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Do you have any theories on weight loss after dealing with diabetes?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by rutgers1, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. rutgers1

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    I'm not looking to make any enemies here, but I think Wilf wasn't talking about specific individuals, but people in general.

    Yes, there are people who cannot exercise because of sickness or injury. Those people will obviously have a harder time keeping their weight in check. Likewise, I know of many people who can eat what they want and not exercise without gaining a pound (My wife is a twig and doesn't work at it at all). Yet, by the same token, I think we are talking about a minuscule number of people if we are talking about people who do all of the right things (eat well, exercise, and generally take care of their bodies) and are still significantly overweight.

    I have yet to meet someone who eats the recommended amount of calories (good calories, not junk food calories), exercises daily, and is obese. I have a friend who still has an extra 25 pounds that sits in the wrong spots despite generally doing the right things, but she isn't carrying around an extra 150.

    I tend to let an extra 25 pounds creep up on me from time to time in my adult life. It is completely my fault. When I stop exercising (or slow down with the exercising), and when I don't watch what I eat, the pounds pile on. While I have a trouble area (stomach) that doesn't seem to want to disappear no matter what I do, I still feel that the difference between looking "fit" and looking "fat" are up to me.

    My father was recently diagnosed with cancer. For years, he swore that he had no control over his weight --- he was just meant to be the weight he was at. He claimed he ate well. Yet when he HAD to lose weight for surgery, and when he HAD to follow a strict diet, he started losing a pound-per-day. Within a few weeks, he looked like a new man. When I looked at his changes, I realized that, what many of us THINK of as doing the right thing in regard to diet and exercise are simply just misconceptions -- or our minds fooling us into thinking we are powerless.

    Once again, some people get a pass (injured, sick) in my book, but I truly believe that the people who claim that their body was just meant to be heavy are usually just making excuses (I have definitely made those excuses in the past.). Yes, those people might have to work harder than others to lose that weight, but I truly think that in the vast majority of cases it can be done. While I don't think any amount of work will lead me to getting a job as a fitness model, I do feel that in many regards I control my own destiny when it comes to weight/fitness.
     
  2. emm142

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    I'm going to speak in Wilf's defense as well. ;) I don't think he meant that it was psychologically simple but that it is usually physiologically simple - you will lose weight if you ingest fewer calories than you burn.

    Psychologically, changing habits etc., is anything but simple.
     
  3. Deal

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    I've yet to hear of any case where someone gets sick and can't eat and starts gaining weight. We aren't all created equal but we all adhere to the laws of physics. Our mass is also stored energy. Expel energy and mass will be depleted.

    It does amaze me that Dr Oz can do a new show every week about the 'new' way to lose weight when there really is only one way. Consume less energy then you use. The additional energy that you use doesn't come from nothing. It is stored mass converted back into energy. All excuses, reasons, conditions, etc. still must adhere to basic laws of physics.
     
  4. ChristineJ

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    Absolutely! More and more, research is showing connections between weight gain/loss and genetics, medical\health issues, and gender, etc. Some people\families are thought to have "thrifty genes", which makes their bodies store more, and burn less, energy than someone without that genetic makeup, even with comparable energy intake and output. Some people have conditions such as PCOS and familial insulin resistance that affect their metabolism.

    Even for people without known metabolic conditions, physiologies differ! Some are made to be "long and lean, while others are made to be "short and round", with every possible option in between. Weight issues are NOT "really that simple". I understand nobody here meant to be, but I find it elitist and condescending when people say "it's so simple" or "people are just making excuses". Many people struggle unsuccessfully for years, even their whole life, to manage their weight, despite exercising and controlling their intake.

    As the saying goes "walk a mile in someone's shoes" before thinking you understand their struggles. As SarahM said, nobody WANTS to be fat!

    Christine
     
  5. Deal

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    I suggest that people that say they are struggling to lose weight are actually struggling to consume less calories then they burn. Nothing more, nothing less. Scientifically I don't think you can argue the point.

    I'm not suggesting different people don't have different physiological and psychological reasons for consuming more, or for burning less and therefore not losing weight but that is integrating the simple physics of weight loss with our complex human problems.

    I don't think that's an elitist or condescending point of view as I do recognize the difficult issues people have meeting that goal of consuming less then they expel.

    Technically marriage is simple too. Just stay together and get along. The devil is in the details but the technical aspect is simple.
     
  6. ChristineJ

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    The fact that the point of view you express acknowledges difficult issues are involved, makes it not the point of view to which I was referring. There are some people, and I've met some IRL, that hold the view that weight loss is simply take in less than the energy you expend. Period. End of story. It is that attitude to which I was referring.

    With regard to the "physics of weight loss", that may not be as technically simple as you suggest. Metabolic rate is not something that stays steady irrespective of other factors. Just as exercise can increase one's metabolic rate, decreased caloric intake can DECREASE metabolic rate. Finding the balance between that isn't necessarily a simple task.

    Christine
     
  7. Lee

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    As somebody who is overweight, I would love for it to be 'that simple'. I exercise - usually 5 days a week for an hour, with a trainer. If I eat what Weight Watcher's recommends I eat, or my nutritionist recommends I eat, or my doctor recommends I eat - calorie wise - I actually put on weight. If I eat over 1900 calories a day, I put on weight. If I eat 1500 calories a day, I maintain being fat.

    For someone to tell me that it is as easy as calories in versus calories out - you have not walked in a fat person's shoes.
     
  8. emm142

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    I really think that everyone is missing the point of Wilf's comment, which implied to me that weight loss is physically/chemically simple, and NOT that it is easy. For example, if 1500 calories per day means that you maintain your weight, then what that actually means is that you burn 1500 calories per day in your current lifestyle. If you ate 1300 per day, then you would lose weight. The equation is simple. Actually doing it is far from simple.
     
  9. andeefig

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    There are also those who do not exercise properly that may fall I to the "no matter what I do I can't lose weight" category. Just walking on a treadmill isn't going to cut it if your looking to lose major lbs. although something is better than nothing! People can have a skewed rate of perceived exertion...how hard they are *really* working. Also, cardio alone does not make a body fit. Strength training is hugely important and many women especially, don't do it or don't do it properly.

    There is also the body composition to consider. Body fat % is key. Someone can be a size 4 but have a higher body fat % than someone who is a size 10. This is referred to as being "skinny fat". So, size doesn't always matter in this case ;)
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Cause just plain "fat" wasn't bad enough, now you can be "skinny fat" :rolleyes:
     
  11. rutgers1

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    I would guess that the percentage of overweight people who fit your profile is probably very, very small. I know a lot of overweight people and none of them exercise or restrict their diet to the degree that you are stating. If everyone exercised 5 days a week with a trainer and ate a good diet, the overweight people we see on the street would be few and far between.

    But to get back to the original point of this thread, I think we can learn a lot from a diabetic about how different types of exercise (and lengths of exercise) affect our blood sugar. It is clear from watching my son and monitoring his blood sugar that not all exercise is created equal. This little inside look at how his body handles carbs has been fascinating.
     
  12. andeefig

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    No kidding, eh?? But this is really more important when looking at the health aspects of weight vs. just wanting to look like a hottie patottie lol
     
  13. emm142

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    I've got a good analogy here!

    Weight loss is simple - ingest fewer calories than you burn.

    Blood sugar control is simple - give yourself the right amount of insulin to deal with glycogenolysis and food eaten. ;)
     
  14. rutgers1

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    I totally agree with this. When I first started running, I remember thinking that I was going to die when I reached the corner of my block. To me, reaching that corner was the equivalent of scaling Mt. Everest. I actually checked the scale the next morning half expecting to see a pound or two erased from it. Once I got going, I was still only running 3 miles a few times a week, yet in my mind I was an exercising guru.

    I have some friends who think that walking is rigorous exercise, while I have other friends who do Crossfit -- which is at the other extreme end of exertion. You really can't compare the two.
     
  15. Deal

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    Bingo, nice analogy. Piece of cake!
     
  16. Flutterby

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    I have something called PCOS. I have to work MUCH harder to lose weight than someone my size (height/weight) without PCOS would have.

    For those that are taking insulin, your muscles need the carbs for fuel, the more exercise, the more fuel, the less insulin. We see this especially during the summer when she's swimming a lot. We'll see lows up to the next 24hrs after a day of swimming. To avoid constant lows we do a lot of free snacks.
     
  17. wilf

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    Well put. :)

    And I apologize folks, the bloody internet is not the best medium sometimes. I was meaning from a physiology perspective, what's needed to lose weight is simple - eat better and/or less, exercise more.

    I recognize that it can be very difficult to do something simple, as Emma so nicely points out. :cwds:
     
  18. ChristineJ

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    You're right, the internet isn't always the best medium for clear communication that conveys atttitude and intent. :cwds:

    What some of us are trying to say is that weight loss is NOT simple from a PHYSIOLOGICAL perspective. There are other PHYSIOLOGICAL factors being left out of that "simple" equation, such as genetics, hormone levels, metabolic conditions, etc. As Lee and Flutterby can attest, eating less\better and exercising more are not all there is to it from a physiological perspective. Metabolic rates are not static. Hormone levels, metabolic issues, etc modulate the body's response to altered intake and exercise, making the path to weight loss full of bumps and turns rather than a simple straight line.

    This analogy actually illustrates my point exactly. Anyone who has read the forum has seen over and over that blood sugar control is not simple. People post all the time about highs, lows, and other unexpected physiological results that occur even when they follow the "simple" equation and give what should be the right amount of insulin . Just as Your Diabetes May Vary, so too can Your Weight Loss Vary.

    I have PCOS as well, and I absolutely agree. I have to work much harder to lose weight than someone without. It's not just simply decreasing caloric intake and increasing exercise. It is absolutely much more physiologically complex than that. People with PCOS and other metabolic conditions are much more common than some people realize.

    Christine
     
  19. Michelle'sMom

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  20. ChristineJ

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