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Desperately seeking: book about diet specifically for TYPE 1

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by headzookeeper, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. headzookeeper

    headzookeeper New Member

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    Hey gang -

    New to the forum and to diabetes, so I'm here for advice from the "pros." =D

    My question today is:
    Does anyone have a recommendation for a good book with diet information and/or recipes specifically for Type 1 diabetics? Or even just a mainstream "diet" that is good for type 1's? All of the books I've found so far lump type 1 and type 2 together (which really bugs me) and then focus mainly on how to eat if you're type 2.

    We strongly prefer a natural approach to eating. For us, allowing our son to have a very small quantity of foods that are sweetened naturally (with sugar, agave, etc.) is preferable to letting him eat lots of low-carb "diet" foods and drinks that are sweetened with chemicals. So a book that relies a lot on chemical sweeteners and other artificial ingredients wouldn't be right for us.

    My 12 yo son was just diagnosed a month ago and we're still in the learning stages of this grand adventure, so any recommendations will be very welcome! =)

    Thanks!
     
  2. danismom79

    danismom79 Approved members

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    I think what would be more useful is for you to learn to calculate the carbs in the food you normally eat. I fell into the trap of "what to feed a child with diabetes" at first too, but they really can eat normally.

    This is what I started out using 5 years ago, and it's the method I still use. I haven't kept up with all the new apps and nutrition scales and such.
     
  3. KatieSue

    KatieSue Approved members

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    I also got some "diabetic" cookbooks when she was first diagnosed before I figured out we don't need them.

    My fitness pal has a pretty good recipe calculator for things you make at home to figure out carbs. And you can save them.
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

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    I agree with danismom79.

    Children with diabetes do not need to have a special "diet". They should be able to (within reason) eat the same way they did before diabetes. The key is to determine the right amount of insulin to give based on portion size and carbs. The Calorie King book/website is a good resource to start with.

    Here are some other books you may find useful:

    Understanding Diabetes (aka The Pink Panther book)
    by Dr. Peter Chase of the Barbara Davis Center at the University of Colorado.
    http://www.childrensdiabetesfdn.org/publications.html

    Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin by Gary Scheiner, Barry Goldstein
    http://www.amazon.com/Think-Like-Pan.../dp/1569244367

    Sweet Kids: How to Balance Diabetes Control & Good Nutrition with Family Peace
    by Betty Page Brackenridge, MS, RD, CDE & Richard R. Rubin, PhD, CDE. Published by the American Diabetes Association, 2002. 250 pages. Softcover.
    http://www.amazon.com/Sweet-Kids-Bal.../dp/1580401244

    Type 1 Diabetes: A Guide for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults -- and Their Caregivers
    by Ragnar Hanas, M.D. Published by Marlowe & Company, New York,
    http://www.amazon.com/Type-Diabetes-.../dp/1569243964
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    I echo Danismom, just get out a calculator and either Calorie King or the Nutrition Data website or any other carb counting source you trust and calculate the carb load of your favorite recipes. A good scale is essential but a Type 1 cook book is not, imho.
     
  6. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    I agree with the previous posters.

    You will find however that over time you'll probably develop your own list of non-nutritious, evil, blood-sugar-spiking foods and drinks to avoid bringing into the home if possible.

    At our end these include soda pop, these weird "veggie chips" sold by the local supermarket, so-called "Smartfood", and a few other items.
     
  7. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    I'd go the route of eating as you always have, arming yourself with Calorie King and a good scale. There are also websites that let you plug in your recipes and it will break down all the nutritional info. This has always worked the best for us.
     
  8. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

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    Not sure where you thought there would be recipes specifically for type 1 diabetics.

    As others have said, just count the carbohydrates in the food you are already preparing and then write it down on the recipe card for future use.

    You don't eat all that differently as a type 1, you just need to inject insulin for the food eaten.

    After a while, you will be a pro at this task.
     
  9. caspi

    caspi Approved members

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    I agree with the others - count the carbs! :) If you have always had a natural approach to eating, keep doing what you're doing and count the carbs. If this is something new because of your son's diagnosis I would be careful of changing all of his diet habits. Food didn't cause his Type 1 and while we all strive to eat healthier, doing too much too soon with a newly diagnosed 12 year old might be a bit overwhelming for him. Just food for thought. ;)
     
  10. nanhsot

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    There is no "diet" for T1, as all have stated you just count carbs and dose appropriately. Continue the healthy lifestyle you have adopted, if that's how you ate before, good job, keep it up.

    I have personally found that low GI foods are helpful, so that might be something to research.

    Welcome, sorry you needed to find this place but glad you did.
     
  11. StacyMM

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    I don't have books, but I do have lists of the glycemic index of various foods. We have a much easier time with post-meal numbers if there are some lower gi foods mixed in and it helps me know when to pre-dose by longer times. So much of it is trial and error and you will soon figure out what foods are just too complicated to deal with on a regular basis. For us, pizza, ice cream and Cheerios are PITAs for my daughter. DS seems to have weird patterns with crackers, and we've also learned to serve smaller portions of pasta because of the delays. So...no special plans or rules but we do pay attention to what is harder to dose for.
     
  12. Traci

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    Welcome. I am in complete agreement with everyone else who has posted. No special diet. Through trial and error you will determine what sends your son skyrocketing (for us, it was marshmallows) and what doesn't (add chocolate and graham crackers to those marshmallows to keep bg nice and steady). Learn the carbs in the foods you normally eat. Like you, we prefer a natural food selection...I think most here avoid sugar free stuff (it can have just as many carbs) with exceptions like sugar free jello. Sugar free syrups send my child sky high while regular syrup does not. Many have issues with pizza, we never have. Your experience may vary...again, it will be trial and error, not some special diet book.
     
  13. wilf

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    Pun intended?! ;)
     
  14. caspi

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    Of course! :p
     
  15. TheTestingMom

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    I agree with everyone else. Count carbs, you'll find it gets easier and easier as time goes by. Also don't forget that counting carbs is art form not scientific, so don't beat yourself up over getting it "perfect".

    The only thing I change is I use Splenda instead of sugar if I'm baking (which is almost never) No one could tell the difference in my banana bread. :)

    (((HUGS)))
     
  16. greenpalm

    greenpalm Approved members

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    I'm still pretty new here too, my daughter was dxd 3/10. But my husband has had D for 14 years.

    I agree completely with everything that's been said, there is no special diet. But I will add that we have made a few changes. Which I'll discuss. One thing that's important to remember is that your son is growing, and he needs the carbs. He needs a normal amount of carbs from quality food sources, just as ANY 12 year old boy would. So, don't reduce how many carbs he eats, just learn how to cover for them (give him insulin)

    Things we changed about our diet after diagnosis:
    1. We started eating a bedtime snack. We never did this before diagnosis, but now, with Lantus, or long acting insulin in her system, we want her to go to bed with a BG at least 100. Sometimes after dinner, she's only around 80, so we have a snack. This snack is one of the times when we've given special thought to what she eats. It's supposed to be 15 g of carbohydrates, but its also supposed to have fat and protein. This is a component of what others have called the glycemic index. The difference is, food with a high glycemic index causes a quick BG spike that burns off quickly, while a food with a low GI will cause a long slow rise in BG, and then level off and slowly drop. So, you'd want a low GI bedtime snack because you want to try to keep him from going low during the night. So 15 grams of carbs in juice is a poor choice, while 15 grams of carbs in trail mix, or a half a peanut butter sandwich, would be better.

    So, there's one place I came up with new recipes. I found a few things she liked that were good snacks, with a low GI.

    2. Another thing we changed was we changed our very rare, occasional soda or snow-cone to sugar free. Truthfully, this is something I'd like to be able to change. I'd prefer her to have real sugar, rather than artificial sweeteners. But, at the moment, we haven't taken the time to try strategies with her to see how we can effectively bolus (dose with insulin) to cover a soda or snow cone. Right now I'm anxious about her having a low because, even though she's on ratios, I've observed that the higher the carbs are in a meal, the more likely she is to go low, which makes sense, because if the ratio is off, the amount of error will increase proportionally to the amount of carbs. Anyway, my point is, that while the normal meals have not changed, and she still eats what she always has, we ARE more careful to get the proportions of carbs/protien/fat more in balance. This is essentially the way EVERYONE is encouraged to eat.

    I'm on my phone, so I'm going to stop typing, but I wanted to back up what others have said. I think you should do your best to eat the way you did before diabetes. You may have to combine foods differently than you used to to get a good balance, juice and a muffin for breakfast might spike BG, but a muffin and milk, or juice and an egg might give you a slower rise that's easier to manage.

    I hope that helps.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2013
  17. swimmom

    swimmom Approved members

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    Welcome. In addition to the great advice you've already received, we measure and weigh foods to get an accurate carb count and use carb factoring. I bought a basic food scale at Target and some extra measuring cups. Over time, we've learned to "eyeball" some foods, but my daughter still weighs and measures quite a lot.

    Here are the links to a couple of carb factor lists:

    http://www.type1parents.org/index.php?page=40

    : http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/pdfs/pdf_2074.pdf

    I've used both of these successfully. I added: chocolate cake = .6
     
  18. Traci

    Traci Approved members

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    Respectfully snipped and going OT for a second...

    We don't do regular soda, but we do regular snow cones! We bolus 60 carbs for a small and have never had an issue. I bolus him a few minutes before we order. We used to get sugar free, but kept having issues (workers would mix regular in the sugar free bottles, the stand that we always loved changed their base or something, they accidentally gave us regular instead of sugar free...it took about three times of ds being over 300 after a supposed sugar free to convince me to get regular and just cover it!). Anyway, sorry for the OT, but hope this might help!:)
     
  19. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

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    I happen to believe that the Standard American Diet is woefully inadequate both for type 1 diabetics and for everyone else too. It is hard to switch away from this but the benefits can be seen in improved BG control.

    IMO a diet consisting of mainly vegetables, some fruit, and natural meats and fats is far superior to what most of us eat most of the time. Mark Sisson has a whole web site and books giving principles to follow and recipes. The diet described by Mark is also consistent but way tastier than the one designed for type 1 diabetics by Dr. Richard Bernstein. His book The Diabetes Solution is a start but is IMO outdated and not palatable. Berstein makes a good argument for the "law of small numbers" - if one eats lots of carbs one will need lots of insulin the result is errors in measurement of both carbs and inslin and variability in the way the body responds to both that results in greater highs and greater lows lows. In comparison a low carb diet will require less insulin and will be easier to measure accurately, will result in less variability and less highs and less lows. Mark comes at it from a vastly different perspective but uses science and his own paradigm to argue that a low carb diet is better for everyone not just diabetics.
     
  20. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The Op already indicated that they eat a healthy diet. No need to presume that you've cornered the market on that. But to bring Bernstein into it? ... Oy.

    You can eat carbs, plenty of carbs all the while passing on the doughnuts and the wonder bread. Kids need carbs, even type 1 kids.

    And this Standard American Diet bs , what makes you presume that the OP or anyone here is eating in any way less healthy than are you? Smug much?
     

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