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college living space

Discussion in 'Parents of College Kids and Young Adults with Type' started by susanH, Sep 1, 2007.

  1. susanH

    susanH Approved members

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    my son was in a suite with 3 other guys last year and this year as well. it is a huge area, 2 big bedrooms, a small kitchen, big bathroom, livingroom/dining area, big storage closet...it's very roomy and very liveable. however, this year all 3 of his roomies leave every weekend cuz they live within a reasonable drive; we are 3 hours away.

    essentially, he is living alone every weekend. he does socialize with other kids in other dorms or off campus but he is in that apartment at night alone alot of the time.

    he was diagnosed at age 3 and has always been very tightly controlled, but not so tightly that he is prone to lows all the time. i can't remember his last severe low and i anticipated his living alone at some point in his life, just not now, not at 19.

    how do you feel about your college kid having their own room?

    at least i think he's alone:eek: ;)
     
  2. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

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    :D I think you know him well enough to know. But, I suppose that could change as the school year goes along. ;)

    The being alone issue has not been something I have faced yet. That is a concern for sure. Dean is in a house of 8 this year off campus, but he'll have his own room. They'll be another type 1 diabetic friend in the house too.

    Do you think maybe as the year goes on the roommates might stop going home as frequently and stay close to campus? Perhaps it's only in this transitional time that they're heading home. I guess time will tell....
     
  3. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I'm worried too about the single, but I think our job as parents is to raise our children to make it in the world and to feel confident in themselves. I spend a lot of time biting my tongue about my fears as a mom. You're not alone in your worries. My son was also a toddler at dx, now in his 2nd year of college.

    BTW, my son said his room this year is the size of a prison cell. My husband came home and disagreed. He said it's smaller than a prison cell because at least a cell can fit a toilet in it ;).
     
  4. susanH

    susanH Approved members

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    my son's school has a drawing for single rooms. he entered it last year and was not chosen, i'm sure he'll go for it again this spring. he seems to think it's a privacy issue; he's said he hates changing his set out "with an audience" although the other boys have never raised an eyebrow as far as the D stuff goes.

    do you think living in a single room, D or not, can be very isolating? having roommates forces you to interact, they pull you into a circle and i'd think socializing or meeting new people might be more difficult while living alone? anyway, my concerns are both one of socialization and isolation. can't help thinking about lows at night and being alone. :( i guess i'm just programmed that way, we probably all are to some extent. it's like i know nothing else.

    he is lucky to have gotten one of the more "spacious" living areas on campus again this year. the single is most likely cell like!
     
  5. Hollyb

    Hollyb Approved members

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    D aside, I think a single room is great. I was in a residence that had all single rooms and while you still met lots of people (they were all around you, all the time!) it was really great to be able to go to your own space, close the door, and work or just be alone.

    Granted I'm on the introverted side. But you had to be a real loner not to make friends in that setting.
     

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