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Does hotter temp and or slight dehydration translate to high BG's???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Jul 3, 2014.

  1. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    This subject comes up every once in a while here and I am wondering what the current view is?

    Does water alone lower BG if it is suspected that someone maybe slightly dehydrated?

    Just curious?
     
  2. Lori_Gaines

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    I found that when the temperature went up in the spring, she ran lower. As for your water for dehydration/high BG, I have no idea. Curious to see!
     
  3. namegirl

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    Heat leads to lows for us.
     
  4. rgcainmd

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    If there are no other variables at play, water alone can lower BG, especially if someone is dehydrated. Water lowers osmotic concentration by decreasing the osmoles of solute (which includes glucose molecules) per liter of solution (in this case blood). When my daughter's BG is high in the middle of the night, I give her water in addition to insulin; insulin drives glucose molecules into her cells and water helps by essentially "diluting" her blood. Water increases the volume of fluid in which the remaining glucose molecules reside, thereby lowering the mg of glucose per deciliters of blood.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    How much water are we talking about?
     
  6. nebby3

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    In spring when it begins to warm up my dd begins to run low. However in more extreme heat she tends to run high. I've never tried relying on just water to bring her down though. I think there is more than just dehydration going on.
     
  7. shannong

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    I have found that water does lower my son's bg when he is dehydrated. On the other hand, it seems to have no effect if dehydration is not an issue. I see that especially at night when he wakes up very thirsty after a long day of playing where he probably did not drink enough. If he drinks water, I will see a noticeable drop in bg's.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    our school advocated for 20oz if BG over 300, but I have no idea if there is a basis for that qty to have that written in diabetes care plans.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Human bodies work better when hydrated so I'm sure being hydrated makes our job easier. I think it's nutty to think that water, even 20 oz would lower bg on it's own. And I think my kid would puke if I made her drink 20 oz of water at once with a high bg.
     
  10. sszyszkiewicz

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    We were taught to drink as much water per hour in ounces as the age of the child if we are high and had ketones. So 12 ozs of water per hour if the child is 12. We were told it would help reduce the glucose level because it would ultimately lead to more frequent trips to the bathroom.
     
  11. rgcainmd

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    I try to get her to drink at least 8 oz. (or whatever I can get into her because she's still mostly asleep) after I've given her an appropriate correction bolus. In reality, this probably has less impact on her BG and more impact on my feeling like I've done all I can. It goes without saying that if a child is truly dehydrated, rehydration via I.V. fluids may be indicated.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2014
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Never seen a post on CWD about a D kid needing IV fluids other than those already sick with a GI bug.
     
  13. rgcainmd

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    That's the kind of situation I was referring to; I should have said "severely" dehydrated instead of "truly" dehydrated.

    And I agree with you about trying to get your CWD to drink lots of water when their BG is soaring. My daughter is probably no exception when it comes to drinking large volumes of water when her BG is in the 300s. When she's that high, she's also feels nauseous; too much water or even "enough" water given too quickly will make her vomit.
     
  14. Adrian

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    The only thing I know for sure: cold body temperature lowers the bg level, als the cells produce glucose transporters without the need of insulin to get energy to raise the body temperature. I can experience that my bg drops much more when taking a bath in the Atlantic ocean as compared to the Mediterranean sea or a heated swimming pool.

    In summer I tend to be more physically active. I therefore need less insulin in summer. If it has anything to do with the weather apart from that, I doubt it. But I cannot be sure.

    As to drinking lowers blood glucose: The level at which the kidneys stop holding back all the glucose is different form person to person. Mine is about 150mg/dl but I have MODY III and therefore have a decreased level.
    I think the decrease of high bg values after drinking mainly comes from p**ing out the glucose.

    Adrian
     
  15. swellman

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    Water is not a treatment. Period. Water may alleviate symptoms but it doesn't treat ketones nor high BGs. The "dilution" suggestion is baseless. "Flushing" ketones is redonkulous. Water is a treatment for thirst. "Flushing" isn't a thing.
     

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