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Does BG stablize as an adult?

Discussion in 'Adults with Type 1' started by ashtensmom, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. ashtensmom

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    Hi everyone. I am usually on the Parent of children forum as I have a daughter with type 1 (dx'd 8 months ago). I realize, as a growing child, her BG will fluctuate wildly because of growing, and metabolism, etc (or at least this is what I hear). But, I was wondering if this swing in BG will stabilize as she gets older. Is there anyone that can answer this question? Someone here who has had T1D since early childhood and now an adult.... did your BG stabilize somewhat when you reached adulthood, or does it still go up and down alot? Is BG control more predictable as an adult, or do you still get the "WTH" BG readings when you do everything right?
     
  2. emm142

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    At 19, I get a lot of WTH. Stabilization would be awesome. :p
     
  3. ashtensmom

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    Hi Emm. Fancy seeing you here :D

    You are still a baby:p Yes, I hope stabilizing will be a reality after age of 25 or so??? I don't know a lot of t1 adults (actually I don't know any). However, I have "met" one or two, and have heard "stories" from people who has a friend, relative, etc. Their stories sounds like they have better control... anyway I am just wishful thinking... wanting a easier life for my DD when she's not living with me anymore. Hope university is going well.
     
  4. emm142

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    Fingers crossed! From what I hear of adult type 1s in the online community, it sounds like there are still a fair few WTH moments, but maybe still less than younger people get. I'm guessing it's quite hard to tell, even for one individual, whether it gets easier because of age or something else, since treatment methods have been changing so rapidly in recent years.
     
  5. ashtensmom

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    Sigh.... yes we have come a long ways... I am sure in your lifetime and our DD's that treatment and management will be different (for the better I hope). It doesn't take much to make it better. I would be happy with non-invasive CGMing and fool-proof smart insulin (if less than a cure was possible).
     
  6. sarahspins

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    Well....... yes and no.

    I think anyone that claims they are truly "stable" and doesn't need to change their basal rates or anything else is either NOT trying for the same level of control that most of us here strive for, or they are male and don't with the same types of hormonal fluctuations that us women are blessed with (which often feels like chasing a moving target).

    That said, I feel like I do a pretty good job of anticipating changes (due to hormones, activity changes, illness, etc) and making them before I run into really big problems.. so that part gets easier, but every once in a while I'm still thrown for a loop and end up in the "nothing works" pattern for a few days (either battling highs or lows). I think that's just part of living with D. I do hope that we'll have better tools to manage in the future.
     
  7. RomeoEcho

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    I agree with Sarah. I think most of the "stability" is an illusion, or differences of expectations. Most of the people on here have very high expectations and are willing to put the work in to try to achieve them. A lot of people accept wider fluctuations and therefore are "stable" in their opinion.

    At 27, I still have plenty of WTH moments, and have recently had a cycle of them. But I've also learned to accept them and also to get really good at dealing on the fly. (for the most part, I still sometimes get angry, especially when very high or low) I have seen improvements over time, but I think most of that is technology improving. I also think that to some degree it is easier to take care of your own diabetes than someone else's. It's easier to be in tune with your own body, and over time you do learn to anticipate things. Diabetes never follows "the rules" regardless of age, but time in general makes it easier to deal with. I lead a very successful life despite/with my diabetes.
     
  8. ashtensmom

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    Thanks Romeoecho.

    Yes, I believe it is easier to treat your own diabetes rather than a parent treating, as I can't feel what my DD is feeling. So, can you 'feel' what your BG is? Meaning do you feel 'off' each time you are high or low, so that your 'feeling' can prompt you to check BG, etc? I know our DD will tell us she feels low most times, but I am interested to know if you have 'different' feelings at each stage of BG, low, in range, or high. My DD sometimes will say I feel like I am in the 5's (100's), but she's too young to articulate how that feels. So, I want to ask if generally, a person with diabetes, can your body signal you whether you're in range or high/low so you are prompted to test?

    As a parent, I find it's tough on us because it is always on our minds whether she's high or low and the tough part is "we can't feel it" so we are constantly on the edge of our seat, stressed over not knowing and constantly just guessing and hoping she's in-range. But, as the individual, can you get in tune that much with your body that some of the "worry" is alleviated just because "you feel" the symptoms of high/lows?
     
  9. emm142

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    I think that for many people it's a lot more vague than that. I know for me that I rarely feel any different when I'm low. So between 20mg/dl and 180mg/dl I feel pretty much the same. I usually can tell when I'm over around 180, but I can't tell how much over it I am - I don't usually feel markedly worse at a 350 than I do at 200. So, as a matter of course, I either feel "high" or "fine". But I'm not always high when I feel high and I'm not always fine when I feel fine. This is why I wear a CGM. ;)

    These are the things I do think are easier about self-treatment:

    1) It seems that there is generally less guilt if you do something which doesn't work out for yourself than if you do it to your child. Parents seem to feel a different level of guilt if, for example, they sleep through an alarm overnight, than I do.

    2) I'm with myself at all times. I never need to train or rely on anyone else for my diabetes management, and there is rarely a period of time that I am unable to check BG for.

    3) I'm in total control of things like what I eat and when, and I don't have to worry about emotional aspects as much (for example, I weigh my food whenever I want to, whereas someone with a child might be worried about creating food issues etc.).
     
  10. ashtensmom

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    Thanks Emm,

    You know, I often thought what it would be like if "I" had diabetes. I have never thought of it as 'devasting', and thought it would be something I could handle. Albeit high management, but not that bad. And knowing and feeling this way, I also thought with enough diligence that I can ward off long-term complications by not sustaining highs for too, too long. Having said that, I hope my DD will have the same attitude about it when she is older, and not be depressed over it. That said, lows still scare the hell out of me!!!
     
  11. emm142

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    Of course, there are things which I think are probably harder in self-management than management of a child, like:

    1) Having to be rational enough to take action when it is you yourself experiencing horrible symptoms.

    2) Never, ever being able to even get a small break from doing all the work.

    But overall, yes, I don't find it devastating to have diabetes. It is a lot of work and it's really hard sometimes, but it hasn't ruined my life and I hope your daughter will feel that way, too.
     
  12. jilmarie

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    I wouldn't say that BG stabilizes, but for me there are definitely less changes in insulin doses. My ratios have been the same for 2 years. My basal rates have changed, but nothing very drastic. I do work a schedule which includes overnight call, and I require a pretty aggressive basal change on those nights.

    I feel most of my highs and lows. I reliably feel blood sugars below 55 and above 200. I eat the same meals over and over so there is less carb guessing.

    It seems like there are less variables in adulthood.
     
  13. Ali

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    You do not have growth hormones but all my other hormones caused major issues and that did not improve till several years post menopause. As an adult you have much more control over your exercise and eating. Plus as an adult the ability to not eat or to hurry up and eat is much easier to control than for a child. I still have continual basal changes related to sleep, stress, overall activity levels, residual hormonal activity, unknowns. I am still very sensitive to small changes in insulin dosing and still have somewhat regularly those days when you can not get your highs down or your lows up. I feel lows but much depends on how quickly it happens. I can get into the 50's pretty clueless, but once below 60 for a bit I know something is off. Highs just feel a bit off also. But you do need to pay attention and both highs and lows can sneak up on you and be real trouble when sleeping. I wear a CGMS and for many years before the CGMS I got up most nights to check my BG. Know the CGMS just alarms and I roll over and eat some candy. Still a disruption but less so than a BG check. My overnight numbers still flucuate too much to sleep straight through without a check unless I go to bed pretty high and am willing to wake up high. The constant of having to be aware of ones disease is tiring but it is what it is. I have a good life, children and marriage.:cwds: Ali
     
  14. RomeoEcho

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    I sometimes feel highs and lows. I also sometimes feel high or low when I am not. I think the bigger factor is that I know exactly what I am doing when I do it. I can't sneak food from myself or go run around and need someone to notice. I know when I am feeling stressed and that that means I need to pay attention to my BG because of that. All those factors are harder to account for when it's not your own body.

    That being said, there are some things that are easier when it's not your own body. There is nothing like the ravenous eating of a middle of the night desperate panicky low. You can tell your child that they've had enough to eat and need to wait for it to work. On your own, these lows can lead to over a hundred carbs in just minutes, and telling yourself to stop requires extreme willpower at a time when you don't really have it.
     
  15. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I'm 52, would love to see bg stable, don't think it'll happen!I still get WTH and WTF readings when I do everything right.

    It doesn't fluctuate wildly all the time though, although my hubby keps asking me why my # is this or that............
     
  16. Lisa P.

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    Oh, I think that should be on meters. Numerals, HI, LOW, and WTF. :D
     
  17. MamaBear

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    LOL how do you treat a WTF?
     
  18. emm142

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    Personally I put on a temp basal of 200% and recheck every 30 minutes until I see some change. ;)

    Of course, there is the rare WTF for which I have to rapidly ingest around 200g carbohydrates and recheck every 15 minutes until I see a difference. :p
     
  19. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I agree with Lisa, the meters whould have the comments, andfor the high WTF, I bolus and wait, for the lows a 0 basal, sometimes treat with a glucose tablet, or with juice. Sometimes I even have a treat I usually don't have (like hubby's chips :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  20. MamaBear

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    I think in that situation the meter should read "OCRAP!"
     

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