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Do pumps hurt?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Hudson_Rocks, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. Hudson_Rocks

    Hudson_Rocks Approved members

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    I don't know much about pumps, but have been reading about them if the day comes that we go that route. What I'm wondering is, do they hurt to use? I don't know all the proper terminology. What I'm getting at is does it hurt to put the delivery system in place? I've watched videos of insertions, and I gather that they are quick, but not much beyond that.
     
  2. 3kidlets

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    Our only experience is with OmniPod. For the most part, Hana says it doesn't hurt at all or if it does, it is kind of like getting snapped quickly with a rubber band. But it seems like she only gets that occasionally in certain spots and not with others (maybe the more fat on the spot we are using, the better?). However, it is over immediately- a quick snap and it's done. We change the POD every 3 days. That is compared to the 8+ injections she was getting daily before the pump - so I"m sure it is worth it.
    But if you ask her, she will say that no, pumping doesn't hurt.
    Like I said, we've only used the POD. From what I understand, there is more involved to inserting a sight for a tubed pump, so others may have a different experience.
     
  3. JeremysDad

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    I cannot talk from experience but I CAN tell you that my son can barely feel the cannula being inserted when he changes his infusion site.

    So, does not hurt? No it does not.

    And if you decide to start using an insulin pump, you'll love it and will not look back, no matter what type you use.
     
  4. mommabear

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    They have a cream called elm cream that numbs the area..With that sometimes my son says it hurts sometimes not..he said it feels like a bee sting..It is never enough to slow him down..He will get his site changed and run out the door. I have done it to myself with the cream and it is not that bad..best of luck to you:)
     
  5. Kazee6

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    Lucas just recently got his first pump and he tells me all the time that it's much better than being stuck several times a day. When Wyatt first received his, our endo required his Dad and I to wear it for three days each with saline in it, the insertion process was easy and not painful at all. I'd rather have it than my fingers pricked. The boys never complain about it being painful.
     
  6. Hudson_Rocks

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    Thanks for the answers :) I am especially intrigued by the Pod, so really like hearing about that.
     
  7. MissEmi

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    If they hurt for longer than a minute or so, I usually take that as an indicator that it's a bad site, and 95% of the time, it is. It usually isn't very painful, and when it IS, it's usually only for a minute-ish.
     
  8. miss_behave

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    IMO pump insertions don't hurt much more than an injection. I prefer doing insertions manually, as opposed to the spring-loaded devices, and just slip the needle in like an injection (then remove the needle and leave the cannula in). You can always get a numbing creme like Emla if pain is a concern. I took a photo to show you a comparison between pump site needles and a syringe.

    [​IMG]

    On the left is the MiniMed Quickset infusion set (you remove the needle and leave a cannula in place) The needle looks thicker than it is, the light hit it badly :eek:
    In the middle is a normal insulin syringe, obviously
    On the right is the Rapid-D needle set. The needle stays in place (its good for people who have problems with cannulas kinking). As you can see, its tiny.

    Not so scary eh? 1 site change/3 days really beats 6 or so injections a day :cwds:
     
  9. StillMamamia

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    The infusion set (which has either a plastic or metal "needle") may hurt but you can always use a numbing cream to help out with that. Some kids have a higher threshold pain, others a lower (my son falls on the latter scale:rolleyes:).

    There are different lenghts for the "needle" and also for the tubing, which is connected to the actual pump).

    There are also different infusion sets for the different pumps.

    Taking out an old "site" is again dependent on how a kid reacts. Mine hates it, but sometimes he doesn't feel it at all.

    On average you leave an infusion set in for 3 days. Some people do better on less, some on more.

    The pump (the tubed ones anyway) can be clipped onto the pants or worn on something like a pump pouch or just stuck in the pockets (though we've found sometimes the tubing at the top of the reservoir breaks when my son has worn his in the pocket). It's a question of habit and preference.

    Giving insulin through a pump does not hurt usually, but sometimes, if the insulin is too cold, it may be felt going through.
     
  10. JeremysDad

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    I think the "hurt" is more psychological then physical. Doing a site change using the Omnipod does not hurt (according to my son), the Dexcom 7+ CGMS has an insertion device that looks a lot worse then it actually is. Jeremy had to pluck up the courage to do a sensor insertion last night. I eventually did it for him. He knows there is a long needle in the device but in actual fact, only a small part penetrates the skin and the actual discomfort is very minimal. Also, the insertion is over before you know it.

    Once you get past the "perception" that it may hurt, you realize that it probably doesn't or if it does, it is very minimal.

    If you are interested in the Omnipod as your choice of insulin pumps, you will find a ton of info, both positive and negative on this site, (mostly positive). Feel free to ask us questions.
     
  11. DsMom

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    I know that when we first started with the pump, we used a straight infusion set, and it didn't hurt Daniel at all. Then we switched to the slanted set (because Daniel has very little body fat, and the slanted works better in these cases), and he screamed. However, we quickly started using the lidocaine numbing cream, and he usually doesn't feel anything now. We've had a few emergency site changes when we don't have time to let the numbing cream soak in, and Daniel kind of flinches, but doesn't yell. To be honest, maybe one time out of twenty we will hit a "bad spot" that will hurt. And, on only one occasion, the site continued to hurt after insertion, so I needed to do a new one.

    The pump has been such an overwhelmingly positive thing for Daniel (and for me!), the rare times a site change hurts is just a small blip in the day.
     
  12. virgo39

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    My daughter uses the Omnipod system. She and I have described insertion as feeling like a rubber band snap. There are times when insertion hurts more than usual -- but she says it generally stops hurting within 1-2 minutes.
     
  13. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Infusion sets hurt way less then an injection and it's 1 every 2-3 days versus 5-8 a day!
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  14. zoomom456

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    The site I tried on myself did not really hurt, just a quick sting like a rubber band snap. My almost 3 year old son ALWAYS chooses his pump over shots when we ask about preference.
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

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    We use numbing creme, and my very needle-phobic son has no problem at all with site insertion. If we tried to give him a shot, he'd pitch a holy fit.
     
  16. DsMom

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    Just noticed in your signature that it says your son has Type 1 and Type 2. Don't mean to derail your thread--but I didn't think this was possible.:confused: Would you mind if I ask for more info on this?
     
  17. Hudson_Rocks

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    Thank you for the photo, miss_behave!
     
  18. Hudson_Rocks

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    Ask away -- I will answer as best I can :)
     
  19. DsMom

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    Was just wondering how it is possible.:confused: Type 1 is when the pancreas eventually stops creating insulin. Type 2 is the body not using insulin properly. If he has Type 1, he does not (or will not, eventually, after his honeymoon period) have any insulin for the body to not use properly--negating the chance for him to have Type 2. I phrased that oddly, I know--hope it makes sense. Will he just have Type 2 until his honeymoon phase is over--and then be only Type 1?? Just never heard of this happening before.
     
  20. Hudson_Rocks

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    Well, his lab work in December showed what the new endo said was a "high level" of insulin. He was for quite awhile overweight (he has lost 35# since July due to diet & exercise; it hasn't been rapid).

    His December blood work showed islet cell antibodies 1:4; the GAD it says is normal. I know there is one other thing but I can't remember what it is. Now the endo said that he tested positive for 2 antibodies....but the paperwork she faxed to me only shows the islet cell measurement.

    For a variety of reasons, we were not happy with the first endo, so we went to a new one, and saw him for the first time this month. He is the one who believes it to be both 1 & 2.

    It's a mystery at the moment :confused:
     

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