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Correction factor for 7 year old

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by cm4kelly, Dec 29, 2014.

  1. cm4kelly

    cm4kelly Approved members

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    Since we have been off for the holidays, I have really been thinking that our pumping correction factor is way off. We have barely changed it since we started pumping several years ago.

    My 7 year old weighs about 60 pounds and uses roughly 20 - 22 units of insulin per day (TDD).

    Our correction factor now is 1 unit : 210.

    It seems not to be sufficient. I looked up some calculators which show 1800/TDD (20) = correction factor of 90! That is way different than what we have.
    Thinking about going down to 150 to give it a shot - not all the way to 100.

    Anyone have any knowledge or comparison for correction factor for pump?
     
  2. bradclark

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    It's been a while, but it seems like my son's correction factor was right around 100 at that age. I wouldn't be afraid to try 150 for a few days and just watch it closely.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    We were 150 from 4 years until 11. That was both MDI and then on to the pump. Up until puberty, 150 worked like a charm.
     
  4. cm4kelly

    cm4kelly Approved members

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    Thank you for your input. Think we are going to try the 1:150 ratio, and I will watch him since we are home for the Christmas holidays.

    Happy New Year!
     
  5. Beach bum

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    Yes, this is a great time to trouble shoot. You will know in the first day or two how well it's going to work.
     
  6. Mo1

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    My DD diagnosed a year ago tomorrow. She is 7 , weighs 70 lbs, TDD 23-25 units, and correction factor 90 since about 2 months ag from 110. We've been pumping since June. Good luck, I find all of the variables hard, and tweaking's still new to me.
     
  7. jenm999

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    My son is 7 and weighs 60 pounds and his correction factor is 100.
     
  8. KHS22

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    my 4 y/o who weighs around 40lbs is at 9-10 correction factor at different times, which is 160-180.... so seems reasonable that your kiddo would be lower...
     
  9. mwstock

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    My son is nine and weighs around ninety five pounds. His current correction factor is 1:60. The default setting on the pump is at 1:50. The correction ratio has been anywhere from 60-100 for us. It is hard to isolate the correction factor. It is the amount that one unit drops the blood sugar within 3-4 hours. You first have to dial in the basal rates, then the bolus rate (carb ratios) and the last is the adjust the correction factor. It is very important to do basal testing. One thing that really helped us, was setting insulin duration at four hours. It is a lot of trial and error. My son historically has been very sensitive to insulin. Each child is different. Unfortunately there is not a one size fits all.
     
  10. Grinch

    Grinch New Member

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    My daughter weighs 60 lb. and just turned 8 yrs old and gets about 19u TDD Novolog thru her pump. Her current correction factor is 80 and I've been thinking it's not enough insulin to correct. I don't think a bolus for a high with a correction factor of 210 would make her CGM dots go down even slightly. But obviously everyone has a unique sensitivity.

    Gary Scheiner's book "Think Like a Pancreas" has a good section on figuring out the sensitivity factor. I think it assumes that basal rates and I:C ratios are already fine-tuned. He also explains why it's common for sensitivity factors to be different at night than during the daytime. He recommends the 1700 rule (close enough to the 1800 you mentioned I'm sure) - take total daily insulin and divide that number into 1700...and that's a good place to start and then fine tune from there...but of course a healthcare provider should always be consulted with before making changes to insulin dosage... :)
     
  11. wilf

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    I would for sure go to 150, and be prepared to go lower during the day. The 150 might not be bad for night time corrections.
     
  12. cdninct

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    My son is 6, and is lighter and requires less insulin than your son, but our daytime correction factor is 1:160, and our nighttime correction factor is 1:210. I don't know why they are so different, but they just are! You might consider working with one part of the day at a time.
     
  13. mmgirls

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    10 year old at ISF of 90 ( 75 for breakfast)which is a more recent drop from 110, she is 64lbs. My youngest at 40lbs and DX in March is 175 ISF (125 for breakfast)
    .
     
  14. Theo's dad Joe

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    I have a question about this. My son's correction factor is currently around 125-155. Let's say is carb ratio is 20:1, am I right to assume that 20 grams of uncovered carbs should raise his blood sugar by 125-155 points by say 4 hours down the line. Not that it will work of course, but is that how the model works?

    I am a little surprised because I read some sources that say that for his weight (about 55 pounds) that a gram of carbs would make his blood sugar go up 7-10 points but others say more like 15 points per gram. That would be 300 points for the 20 grams of carbs, while 7-10 points would be 140-200 which would not be out of line with the correction factor.

    Do people see a standard number of points coming from a gram of carbs at a certain bodyweight? Typically if I give him a snack outside of the 4 hour bolus window I get about a 7 point rise per gram. He still has enough of a honeymoon to take off maybe a couple of grams an hour, but 4 months ago he could still clear 6-7 grams an hour without bolus.

    Anyway I am trying to figure out his TRUE carb ratio since I am currently covering some of his basal with mealtime bolus, that way if I increase or decrease his carbs at a meal I can adjust but factor out the basal part.
     
  15. kail

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    I think the 1700 or 1800 rule only applies if you are not in your honeymoon. (edited to say--never mind this. just looked back to OP and I doubt this is a factor)

    For Theo's dad-- In the first year with my daughter she would reliably rise about 4-5 points per gram of carbohydrate and her insulin ratio was 1:60. 30 grams of carbs would bump her 120-150 and half a unit would bring her down 120 -150. What I find odd now is that half a unit still brings her down about 120-140 but eating 1 gram of carbohydrates will bump her up about 15 points. I often correct drifting about-to-be-lows with a single large smartie (0.8grams) and it bumps her nicely from 75 to 85-90 for example.
     

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