little guy is 2 and we don't have a state program for childcare. The daycare issue can also be a language difficulty. Their primary language is Spanish, but they read and understand English. I don't speak Spanish, so it can make it hard to explain certain things.

    I do think them calling me with his carbs and his read is a great idea. I will see if they would be willing to do this. That would make it easier.
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    The language barrier would concern me, because, as you say, explaining things in English, to someone who mainly speaks Spanish, over the phone could create confusion. If they are saying that they are concerned they would get confused on dosing, listen to them. Then think, is it worth it for you to be having to put up with this? There are many daycares out there that will accommodate you, it might be worth looking into. But, I would also look into seeing if a visiting nurse would come and dose your child, but those situations are usually for short term, not long term. But, it's worth asking.
     
  6. tbcarrick

    tbcarrick Approved members

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    At our endos,when we had our classes,we could bring other people with us,maybe your doc has someone that speaks spanish and then your daycare person could go to a class?just a suggestion..
    good luck
     

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