- advertisement -

Do you give protein after a low to maintain bs levels?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Momto3, Sep 29, 2011.

  1. Momto3

    Momto3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    177
    Our daughter had a low today after lunch. The school nurse called to tell me about it and then mentioned that once her blood sugar is back within range we should be giving her protein to keep her blood sugar levels up.

    I thought I had read to give a few crackers to maintain blood sugar levels. I read this shortly after DDs DX so I may be mistaken.

    Do you give protein or crackers after BS is back up from a low? Or do you do nothing at all?
     
  2. RacerWife7

    RacerWife7 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    We don't do anything once it's back up again. But, often, one of the things we use to bring it up is drinkable yogurt - and, obviously, that has protein. ;)
     
  3. swimmom

    swimmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2007
    Messages:
    647
    No we don't. Sometimes we use milk or chocolate milk (which has protein and fat), but we don't give protein if we use juice or tabs.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Protein doesn't keep BG up. Carbs keep BG up. Protein just slows the absorption of the carbs.
     
  5. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    It depends on the time and #. If its at night and low, we give juice and peanut butter crackers for the protein and the fat which will keep it from absorbing quickly
     
  6. L101418

    L101418 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    256
    When we were on MDI using Lantus, and mealtime was a few hrs off or at night, we would treat low with juice or such and then follow-up with crackers and PB sometimes. But now on the pump we do not follow-up with anything additional uncovered.
     
  7. anna-bananna

    anna-bananna Approved members

    Joined:
    May 23, 2011
    Messages:
    127
    Yes, we do. We sometimes give a combo (protein/carb) snack, if we have it available, but that sometimes spikes her really high, and then she stays too high. So sometimes we just give protien. We are still experimenting with this..kinda depends on how far away a meal is, I think.

    BUT if we don't follow with some protein after a low...she will be up for a bit and then fall right back down into low, after low, after low. So, for us, the protein DOES keep her bg up. This is what they told us at dx and it has proven true for us...BUT, as everyone here probably knows already...All together now..."YDMV!" :D

    ETA: Perhaps it keeps it stable, rather than up? Because it doesn't raise it...it just keeps it from falling.

    Also, I went back and looked at your signature...looks like you've been dealing with D for almost a year, now? I personally think if you needed to do this (protein after a low), you would've figured it out through trial and error, by now. So, if what you have been doing has been working this long and you are not seeing multiple lows without the protein...you probably don't need to worry about it. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2011
  8. Momto3

    Momto3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Messages:
    177

    Thanks so much for the vote of confidence! I needed to hear that because after talking to the nurse today I felt a little inept. Her heart is in the right place and she does a great job taking care of DD but sometimes her presentation isn't great.

    I'm glad to see others are treating lows similarly to how we've been doing it at home. Now that DD is on the pump we haven't had many (if any) lows that are hard to treat. We also don't have big spikes afterward, usually.;) But, if something can help DD I'm willing to try.

    I think I'll use the protein idea only if we start encountering some issues. it's crazy how easy it is to second-guess yourself when it comes to D treatment (at least for me). I've learned a lot this past year and realize there's still a lot more!

    Thanks for your reply!
     
  9. danielsmom

    danielsmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2011
    Messages:
    798
    We are doing protein snacks..Daniel needs it in the am. Twice when he's missed it he's gone low...5 hours between meals is apparently too long without food for him...I found at the dollar tree packaged pbj/cheese crackers packed in 4..exactly 15 carbs woohoo..lol...or he does a yogurt tube...I've noticed these last two days that with yogurt his numbers are lower at lunch 80-90....with crackers his numbers are 130-150..Since its happened before lunch he just gets fed and moves on...at school twice when he's had a low due to not enough food or over correction(happened twice)..he did not get a snack to follow...but it was right before school was out, so he did his snack at home...or at home when he's happened I follow up with glass of milk...or a snack if he has to wait a while before meals..
     
  10. lisac

    lisac Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    When Hadlee was on MDI we were trained to treat any low with 15g fast acting carbs(some sort of sugar), wait 15 min., retest bg, follow up with complex carb and protein(crackers and peanut butter or something of the sort). I'm pretty sure the thinking behind this is that if it was her long-acting insulin causing the low, it would continue to drop. We were rarely able to do all of that:eek:. When she started on the pump, I asked if we still had to do this and we were told "no". 5-15g carbs then recheck in 15 min. and that would be plenty, if we wanted to give her a snack after a low, we needed to make sure and give insulin with it.
     
  11. MamaBear

    MamaBear Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,906
    I used to do that, and the result was sky high BGs a bit later. Now I treat the low, and leave it at that.
     
  12. mommabear

    mommabear Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2011
    Messages:
    469
    We do not use protein to bring b.g. up. Somethings that we use of course have protien in it though. once the b.g. is up we don't do anything..We use tabs, juice and gogurt, to get it up..Just want to say that i have gave my son peanut butter before when he had a low and it took so long for the low to come up that I ended up over treating him..I found out later it was because of the peanut butter, because it slows the absorption down..
     
  13. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    Since you asked, we do because we were taught to treat the low w/ juice followed by 15g of carb. I just pick something that I know has either some protein or fat to delay absorption of carbs. That said, I've been wondering about this practice in relation to onset and the day when my daughter isn't in her honeymoon anymore.

    I get that in a non D person fasting acting sugar like juice, glucose, candy etc. raise blood glucose fast, and also drop off fast. So, when they told us that we needed to follow treating a low (fasting acting carb) with a snack, it made sense. She's got lantus for a basal, she's in her honeymoon w/ some islet cells still making noise, all that. But what about when she's not in a honeymoon? My science / health background makes me wonder if her basal will really be enough to drop those fast acting carbs all that much, and if some day following with 15g of carb, or fat / protein to hold it will still be necessary. I'd guess not to the same extent.

    We've already noticed that sometimes, depending on time of day or how low she drops, 15g is too much and 7 to 10 might do the trick. If she's 69 and does a glucose tab, she definitely doesn't need more than about 5g of carb to hold her, and I'm sure that will change. We love using sunflower seeds to follow a low since they're nutrient dense, not too high in carb, and provide both fat and protein. At this point, Niko can accurately eyeball a serving ;)

    The thing that bugs me about what was said to you is that no two patients are EVER alike. Your experience with diabetes and how it affects your kiddo isn't going to measure up to anyone else's - not exactly, and no health or school official should come off like that. Asking, does your child benefit from a snack following treatment for a low is a whole lot different from You Should....

    I have a small, cute little penguin sticker I made and want to put on Niko's health folders for school that says "Please don't SHOULD on this child or her family. They live with this condition 24/7, and greatly appreciate your help and concern TODAY." If we get one more should this year, they're going on the folders!! Sorry you got that today, but don't let them make you question yourself - you know your child better than anyone.
     
  14. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    See, that's really not accurate. The only reason to follow up fast-acting sugar with more carbs is if you think that the person is still dropping. A carb is a carb is a carb. So carbs with protein do not "hold" BG any better than pure glucose does. It just spreads the absorption of the carbs out over a period of time. The net result is the same.
     
  15. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    I wouldn't say inaccurate, but chalk our different understandings or ways of talking about this up to semantics. Any fast acting carb is such because there isn't anything else (fiber, protein, fat, etc.) to delay absorption of the carbohydrate. We were taught to follow with a snack b/c the fast acting does pull her up, but she (background insulin ?) will continue to drop, so we follow with a snack that is carb+ (protein, fat, whatever) to delay carb absorption, which essentially equates to holding her blood glucose levels stable. Same cats, different skin. Since most carbs outside of juice, glucose, and some candies fall in this boat, I can see where you're coming from, and why people might say it doesn't matter, That said, there are times for us when protein or fat makes all the difference, but fiber doesn't do diddly in terms of slowed carb absorption. Swimming comes to mind - even with skipped meal insulin, if she doesn't consume protein or fat with her carb, she'll drop low in the middle of a race.

    My thought is, and this is just wondering at this point, that as she come out of her honeymoon, she will have (essentially) less background insulin. Even though we'll compensate w/ more lantus, it won't biologically work exactly the same, so she either might not need to follow treating a low with a snack, or with less of one. Right now, if we don't follow the recheck with a snack, she just bottoms out again. We've met a number of T1Ds who used to treat then snack, but don't 'need' to anymore. I figure there must be a reason, which would support the OP and her experience that her child's never needed to do so, while others here have.
     
  16. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    But that's because she didn't have enough carbs. Not because she didn't have protein with carbs.
     
  17. Jazziesmom

    Jazziesmom Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2011
    Messages:
    44
    If it's night, I always give J a protein after the fast acting as the fast rise leads to an equally fast drop. We go to a top NYC hospital and this is what they tell their patients.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Well, yes, if something is still pulling them down, you'll get a fast rise followed by a fast drop with quick carbs, but you'll get the same net effect with slow carbs. Put another way, you end up in the same place either way.

    Here's a post I made on this previously. The end result is the same, whether you use fast or slow carbs to follow up the low treatment.

    Additionally, you only get a further drop if there's still something pulling BG down. Since there's no way to know that most of the time, I prefer to keep testing and retreating if necessary. Otherwise you can end up with a killer high.
     
  19. KatieSue

    KatieSue Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2010
    Messages:
    921
    We were also taught in the hospital to do 15g fast acting (like juice) then to follow up with something with more fat/protein, we use chewy granola bars, if needed.

    She rarely has the bad stubborn lows that she would sometimes have right after diagnoses so we don't need to to this much anymore. We've actually noticed now that the 15g of carbs is sometimes too much so if she's not that low we'll just treat with a half a juice box or one or two glucose tabs. We also started re-testing later than 15 mins unless she was really really low to start with. We'll now do it 20-30 minutes which seems to give us a better picture and we're not over correcting as much.
     
  20. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Yeah, it's the basic advice that most doctors give to people at diagnosis. Basically they're more worried about lows than highs at that point, and this is the "safest" advice for them to give. Over time, most people (like you) realize that this is overkill in a lot of situations, and adapt accordingly. :)
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice