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Do you or your husband/wife have type 1?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by payam7777777, Oct 18, 2007.

?

Do you or your husband/wife have type 1?

  1. yes

    9 vote(s)
    14.3%
  2. no

    54 vote(s)
    85.7%
  1. Kirsten

    Kirsten Approved members

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    I think that it's good for people to know about the increased risk, but having a 5% chance of D is not a high risk in my opinion. Everyone here are obviously the unlucky ones or we wouldn't be here. It's a concern and something my child and his eventual partner should consider, but it is by no means a fact (or even a probability) that their children, grandchildren, or great grandchildren will be affected. It's not something that I spend a lot of time worrying about.

    Kirsten
     
  2. payam7777777

    payam7777777 Approved members

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    even though a 5 or 6 percent chance is 30 times the .2 percent chance of ordinary people?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  3. Riley'sMom

    Riley'sMom Approved members

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    i don't agree.

    i agree with alot of your posts payam but not this one.
    my daughter won't have children, not because of her D but because she has Down Syndrome and won't have the mental capacity to care for them. we'll be lucky if she can ever live on her own.
    if my other daughter had D, i would never think of telling her that she can't marry and can't have kids.
    there are several T1 adults on here with T1 kids and i am sure they can't imagine life without them.
    would you apply your theory to other medical conditions as well?
    i think we should focus on spreading awareness and finding a cure, not on trying to limit D in the population by saying who can and can not have children.
     
  4. payam7777777

    payam7777777 Approved members

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    i appreciate your answer to my post anyway.

    i didnt mean to literally tell them that they cant marry and have children, but...

    Mmm... yeah but you know...

    i think i would. it would be like saving unborn people from diseases. actually it's being done right now... take for example the fact that doctors say cusins should not marry.

    but wouldnt preventing birth of an otherwise diabetic be great? its like saving a human being [and their family] from diabetes.
     
  5. OSUMom

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    I hear what you're saying and understand where you're coming from :cwds:, but we raise our kids and then they are they're own people. We have no right to "ask them not to marry and have kids". Maybe you'll see this more as the child grows up more and see they do become more mature and adult like - capable of making they're own decision. I'm pretty shocked by your question here though I understand where your thought process is coming from.
     
  6. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

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    Then what did you mean? I'm just trying to understand. :cwds:
     
  7. payam7777777

    payam7777777 Approved members

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    the thought that this D stuff may happen to their kids scares the sh*t out of me.
     
  8. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    Few among us live a life without some kind of physical or mental challenge. To ask us all not to have children because our kids have a higher than baseline risk for developing something is exactly the sentiment that led to the most significant abuse of human rights that the world has ever seen (Germany, World War II). Once we begin on that path, who among us will decide what is acceptable and what is not?

    Scientists are working very hard every day to make living with type 1 diabetes easier. Will we ever see the day where there is a complete cure? I honestly don't know. Will we see the day when kids at high genetic risk can be prevented from developing type 1? That I believe we will see. Will we see the day when sensors and pumps and faster insulin make it much easier to keep glucose levels in range? That I know we will see.

    So I for one would never ask our kids with diabetes not to have kids.
     
  9. OSUMom

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    I understand. :cwds: We have a son who is 20 so we're much closer to that stage of life....

    It's less dramatic to look at the 4-6% statistic than the 30 times higher way of thinking, and there are all kinds of horrible diseases and conditions out there - we can't cleanse the population.

    My husband says there are all kinds of genetic malfunctions in each us, if we knew them all, none of us would ever have children. Bottom line is it's a personal choice for each couple.
     
  10. melaniej

    melaniej Approved members

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    my grandad had tye 2 thats it for my side and the kids dad was adoped
     
  11. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Thank you, Jeff. Well said.

    Our family -- my mom was diagnosed in 1967 at age 17.

    My son was diagnosed in 2001, at 9 months old.

    I was diagnosed in June, 2007 at age 30.

    The fact that my mom was diabetic and my children and myself were at high risk bore no weight on my decision to have children. When Carson was born, the only one in my family with D was my mom. You just can't predict the future. There was no way of knowing that we would both get D. And there is no way of knowing what else will happen in our lives, or anyone else's lives for that matter.
     
  12. ScottB

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    I watched a show on NOVA the other night about epigenomes and identical twins. Medical science is trying to explain how 1 twin can develop cancer and the other twin having the exact same dna does not. In another case how 1 twin has severe autism and the other again with the exact same dna does not. Or how both sides of a family has a long string of generations with healthy children but 1 generation gets nailed with autoimmune disorders. Science has a long way to go before they understand epigenomes but it could lead to better medicine.

    I'm not trying to make a joke of this but the 1 issue that does seriously bother our 16 year old is the possibility of him in the future having ED because of his D. He keeps seeing ads on TV for products like v#agra and how ED seems to be always mentioned in these ads. For a 16 year old male who's shall we say becoming of age, ED doesn't sound like fun.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2007
  13. wkat

    wkat Approved members

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    While I understand your concern, I think your child should be the one to make that decision later in life. As an adult, he or she will get the correct information and decide for themselves what is best for them. What message will you be sending to your child by telling them they should not bring children into this world like themselves? I don't think you want them to feel that it would be better had they not been born.

    T1 diabetes is not a death sentence. Amongst my friends w/ T1 who have had it 20-30+ years, there are scientists, lawyers, lobbyists, teachers, SAHMs, writers, consultants, etc. The problems that we discuss in this group are usually not even D related. Meaning, we all have full lives w/ many other issues other than D. These are all women in a group I'm part of for T1 moms. Out of the 30, none of them have children at this point w/ T1. My son is positive for antibodies but doesn't have T1 yet. So perhaps we will be that 3%. If the stats are correct and 3 out of 100 women will have kids w/ D, I don't get how you conclude that your child will probably have a child w/ D. Thank goodness I didn't have the information before my son was born that he would end up w/ D, b/c I probably would have made the decision not to have children. Instead, I have a bright, funny, articulate, curious 4 year old, who will make a positive contribution to this world no matter what. I am confident of this. Just as my parents were confident, or at least made me feel that I would have a good quality of life despite being dxed w/ T1 in 1974 when the stats were much more grim.

    People have different pov's about genetic selection. If you tried to wipe out all the people w/ a predisposition to cancer, depression, auto-immune disease, etc., we'd have a very small world. It's one thing to give people the info and let them make decisions, it's another thing to talk about mandating what people should do.
     
  14. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    My dad was moaning for months after I was diagnosed that his genes suck so much he should never have had children.
    I told him I'm not sorry I'm here, genetic disorders and all.
    I think that if I feel that having diabetes isn't something so bad that I think it's something I shouldn't have kids because of, my kids are likely to have the same attitude.
    I read A Matter of Dignity by Andrew Potok a few years back. He has retinitis pigmentosa (a condition that gradually causes blindness, starting between birth and young adulthood), and he knew that his kids would have a 50% chance of getting it. He had two kids, and oddly enough, one has RP. Talking about that decision, he says he knew it wasn't so bad living with RP, and his daughter, who has RP, is glad he made the decision he did.

    Granted, diabetes is not RP. But I would not feel guilty about bringing another diabetic into the world. Nump.
     

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