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Dairy effect on BG - anyone seen anything/know of any research?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by emm142, Mar 11, 2014.

  1. emm142

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    Hi everyone, been sort of absent recently, my mum has had cancer and it's been difficult (I don't think I said here before as for ages she hadn't told family about it and I'm totally identifiable, but she has now). University has also been very busy and I've been spending a lot of time with my lovely girlfriend - holding up a relationship is a challenge alongside everything else!

    Anyway - my question is about dairy. I have bad acne related to testosterone and can't take the pill. I did some reading online and the internet recommended that coming off dairy could help lower testosterone and hence improve acne. So I've been off dairy for around 6 weeks, and weirdly my insulin needs have decreased quite a bit. When I went off the wagon briefly I had a pretty big spike.

    So I wondered what you guys had seen with milk vs. no milk? Is this a coincidence? Is it just me? I did notice as a teenager that y cereal spike got a lot lower with soy/almond milk, this might be similar... Also if anyone knows of any actual research, I'd be interested in that too :)
     
  2. mmgirls

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    well I have never looked into it but I would assume that maybe testosterone causes insulin resistance, or a higher basal need and so when you lowered your dairy and testosterone you now are more insulin sensitive or your basal need has dropped.

    Very interesting, what is the connection between dairy and testosterone?

    Edited to ask
    When did you change your major?
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Hi Emma ;-)

    I have nothing on the diary question, sorry, I wish I did.

    Nice to see you. So sorry about your mom's illness, I hope she's getting great care.
     
  4. RomeoEcho

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    I saw exactly the same thing when I had to eliminate dairy. I thought it was probably related to the fact that my body was responding to the dairy and thus raising bg, but given the standard cereal+milk problem, maybe it's not so simple.
     
  5. Ali

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    Emm
    No answer to dairy but acne yes. If you can afford it find the best dermatologist and get them to work with you. It may take a year of trying various regimes but the help for acne is fantastic. But you do need a dermatologist who cares. Hate to say it but probably a woman Dr and one who had acne. It is not simple to help but doable. You may need to go in every three months for a year till you find the right stuff to treat and then revisit yearly or if stuff changes. FWIW the Clarisonic brush helps. Not alone but helps Meds work better. Good luck.
    Ali
     
  6. Megnyc

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    I'm not sure but I don't eat/drink a lot of dairy and I use less insulin than would one expect. Around .3 units/kg currently. The only dairy I have is a small yogurt a few times a week. I don't drink milk (just don't like it...).

    I actually just had to stop taking the pill and have acne for the first time in my life. Which is really frustrating at 20 and just doing wonders to my self esteem :rolleyes: <--- the old rollie got taken away :(. I feel like I am too old for this! My doctor suggested spironolactone might help in the same way the pill would?? Not sure if that has been mentioned to you. I would see a dermatologist but apparently at least where I live they don't really treat "mild" acne with any prescription meds. It doesn't feel that mild when I am the one that has it though!!! I ordered some special face wash on amazon so maybe that will help. Lol, all my friends are years past this and I am scouring the drug store for all sorts of creams.

    I hope your mom is getting excellent care and is as comfortable as possible. And I hope you are getting loads of support from your family and girlfriend. Hang in there :cwds:
     
  7. cdninct

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    I've noticed the same thing that you did at breakfast. Even a very low-carb breakfast that was accompanied by milk caused a spike, but when I clued into the fact that milk was the only constant and started substituting almond milk, it definitely helped. The dairy effect does not seem nearly as pronounced at other times of the day, though.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    You know, I am now remembering that one person tried to convince me to have my second dd stop with milk products to try to prevent type 1. Their science behind their claim was that the milk protein is very very similar to the shape of beta cells, and milk is for baby cows not humans.

    I wish I had time to look at this, but have a lot going on.
     
  9. shannong

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    I have nothing to add about the dairy, but as far as acne goes, I have had to deal with it all my life (now in my 40's). I don't think there is anything that I have not tried - antibiotics, accutane, laser, etc. In my 20's and 30's, I finally started using plain old benzoyl peroxide (BP) and it kept me clear for over a decade. I started out using the pro-active system, but then they changed their formula and I found I preferred acne.org products. The key is using it every single day. My skin has changed in my 40's, so it is not really effective for me anymore but for younger skin it was amazingly effective - far more than any prescription products (that came with side effects). I would suggest you check out acne.org website because they have some great information on it.
     
  10. Michelle'sMom

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    I'm sorry to hear of your mom's illness.

    I have a few links stored on my laptop, which I don't have access to right now but I will be happy to share. In the meantime, some of the info we've gained from my dd's various drs:

    Low testosterone is linked to insulin resistance in men, but has the opposite effect in women. My dd's levels were extremely high when she was dx'd with PCOS 2 years ago. She was horribly insulin resistant.

    Her dermatologist & gyn have both recommended we remove dairy to help with the acne & also the PCOS symptoms, due to hormones in the products. We've seen a slight improvement in her skin since taking their advice 6 months ago. Interestingly, since we removed all dairy her insulin needs have dropped by about 15%. We use almond milk & no longer much of a breakfast spike at all.
     
  11. RomeoEcho

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    This was my experience as well. I can eat cereal and milk every day if I want to when I use almond milk.
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    I know nothing about dairy and BGs, but I just wanted to say how great it is to see you again, Emma. I've been wondering about you! I'm so sorry to hear that you mom has been ill. :(
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    As much as it sucks, acne can strike at any age. Mine comes and goes. I'm 25. If it helps any, I use the st.ives apricot scrub.
     
  14. emm142

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    Thanks for the replies everyone - this one stuck out. Last week (after making this post) I went to the GP for a different reason - absent periods for almost half a year - and they ran hormone tests. My LH was way high (4x the top of the normal range) and testosterone out of the female normal and well into male normal!

    So I officially have PCOS. Sort of at a loss as to what to do about it, since I'm normal weight and have a high level of fitness (run 4-5 miles 3 or 4 times a week). Has your daughter been given any more dietary advice about PCOS and T1? I've been referred to an endo and dietician in my uni town (GP had been managing diabetes) and the clinic here is brilliant so they should be helpful, but it's the NHS so the referral could well take 2 or 3 months to come through...
     
  15. Melissata

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    My daughter takes Aldactone, the endo describes it as a testosterone mop. Her acne wasn't bad, but for someone that never had any as a teen it was an issue. She has been on it for a few years now, but we recently increased it a bit after labs and the fact that her skin had become a bit oily again. Facial hair can be an issue also with PCOS. Aldactone helps with all of it. Her periods are now normal as well. She is also taking Metformin.
     
  16. emm142

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    Thanks for the information - I used to take cyproterone acetate which is also an antiandrogen - but I found that it really had an adverse effect on my muscle-building, which is kind of important to me as an athlete. I'm not sure at what point the benefits of an antiandrogen outweighs that disadvantage. Did your daughter have problems with insulin resistance? My diabetes is poorly controlled (a1C 8.8) but my BGs are all over the place, not just high. In the past week I've been down below 45 and HI over 600, at exactly the same time of day with no apparent different cause. My insulin doses are only around 35U/day though and my weight is normal, so I'm not sure that they would use Metformin.. Argh it's so complicated.
     
  17. Michelle'sMom

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    I'm sorry for the dx, but glad you've found an answer. I had completely forgotten about posting the links I mentioned. I'll try to get those posted as soon as I can. In the meantime, off the top of my head, these are a few things we've learned. The incidence of PCOS in women (& adolescents) with T1 is increasing. It's believed to be related to tighter control & higher insulin use, but there are few studies specifically relating to the T1/PCOS connection. There is a slight difference in hormone levels in PCOS with T1s, as opposed to non-Ds. Specifically SHBG levels, although I can't remember the details right now. T1s also seem to exhibit milder symptoms than non-Ds.

    We were sent to the dietician at our endo clinic at our visit just prior to the PCOS dx. At that time, the endo was convinced her weight gain was due to our inaccurate carb counting, improper diet, or sneaking food. The dietician was no help at all. She criticized our lower carb lifestyle (CWDs can eat anything etc), & we failed her carb counting test due to not eating much of anything on the test, so no need to know the carb counts. :confused: Her gyn, who took over after I requested that our primary do all the tests for PCOS, suggested we see a dietician more familiar with PCOS treatment. We were encouraged to stick with the lower carb lifestyle, & any carbs she does eat should be low GI. She also has a rigorous workout regimen. Over the last 8 months, we've begun reducing gluten. Those, combined with 1500mg per day of Metformin seem to be working. Metformin is anti-androgenic. We've seen a huge reduction in insulin needs over the last year & a half, which is one of the major goals of her treatment. High circulating levels of insulin only worsen the testosterone production, so reducing insulin was our first goal. I know, it's totally contrary to the popular stance of "she needs what she needs." We tried Lo LoEstrin (very low-dose estrogen contraceptive) for several months, but it doubled her insulin needs & she stopped taking it a year ago.

    There is some excellent first-hand experience with PCOS at SoulCysters.

    There's also some good, basic info here
     
  18. Michelle'sMom

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    High levels of testerone are not good, for many reasons. If your treatment involves an anti-androgen, you might try upping your protein intake to counteract the muscle loss. My dd uses whey protein in smoothies after her workouts. Her muscle tone is actually quite good.
     
  19. Lakeman

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    The body eliminates various wastes and excess steroid hormones (both estrogen and testosterone) by binding them to chemicals from the liver and sending them out through the bowels. There is an enzyme (which we get too much of if we eat too much sugar) that breaks the bonds so that these wastes and hormones are then recycled resulting in our body having too much of them. Calcium D glucarate is a supplement that inhibits the enzyme so that wastes and excess hormones are properly eliminated. One could buy it at a vitamin store, eat lots of apples, or consume pectin to get calcium G glucarate - under a doctors care of course.

    Since estrogen and testosterone are supposed to be in balance in our bodies could it be that the estrogen from the milk is causing your body to produce more testosterone in order to achieve a misguided balance? Or is it just the lactose and not the estrogen increasing resistance?
     
  20. Michelle'sMom

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    PCOS: The Hidden Epidemic, by Samuel Thatcher MD. Great resource, although it doesn't mention much about PCOS in T1.

    PCOS: Cosmetic & Dietary Approaches

    The link between polycystic ovary syndrome and both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

    High prevalence of the polycystic ovary syndrome and hirsutism in women with type 1 diabetes

    Identification of the Source of Androgen Excess in Hyperandrogenic Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    From the study below: "In type 1 girls, testosterone levels were higher in those with mi-croalbuminuria compared to those without, even among those with similar hemoglobin A1C levels. Amin concluded that development of microalbuminuria at puberty might reflect not only poor glycemic control, but also changes in ovarian function in the setting of aggressive insulin therapy. The study suggests that it is the aggressive insulin therapy used to control hyperglycemia which leads to increased weight gain as well as ovarian hyper-androgenism. Perhaps other alternative therapies, such as insulin sensitizers might be explored as options to reduce the progression of these microvascular changes."

    PCOS and hyperandrogenism in type 1 diabetes
     

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