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Consequences of lows at a young age

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Budapest, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. Budapest

    Budapest Approved members

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    Hi,

    We kind of suspect that the difficulties our son has with learning (primarily learning to read Hebrew) might be related to lows he experienced over the years.

    He is now 8, repeating first grade and falling behind with Hebrew reading again, Dx @ 22 mo, never lost conscientiousness, but has had a fair share of lows below 50.

    Can anyone suggest any source of information (person, website, publication etc.) where we could find out more about how to deal with the learning/development aspect of the situation and how to attempt to diagnose his issues?

    Thank you.
     
  2. C6H12O6

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    You would have to look into testing him for a learning disability in general. Learning disability testing involves a whole battery of tests including Wechsler intelligence scale for children.

    Just to clarify, a person can be gifted and have a learning disability. If a child scored below average on all subsets of the testing that would not be an LD, it would be a developmental delay. Also, a person could achieve good scores across the board and still be diagnosed with an LD. Example - the child?s score on nonverbal tasks could be in the 90th percentile, and their score on verbal tasks could fall in the 60th percentile. The disparity between a person?s verbal and nonverbal abilities can make them less capable of learning when conventional teaching methods are used.

    Your, first step is to inquire about learning disability testing and how it is funded in your country. They may want to hold off testing depending on your son?s age. A diagnosis can help to develop teaching strategies that work for him.

    There is really no point in dwelling on if diabetes contributed to your son having an LD. I am sure parents may wonder if severe DKA at diagnosis could contribute to LD also. But many children have LDs and they don?t have diabetes

    Depending on if he has an LD and the type the advice you get from people whose children are learning to read and being educated in English might not be all that relevant. English is not graphophonemically consistent so children being educated in English w. certain types of LDs are at more of a disadvantage

    The Orton-Gillingham apparently has good results for children with reading and writing related difficulties
     
  3. Ali

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    Yes you can be gifted and have a LD. A classic sign of this is when you do a full battery of testing for a learning disability-usually a two or three day stint of two to three hour testing sessions and at the end you look at a graph of their performance and it goes across at 90 percent performance or above and then for a section of tests drops down below 50 percent or lower. So if all their testing was at that 50 percent no alarms would go off but it is the uneven results that usually indicate a learning disability. Without a full battery of testing it can be hard to diagnose if your kid is above average in intelligence. Ali
     
  4. Ali

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    Wanted to add to my prior post. Who knows if the lows contributed, he may have had a learning issue without the T1 it is irrelevant at this point if he in fact has a LD. The main thing is to test and find out and then work on helping him learn how to learn in the classroom setting. You can not change the whys-maybe genetics, something during the 9 months of pregnancy, or a million other things. The critical point is to just find out how to help your child work with their strengths and weaknesses and how to self advocate. So much of this stuff ends up being a non issue once the child leaves the artificial school setting, in fact even once they enter college it is often a non issue. For where to look. Contact a school for gifted children and ask who they have do their testing. You need a good LD psych person to do the testing not just any psych person. The tests and how they do them can be critical. Ask around in the gifted programs and ask in the programs aimed at kids with issues. Research the names given you and then work with one of them. But they should clearly before meeting with you but on the phone discuss their methods of testing, and it should involve more than a one or two hour session.Good luck. Ali
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2012

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