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Dexcom/overly worried Kindergarden teachers

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Susanne, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. Susanne

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    Sophia started Kindergarden this Fall. We chose a private (catholic) school because she did Pre-Kindergarden there (her teacher, a Type 1 diabetic, did all diabetes related care) and they had a full-time nurse (vs. a 2-day, not-very-much on-the ball nurse in her brother's wonderful public school).

    One week into this, I have a teacher and teacher's aid tortally panicing over every little thing. I gave them the Dexcom as a tool to feel calmer about lows. Somehow that back-fired. Today, they sent Sophia to the nurse twice before snack (between 8 and 10) because of high BG's on the Dexcom (it read 367, she really was 324) - clearly a breakfast/or "excited to be in a new classroom setting" spike. I told the teachers not to worry about post-meal spikes but to only focus on lows in the classroom. The nurse checks her at 10, at 12 and 2:30 and therefore could correct/ catch any highs that could cause a problem.

    Should I keep the Dexcom home? How do you instruct Kindergarden teachers to deal with highs? Our nurse is great but does not seem to communicate with the teachers much. Any advice how I could ease their anxiety?
     
  2. Flutterby

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    We use the sensor at the school.. school loves it, hates not having it, but they know not to worry about certain things.. it took some time for them not to freak out over every alarm..

    You could do a few things.. the first would be to leave Dex home. But if you really want to use the cmgs I suggest shutting of the high alarm (if you can), or setting it really high so it most likely won't go off, leaving them the low alarm... or you could leave it how it is and keep explaining that she's going to spike after a meal, there for just clear the alarm and don't worry about it.
     
  3. Lisa P.

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    These 300s were right before snack time? Maybe that was the concern, Selah is no stranger to 300s but I'd be inclined not to feed her a bowl full of goldfish or a package of fruit snacks if she were 350 and maybe still going up.

    I'd give instruction on that specifically, whatever your comfort level is, and give them some time to get a feel for it all. It took me a while to get used to the CGMS, I suspect your teacher and assistant will get a better feel for it when they've watched it for awhile.
     
  4. azdrews

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    I hear you - I have a love/hate relationship with our Dexcom, and I was worried about it being more a of a "problem" than a comfort at school. My son is in kindergarten too. :)

    Some may not agree with me, but I turned off all alarms on the Dexcom, except for the low (obviously!) That way it is not alarming and interrupting class...and really, if he is high, it's because he just ate breakfast or was just bolused. Plus, at school, we bolus after he eats lunch, so he will tend to spike up a bit.

    When he alarms low, they know to take action quickly and that has worked well. I have to say, though, that for the last week he has not worn Dex, and all has been fine. He is checked often enough at school, and his teachers are very aware of his "low" signs, so they have been on top of every low so far.

    I think it will become easier for them as the year goes on. How long has she been in school for? We have been in school for 6 weeks already, and Adam's teacher just told me that she is much more comfortable with it all now that some time has passed. Maybe just give them a chance to settle in and they won't be so panicky?
     
  5. tom_ethansdad

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    We don't use CGM, but we experienced similar when E started pre-school and again this year when he started K. The first few days they were getting overly concerned about every little thing, anytime he was a little high or a little low, or just acting a little different (not sure how you determine a child that you've only known for a few days is acting a little different, what's normal?). This is all new to them. But in both instances they quickly started to learn that not every high is an emergency, nor is every low. They are now starting to adopt our attitude. There are no good nor bad BG readings, there are simply BG readings that require correction and BG readings that don't require correction. They are comfortable handling both types now.
     
  6. selketine

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    This is exactly what we did with our cgms - only the low alarms are on. He was routinely tested enough to catch any problematic highs not due to breakfast spike, etc.

    A high takes hours to cause a problem - a low is your real worry.
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    We're another one who turned off all high alarms at school. The only CGM alarms we have on there are "low" and "predicted low."

    The high alarms were just too disruptive.
     
  8. ecs1516

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    What I did at first was put it on vibrate(or no alarm for a high) and not beep until things work out. Also set the levels to be higher for a high. Maybe 250. The teacher or aide can check when needed or just use it as a double check at the regular BG check time. It will take time to settle but even then if you are like us we will have lows and highs sometimes. They just need to get out of panic mode. Sometimes all this information at first freaks people out. But, I will say nice tool to have.

    Also set your high alarm to not go off again for two hours in the setup menu.

    Even with the high alarms off, I would send it to school because everyday you can review what happened and help make changes. This helps me get them more stable faster when starting back to school by reviewing the data everyday after school at first until things getting more stable.
     
  9. thebestnest5

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    That's what L did last year, or she set her high range so high that it'd only catch extreme highs.
     
  10. Susanne

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    The high was actually one hour before snack-1 1/2 hours after breakfast. We had above 250/300 highs all week in school 2-3 hours post breakfast. Even with our "keep BGs level stable proven Greek yoghurt" breakfast. It is the first week in her new school, so I believe we are dealing with adrenaline highs.
    I guess I just have to be more patient with the teachers. Thank you all for your input!
     
  11. Lisa P.

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    We just had the grand return of the breakfast spike ourselves this past week. :( Today was o.k., thankfully. . . . we used to be over 300 every morning, hate to return to that!

    Hope all goes great with your year! I'm sure you've got it covered!
     
  12. NomadIvy

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    Had to smile at this thread.
    Remember when our kids were newly diagnosed? And every high and every low sent us feeling a little panicked and helpless? I guess we have to remember that when teaching our children's caregivers.

    I'd rather have a teacher erring on the side of caution than pooh-poohing the numbers. K's kindergarten teacher was really bad about paying attention to her pleas of "I feel shaky" right after diagnosis.

    We seldom use the Dexcom. Because I tend to feel stressed out the entire time, constantly lookign at the numbers. I need to be able to put it on her and learn how to relax a bit
     
  13. Jacob'sDad

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    I've got to admit, Jacob is not using the Dex right now and part of the reason is because he just started middle school and I want to take small steps with his new nurses and teachers. I do intend to introduce the Dex pretty soon though. I really miss it when he is not using it. There's an allergy problem too but that's another story.
     

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