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Dad/ada

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by dejahthoris, May 31, 2011.

  1. dejahthoris

    dejahthoris Approved members

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  2. Christopher

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    It sounds like the parents were constantly overcorrecting for lows and then having to deal with highs. Seems like a pretty basic thing to learn how to correct. Aside from that, the child "checks his meter" 20 times a day? And that is WITH a dog?? No, TWO dogs. Wow.

    As for the new guidelines, it is not good news for people who use animals other than dogs or miniature horses as service animals:

    "The new recommendations limit service animals to dogs and housebroken miniature horses. The new guidelines are not binding to states, municipalities and other agencies, which are free to adopt the policy or to make their own."

    And this:

    "Stricter Americans with Disabilities Act rules that took effect in March allow businesses to refuse service to people whose animals are not dogs or small horses providing approved forms of service.

    The new regulations changed the definition of what constitutes a "service animal". Formerly a vague definition stating that service animals merely perform a task for someone with a disability, which could include serving as an emotional companion, the rule now says they must be rigorously trained dogs or small horses assisting people with physical complications, not emotional ones.

    Federal officials declined a request for comment on the new guidelines. But the rule change is seen as a response to the proliferation of service animals in the years since passage of the act. That proliferation has sometimes caused problems for businesses scared to refuse service to people with problematic animals."
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    I am finding myself amused at the thought of attempting to go to Nordstrom with my minature horse service animal. Although it might come in handy for carrying purchases. Hmmmmm....
     
  4. emm142

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    Didn't make it through the article because I don't have my glasses and I'm not good at reading whole articles without them :p but does it explain why he needs two service dogs, rather than one?

    CGM works for me, but if some people find a dog more helpful, that's great for them. I'd struggle to deal with the fact that if I had an alert dog people around me would be obviously able to see a) that I have diabetes at all and b) when I have specific high and low BGs, which I'm somewhat private about.
     
  5. dejahthoris

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    Not judging either way on the article. It just made me aware there are new ADA standards as of March. I wonder if there is a synopsis anywhere of the new standards or how they affect type 1 diabetics in any way, besides in reference to service animals, that is.
     
  6. MReinhardt

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    The law does not effect anyone who has a DAD. Believe it or not, someone claimed an iguana as a service animal. The ADA wanted to put more clarity and define what is a service animal.

    I dont get the idea about why he has two DADs.

    My opinion, but I dont think training a DAD jumping on someone for an alert is a good idea. Growling for an alert also, Yikes! There are other ways to have them alert an individual. (like I said my opinion)
     
  7. ecs1516

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    'Checks 20 times a day'?? I just don't get this.
     
  8. KatieJane'smom

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    I understood the article to say there are "three" dogs. I don't understand that unless they are puppy raising or helping to train other dogs to be used for other people. We happen to have 3 service dogs in my home but one of them, Dot, is retired due to health problems and is now just a pet (although she still alerts, she doesn't go out as a service animal any more). My dd has a diabetic alert dog that she uses 24 hrs. a day at school and anywhere else she goes, and I have a mobility dog that I don't take out much but she helps around the house.
    I also don't understand the need to be testing 20 times a day??? Unless they are in the beginning stages of training. A person should actually have to test much LESS with an alert dog, not more often.

    There is actually a woman in Ft. Worth that I'm wondering if this is hindering. She is legally blind and rides her full size horse a few miles into town to the grocery store to buy groceries and back home. The horse not only carries her purchases but carries her because she is unable to drive;)

    Actually, a person with a service dog does not have to divulge what their disability is at all and the dog's alert can be so discreet that no one else even notices. My daughter's dog lays under her feet/desk at school and nudges her with his nose when she's high and puts his paw on her when she's low. Usually, the teachers and other students don't even notice when he alerts her to changes in her blood sugar.
    In my opinion it is oftentimes not appropriate for a service dog to jump or growl/bark for an alert. It just seems very disruptive in some situations (church or school for example) and there are so many other options for alerts that are less distracting.

    I would only think this was necessary during the very early scent-training for the dog to confirm alerts. If this (these?) are working service dogs they should be alerting when a blood sugar test is needed. Except for meals, my dd sometimes doesn't need to check her bg unless the dog alerts. He has never given a "false" alert - never alerted her when her bg is normal. He checks her often but does not alert which means that she is in her targeted range and is neither falling nor rising.

    It's hard to say if this is just a poorly written article or if there was a bunch of missing information. There is much of it that doesn't make sense to me.

    To the OP, besides the ADA cracking down on what constitutes a service animal (to exclude snakes and such), the new guidelines also created stricter enforcements for schools who have formally refused access for service dogs. We were given a copy of the new guidelines as it pertains to public schools at the district where I'm employeed but it's on my desk at my office so I'm unable to quote it for you right this minute. Basically, ADA is stepping in to enforce access in school districts where it has been denied.
     
  9. dejahthoris

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    Katiejanesmom:

    When I saw a mention in this article that the American Disabilities Act had its standards updated in March, all I was wondering is the updates affected people with diabetes in any way- from what I am gathering so far, the updates help those with a DAD.

    Thank you for addressing my question.

    Have a great day:)
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2011
  10. emm142

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    Yeah, I was questioning the jumping up as an alert - it doesn't seem entirely appropriate. Especially since I've read on here about alert dogs occasionally alerting on people other than their owner!

    About divulging disabilities, even if I didn't have to say exactly what my disability was, it would still make me feel visibly disabled to have a dog which was clearly a service dog with me. I guess it's just a personal hang up, since I couldn't care less about people seeing my CGM sensor.. :rolleyes: I would love it if one of our dogs decided to alert me to highs and lows around the house, though. :p I think it's a really personal choice when people get a DAD - it's probably not something that the majority of people with diabetes could use (or afford!) but those who have managed to stick with a DAD seem to really love having one.
     
  11. Christopher

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    I think for me, even if you didn't "divulge" why you needed a dog, it would still be abundantly clear that you had one and that there was SOME reason why there was a dog sitting in the theatre, or the class room, or the restaurant, with you. Not so discreet. Some people are fine with that, others not so much. To each their own.
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2011
  12. MReinhardt

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