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Diabetes type 1 origin of too much pathogen-free environment ?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ecure, Jul 28, 2012.

  1. ecure

    ecure Approved members

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    Hi

    Interesting researcher about autoimmune origin in pathogen-free environment.

    Research interests :
    Autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 diabetes are increasing in incidence in the developed world faster than can be acounted for by genetic change. Onset of Type 1 diabetes and most other autoimmune diseases is governed by both genetic and environmental factors. Our study of environmental factors has highlighted a key role for infection in reducing the incidence of Type 1 diabetes. We find that protection from diabetes arises through an interaction between the infectious agent and the innate immune system such that circuits which regulate the autoimmune response are reinforced.

    Anne Cooke
     
  2. swellman

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    Don't forget to add dirt to your other list.
     
  3. Lisa P.

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    I don't find the theory that we need to be exposed to more pathogens to be credible -- if you compare the pathogen exposure of, say, homesteaders who didn't see people for months at a time to modern kids who are exposed to whatever pathogens their church, school, and parents' respective coworkers have every day, it doesn't fly to me. I don't see a correlation, and the hygiene hypothesis variations can be a great way to tell moms who don't like their kids coming home sick from school or daycare every day to stop complaining/worrying because it's actually good for them. :p So any "scientific" theory that heavily favors an industry gets my skepticism.

    What I do find credible is the human biome theory, that I've mentioned here a couple times. For example (and I'm fudging the numbers because I don't remember them), the rest of the world and Americans in the past have had H. pylori in their gut at the rate of about 80%, now in modern Americans it's down to about 20%. If you look at how symbiotic bacteria operate in the human body, it's amazing. They are actually responsible for some functions in many of the regulatory processes, including digestive processes and interactions with insulin. I think heavy, generational antibiotic use along with chlorinated water sources, antibacterial everything, ammonia-washed meat in the stores, "dead" food sources, and reduction for several generations in breastfeeding might mean folks do not have the bacterial mix previous generations did (you don't have the bacteria at birth, generally, you acquire it). I can see this being a factor in many autoimmune diseases and other modern maladies, it's the history of disease that taking down one "enemy" tends to make a space for the rise of a new one. Seems to me that our efforts to take down bacterial and viral infection would naturally come at a cost. Not saying it's a cost we shouldn't be willing to pay, I'm not sure whether folks in other parts of the world wouldn't trade a decrease in cholera, tetanus, typhoid, whatever for an increase in autoimmune disease.
     
  4. swellman

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    I honestly do not understand the premise that reducing viral infections would "naturally come at a cost". I truly don't.

    As for any "science" that heavily favors an industry, probiotics is one where the hype greatly surpasses the evidence and your skepticism should tingle for sure.
     
  5. Christopher

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    Some people may find you more credible if you post actual research instead of cutting and pasting a blurb from some professors Directory webpage. Just some helpful advice.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2012
  6. StillMamamia

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    I personally think that in the "developed world" we are just diagnosing some diseases earlier on, and that distorts the "increase" theory. In some parts of the world, access to medical care is poor and knowledge about symptoms probably not as well spread, and people die before we know what they had.

    I don't buy the whole dirt is bad/dirt is good theory. Sure, polutants are not human kind's (or the Earth's) BFF, but I am inclined to think we just have a whole bunch of wacky genetic mutations which surface more at some periods than at others, but we just don't know which and when.
     
  7. Lisa P.

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  8. swellman

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    This appears to be the full article.

     
  9. Lisa P.

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    Afraid both links bring me to an abridged version, sorry for the poor sourcing, I read the paper copy and didn't realize it was not available in full.

    Thanks for the cut and paste, I didn't personally find the diabetes stuff as probable as other points, but it was all interesting to me. Still think this won't wind up being "it", but it definitely fits with the geography piece of the puzzle.
     
  10. swellman

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    That's odd ... the PDF I posted shows 7 pages.
     
  11. Lisa P.

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    Different this time, maybe I clicked on my own link twice before? Can't read PDFs on my cheap, second hand but it tried to bring me off the browser so that must be it.
     

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