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D hypo (thetical)

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Barry, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. Barry

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    I was cleaning out the filing cabinet yesterday and ran across a Vet file for Bubba, a very friendly Boxer that I had when Alex was born. Great pics of Bubba tongue washing Alex in his toddler years. When Alex was 3, (and Bubba was probably 4) Bubba started acting sick, drinking a lot of water, losing weight, etc. You got it. Vet said shots, daily, were necessary because Bubba was not making insulin (although never called it "diabetes".

    By that time Bubba was in pretty bad shape and we made the decision to put Bubba down vs. seeing him (what I now understand) being insulin dependant.

    10 yrs later Alex gets the same news.

    I wondered last night the hypothetical....If we had a "Bubba" (with Alex being D for 5 yrs now) and it became insulin dependant, would we do the same thing? Would Bubba be the first canine w/ a POD? Would we risk the psychological effects on Alex of putting down his pet for having diabetes? Would we use supplies from our insurance company:cool:?

    We have never told Alex the dog in the pics was euthanized due to diabetes. That'd be an interesting conversation, no?

    I re-read the preface to Final Exit where Derek Humphries (president of Hemlock Society) states that "human beings are the only animal that human beings will allow to suffer endlessly."

    Food for thought,
    Barry
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    We had a cat with diabetes. He was diagnosed right after Jack was born. I gave him insulin shots for 3 years until he died at age 15. It really wasn't that big of a deal. He was a lot more cooperative about the shots than Jack was. :rolleyes:
     
  3. Lance

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    Now that we have a grandson with D, I look back on our dog having it, and wonder if the regular insulin shots were really effective in doing anything but prolonging pain and suffering. There were no bg checks, no matching insulin to actual needs - we were instructed to feed her the same amount of food at every meal and to give a specific amount of insulin. That was it. And we all know how well that works! :rolleyes:

    Knowing what we know now, her bg must have been all over the place, still high most, if not all, of the time. She had numerous complications, and ultimately had to be put down. If a pet could be managed in the same way as our kids, I suppose they could be controlled as well.

    So even though it's not a conversation I'd ever want to have with one of our kids, I suspect that pets with d may often show what the results of long-term highs can be. Sad.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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    I don't know if the same is true for dogs, but our vet (who I really like and trust) told us that cats don't have to be kept in as tight of a range as humans to avoid complications. She said that as long as they're symptom-free, that you're controlling the D well-enough to keep them healthy. I'm sure that was an oversimplification (and probably meant to placate me, as I was 8 months pregnant and bawling in the vet clinic, wondering how I was ever going to handle a diabetic cat :rolleyes:).
     
  5. Barry

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    There were no bg checks, no matching insulin to actual needs - we were instructed to feed her the same amount of food at every meal and to give a specific amount of insulin. That was it. And we all know how well that works! :rolleyes:
    ironically..... close to standard D care only 20 yrs ago.
     
  6. sarahspins

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    I think in large part, animals just don't live long enough to develop some of the more serious conditions... and there are a lot of age-related diseases that already seem to mirror many of the effects of uncontrolled diabetes, so you may not be dealing with much "different" with a diabetic pet vs one that is not.

    Personally, I wouldn't have a problem caring for a diabetic pet... dogs and cats generally shouldn't be on high carb diets to begin with (well, at least mine aren't - we feed grain free foods), so their management would in turn be much simpler.
     
  7. emm142

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    This made me remember in 10th grade I was in History class sitting with a girl I didn't really know, and she saw me do a BG check.

    "Oh, you're diabetic! I understand how you feel; my dog was diagnosed last year." Because obviously, having a dog dx'd is roughly equivalent to being dx'd yourself.. :rolleyes:

    Everytime something D related happened (lows, highs, etc.) she would draw parallels between me and her dog. It was actually rather amusing.
     
  8. Barry

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    debating whether I would of bit, humped or stole her shoe
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2010
  9. Lance

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    Now THAT'S funny! :D
     
  10. Kaylas mom

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    Oh man, that is hilarious!
     
  11. madde

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    I can't express in writing how extremely FUNNY I find this....oh man, that WAS GREAT!!:D
     
  12. BrokenPancreas

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    When I first saw the post, I was thinking if you thought maybe somehow the dog gave your child a virus, then I saw your child was dx ten years later.

    My dog had pancreatitis <sp> and died about five months before my daughter was dx, and he was a kissy dog.

    I always wonder if that had something to do with it.:confused:
     
  13. Christopher

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    I guess it really depends on how much you value a life. Many people believe all life is sacred and would do anything to preserve that life. And then you weigh that against the expected quality of life living with the disease state. Diabetes is a "manageable" disease so I would find it difficult to terminate an animal's life based only on them having diabetes.
     
  14. MamaC

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    Kidding, right?
     
  15. BrokenPancreas

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    No.. At the time, I was so desperate for a reason that this happened.
    Now, I know, the doctor must of thought I was a loon, but yea, that first night in the hospital, I was just trying to make sense of things, and that popped in my mind, so I asked....
     
  16. valerie k

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    Well, thats what I thought. Matt was diagnoses in january, and I found my penelope in april. I also was taken to her, becouse she was a special needs dog with Juvenile diabetes. She has had this since puppyhood.. not getting it at an advanced type 2 diabetes like most pets. So thinking, I have a child with diabetes, and what the heck, how hard can it be to deal with a dog...

    This dog has cost me thousands upon thousands with no help from insurence at all. She requires a curve about every 3-4 months... thats 130.00. She requires insulin daily, 2X. I used to use vetsulin a dog insulin... its now off the market. Now I must use a 70/30 mix. I have to buy boxes of syringes. I cheat and use matts strips to test her, or I would have to buy them as well. And yes, I do test her. and its NOT easy to test a dog. they dont like seeing the meter come out of the case.

    My other dog, I just inherited, Blu, is also diabetic. type 2. He also has absolutely no pancreas anymore. So add on a special enzyme to his food 2x daily, to match up with his 2x daily shots. Toss in those glucose curves every 3-4 months. And instead of A1Cs, they have another name for it, thats another 45.00 on top of my 130.00.

    However, I wouldnt change anything for nothing. I love those dogs and am grateful that I can take care of them. Easy-sure. as easy as taking care of our kids.:D
     
  17. BrokenPancreas

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    Can I give you a cyber hug for how wonderful you are!!!!
    In the OT section, there is purebred pom with diabetes, FYI!!!
     
  18. Flutterby

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    A friend of mine has 3 diabetic cats.. she checks their bg multiple times a day and adjust their insulin needs to what their bg is.. if she went blindly at it, like her vet wanted her to, most likely one cat would have gone to hypo.. dose was WAY to high, she caught the cat in the 30s (although their bg is much lower than ours runs in a normal range.. they usually ride around 60/70is..).
     

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