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Do you limit your child's carb intake?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by aslan1994, Aug 23, 2011.

  1. Fairlight

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    Well.....I guess you could say we limit carbs. When Ds was first dxed, we sat down with the dietician and she asked about Ds's eating habits, then made him out a meal plan showing us how many carbs he would get each meal. Right now, Ds's meal plan allows for 60 carbs for breakfast, lunch, and supper, and three 15 carb snacks daily. Now, he also has an insulin to carb ratio for when he eat more or less carbs. Pizza, birthday parties, etc. always mean he will be eating more carbs, but for the most part, we try to stick with the meal plan on normal days. We find he runs better numbers when we stick to the meal plan. The doctor said it would also help keep his weight stabilized in the long run.

    I would have been concerned that your Dd would have gotten low without eating her grapes. Were they included when you carbed for her insulin?
     
  2. frizzyrazzy

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    first, grapes are like water for us. But, no fruit is off limits. He can eat as much fresh fruit and veggies as he wants.

    Second, we did have an "overly helpful" teacher last year and while might have thought she was well intentioned, she was amazingly misinformed and hurtful to my son.
     
  3. joan

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    The thing I love the most about this forum is that it gives us (parents) confidence when we are constantly bombarded with other peoples ideas about what our children should eat.

    When my son was younger I would feel the same way as you, " maybe she (teacher with no knowledge of type 1) has a point. Maybe she knows more than me. Maybe I should not let my child eat grapes."

    But as you can see, hell no to the teacher. I would say thank you for being concerned but your comment has me concerned that you don't understand my daughters type 1 and maybe I can give you some literature to read or come in to discuss it it. Her attitude towards watching what your daughter is eating and then telling her not to have it is giving conflicting messages to your daughter as well as the wrong information. I wonder if she is telling the overweight children not to eat their whole lunch. If you can't tell from my post I hate this type of thing. Good luck .
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Couldn't agree more.

    Will this teacher decide, that when that first tray of birthday cupcakes arrives at school that your dd should have a bowl of cottage cheese instead? I say again, nip this in the bud. Interfering in what your dd eats is dreadful on two levels: 1. it is flat out dangerous with regard to insulin/carb balance and dosing but perhaps moreover 2. I think the very last thing a a young girl who has a disease that will color her relationship with food and who is at a far higher risk of developing unhealthy attitudes toward food and disordered eating,the last thing that child needs is to have an authority figure sorting and judging the foods mom/dad have packed for lunch.
     
  5. frizzyrazzy

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    It also makes it hard for your daughter to want to speak up for herself when someone in a position of authority is telling her something different.

    I'll be happy to share the letter I needed to send to school last year (dubbed, the Great Cupcake Debacle).
     
  6. swimmom

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    A couple of moms recently posted their "letters to the teacher" and one of those had an explanation of T1 vs. T2 and how T1's need carbs while T2's might have to limit carbs. It was really recent, so you can probably find it with a quick search. If I were you, I'd send the teacher a friendly email with that explanation and firmly insist that she keep her nose out of your child's lunchbox.
     
  7. aslan1994

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    Thanks

    Some of you were wondering if my dd was given insulin for the grapes, but then didn't eat them. No, the 52 carbs was exactly what she did consume. So no danger there, at least! :)
    Thank you for sharing what y'all do. It seems that most of you don't limit carbs- I just needed to know that I wasn't alone in my approach and doing this whole diabetes thing wrong!
    I like how one person said they limit "junk", not carbs. I also am becoming more aware of the GI - I need to learn more about that and implement eating the "good" carbs vs. "bad" carbs. Thanks again for your input - I'll talk with the teacher soon...
     
  8. aslan1994

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    "I'll be happy to share the letter I needed to send to school last year (dubbed, the Great Cupcake Debacle). "

    Michelle - I'd love to see this.

    PS - How do you get other posters quotes to be in that little blue box?
     
  9. tiger7lady

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    Oh boy, this would have infuriated me. It's one thing for them to think they can't have a treat because of diabetes but it's something completely different when a teacher decides the lunch YOU packed has too many carbs. That's completely absurd. Definitely don't wait on talking to her about this. Like others said I'm sure she is coming from a place of concern but she needs to be educated and know her boundaries. I mean, does she tell the overweight kids they can't eat a part of their lunch because they've had too many calories already?
     
  10. emm142

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    To answer the question in your title, I do limit my own carb intake slightly (for the majority of meals, I try to stay under 50g - but that's not to say that I never go over!). I think that's different, though, because I'm an adult making my own decisions. Even if you wanted to limit your child's carb intake, it's still wrong of the teacher to do so... It's not her job. I agree that you need to nip this in the bud.
     
  11. lgouldin

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    You click on the word quote at the bottom of their post:D
     
  12. momandwifeoftype1s

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    This is sad to me because I can relate. Connor had the opposite experience at school last year. His lunch was picked apart by 4 staff members because they thought I didn't pack enough carbs. I wrote up the details of the incident and had a meeting with the principal the next day. That never happened again.
     
  13. Beach bum

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    We actually have in our 504 this year the following:

    "staff members are not to question our child's food choices. The meal decision was made at home under the guidance of a parent. If a staff member is concerned with her dietary choices, they are to contact the parent, not to question the child."

    This is because it was mentioned to me that certain staff members sometimes "police" the kids with diabetes. My peeve here is that their privacy policy is being breached, and it's no ones business what my kids eat...except their parents.
     
  14. momandwifeoftype1s

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    And then their peers overhear the teacher being the food police. Since the teachers are often revered on a pedestal by their students, then all the kids within earshot (or who hear it through the grapevine) assume the teacher is right and think that your child is even more different. Which is the very thing that we work so hard to minimize for our CWD. Our child can eat the same foods as their peers. They can eat packed lunches. They can eat hot lunches. They can eat no lunches (as in my son's case with ADHD added to the mix). This should be a non-issue, and it makes me HOT :mad:.
     
  15. aslan1994

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    oh, duh:rolleyes: It had to be something that obvious that I just completely missed!:D Thanks for the help!
     
  16. frizzyrazzy

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    yep. Exactly. And this is something I tried to get across to Ian's teacher - that by announcing infront of the class that he couldn't eat something she perpetuated every bad misconception about diabetes AND made him feel like utter ****.
     
  17. fdlafon

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    we never limit carbs - EVER!

    I haven't read through the enire post yet, but I would tell that teacher that she has NO RIGHT to limit what your daughter eats and/or is provided in her lunch. That is NONE of her business!!! I would be pissed if someone did that to my child.
     
  18. saxmaniac

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    There are two issues here. Should a teacher be playing food police? No.

    Second, is any limit acceptable? I think it varies from child to child. I hate to break it everyone, but my son cannot eat unlimited carbs, especially grain/starches. He would gladly eat 300g of pizza or pasta given the opportunity, and given no limits, his BG would be sky-high 24/7. I'm not prepared to give him unlimited carbs in exchange for a 13 A1c.

    We think he has some issue where he can't feel fullness or something, as this kid can pack it away. I've tried to let him eat as much as possible for a single meal -- he can easily eat six hotdogs and be looking for more. He's a very slow/steady eater, so it's not stuffing his face before he can feel full. He won the "bottomless pit" award at Barton camp for eating 3 hot dogs. (We thought, "only three?")

    I would let him eat unlimited vegetables or fruit, which are technically carbs, but he simply doesn't want to.
     
  19. SarahKelly

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    I think this goes back to the fact that not only do we have to help our children maintain great A1C's for their health we also have to teach them healthy eating habits and unlimited carbs of one particular food isn't healthy for anybody. I don't think you're doing different than anybody here, Isaac's carb intake isn't limited, however he has to eat more than just noodles and cheese at every meal...so yes, fruit, veggies...etc are a part of that "limitless" carb intake.
    I think you bring up a good point though, there are foods that we limit or times of the day where he can eat those foods. Maybe that sounds strange, but anything with high fat and dairy (ice cream/yogurt) has to be consumed several house before bed or we'll be up all night battling highs...this is just where you have to figure out what works best for your child and what areas you feel are okay for a little give and take. Granted this is entirely different with a 3 year old who isn't being policed by a teacher, so take what I say with a grain of salt :)
     
  20. AmyMCGS

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    We don't limit carbs unless DD is high, in which case we try to choose lower-carb options.

    I know the teacher meant well, but if it was me, I'd let her know that I have carefully carb-counted the lunch, using the guidelines given by my child's endocrinology team. (Truthfully, I would probably be a bit mad, well-intentioned or not!) I'd probably also print out a short article on the differences in Type I and Type II to help educate her.
     

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