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CGMS start tomorrow, give me a crash course of what I need to know

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by zell828, Feb 11, 2009.

  1. zell828

    zell828 Approved members

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    I know we can use arms as sites, we are definitely going to push for us to do this as well as back end as right now she only uses the back end for her pump. I don't want to "chew" up her poor back end otherwise :(

    I also know about being able to leave a sensor in for 7 days. On the 7th day the transmitter shuts down and has to be recharged even though the battery life is good for 14 days. So we are looking at going 7 days tops and changing sensor same day each week. Every 3rd day we have to trick the system though and tell it is a new sensor. Does anyone have step by step directions on how we do this or is it the same as when you first start a sensor?

    I know about the radio shack microphone and web site where to buy it if we need it. We will try it without for now at first and see if it is necessary. We do have a baby monitor in her room.

    I did make up a pump/CGMS guide cheat sheet and gave that to the school nurse. I also made up user guides for her, Bio Mom and us in nice folders to keep.

    We have to calibrate at least 3-4 times a day, never calibrate when there are trend arrows.

    Don't have the pump away from the transmitter for longer than 40 minutes or it will alarm that it lost transmission. Then just put BG in and calibrate to get it going again if it does happen.

    Anything I said wrong or I need to know for tomorrow? I am getting nervous! Thanks!
     
  2. betty6333

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    we don't have a mm but I just wanted to wish you luck ! it sounds like you have done your homework!
     
  3. 22jules

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    We start ours Friday so I just wanted to say good luck and I'll be keeping a close eye on this thread!

    Julie (mom to Jessica 13 and Erin 10 dx 2-9-07 pumping M522)
     
  4. Logansmom

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    40 minutes seems like a lot. We had our sensor away from the pump during bath on the first night and it has lost sensor within 10 minutes. I'd keep it on the counter during the bath, we started that and haven't had an issue. Put in the bedroom and we have an issue.

    I think it's really trial and error and see what works for you. What worked for us is turning off high alarms while we are getting used to it and leaving low alarm at 65. The opposite or a modification of it may work for you. Just put the baby monitor on loud and you can't miss it. Although I am sleep deprived from constantly thinking I hear it and don't, I'm sure that will go away eventually.

    Good luck! We just started ours last week, it's invaluable.
     
  5. cwdAdmin

    cwdAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    Sharing experiences can be so helpful when starting out with a new product.

    Just a gentle reminder to consider contacting the manufacturer if you have product questions. And to note the manufacturer's suggested usage and expiration dates.

    Be safe!
     
  6. DebbieR

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    We started about a month ago with both children. You have a great list, you are well prepared. I think what I would suggest though is be clear what your objectives are for the first month or so - we went into it excited we could now catch lows, catch highs, see trends, fix basals, deal with post-meal spikes etc etc. That's really too much for the first couple of months while you are getting used to the sensor! The high & low alarms can be a pain if they are set too tight - they go off in class, everyone looks, and we had a lot of huffing from the kids about "the stupid sensor". So have a think what you want to tackle - is it highs, is it lows, do you just want to see trends and then take action? Then adjust (or switch off) the alarms to fit what you want. Looking back my objectives would have been (1) get used to operating the sensor (2) learn how to calibrate well (so sensor and bg are within 20 points most of the time) (3) monitor meal spikes and take action (i.e. what a difference pre-bolusing makes! You'll see.)

    As for "Lost Sensor" - I agree, that was our biggest disappointment. The transmitter loses all its stored information if it cannot re-connect to the pump within 40 minutes. And within that 40 mins you have to remember that the transmitter only sends data every five minutes. So really the child and pump need to be in range at least once every 30 to 35 mins and be prepared to sit for up to 5 minutes while the devices reconnect. This is just not feasible during swim team practice, so now we just disconnect and accept we will lose one hour of data. Shame, as we really could do with some data during these high-exercise periods. Hope all goes well with the start!
     
  7. Flutterby

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    aside from the first day when you have to do 3 cals, we only calibrate 2 times a day, the more you calibrate the more likely you'll get a bad cal.. if you can do it twice a day at good steady time, its way better than trying to get three or four cals in. It WILL remind you when to calibrate, ours gives us an hour warning, but you can change that.

    we change every 7th day as well. Yes, after 45 minutes you'll loose data if the sensor and pump are away from each other to long..usually we have this type of issue during the summer when swimming. We just make sure she comes back into range every 15-20 minutes so othe pump can find the signal.. all that 'missed' data will pop up on the screen:)

    good luck!
     
  8. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    You will receive lost sensor alarms if it isn't getting a reading every 5 minutes. BUT if the sensor doesn't get a reading with-in 40 minutes you will lose all the data for that 40 minutes.
     
  9. zell828

    zell828 Approved members

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    So you really don't need to calibrate at least 3-4 times a day? Two is good enough (like in morning and before bed)? I was told the more the better. It would actually be nice if we didn't have to do it so often.
     
  10. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    How to restart the sensor (same as starting sensor except it asks for a blood sugar within a couple minutes verses a couple hours)
    Go to sensor on the pump and hit act (it's on the main list)
    Go to sensor start and hit act
    Go to start new sensor and hit act

    You have to calibrate when it asks for it in the beginning, with in 6 hours, and then every 12 hours (so you have to at least 3 times in the beginning and at least 2 times a day after that). Calibrate whenever the time is right. Don't concentrate on how many times as I would when is a good time to do it. We don't calibrate before eating depending on what the food is and the amount of time before the food goes in the mouth. We do however calibrate before a correction.


    Good luck on your sensor start!
     
  11. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    I would have to disagree with whomever told you that.
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    Whoever told you that was wrong. More is definitely not better.

    We typically do 3 a day - before I go to bed at night, when he wakes up in the morning, and before either lunch or supper (at least 30 min. before he eats). Two a day 12 hours apart wouldn't work for us. There is no reliable 12 hour spread where he would be guaranteed to be stable at those times. With 3 a day, we don't have to worry about it, and it gives us some flexibility.
     
  13. zell828

    zell828 Approved members

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    Thanks, that's good to know. I'm glad you told me otherwise.
     
  14. Darryl

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    Here's the deal with calibrations:

    For the most part, the sensor's sensitivity will remain within a narrow range through most of its life. Whether you calibrate 2 times a day, or more, the result of the calibration (i.e., the sensitivity ratio) should remain about the same. I can say that with most of our sensors, if we calibrated them on the 2nd day and never calibrated again for the rest of the 7 days, the readings would still be pretty accurate. Of course, the CGM will require you to calibrate more often than that.

    There is a good reason, however, to do multiple BG checks a day: to get a heads-up if you sensor has gone bad. It's not so much important how you enter a cal into the CGM, but I would not go more than 8 hours without doing a BG check and at least comparing the BG to the CGM reading. This means at least 3 BG checks per day. If a sensor got partially pulled out, for example, the readings will be unreliable and you'll want to know that.

    However, if you do a BG check inbetween the required cal's, and the reading matches the meter, there is little or no benefit in entering the additional calibration.

    In a sense, then, your BG checks are your safety check, to give you confidence in the CGM at regular intervals. However, not every BG check must result in entering a cal. Only the BG taken in-range, when BG is flat, and at least 20 minutes before eating, shoud be entered as cal's.
     
  15. mph

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    Have you seen Darryl's recommendations in the CGMS forum for calibrations and such?:cwds: There are several good threads to search for tips from experienced users as well.:)

    If you have a hard time getting a sensor to start, just turn it off and wait a while and try again. The Medtronic trainer did not know this and she had us pull Nick's first sensor at start-up and stress him out with a SECOND insertion.:(

    Happy CGMSing!!!!!!!!:D You're going to love them and the graphs!!!!!
     
  16. krstn9@yahoo.com

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    long run.........

    I am not going to give you a lot of details because I know the other posters are already doing this. We started the cgm right when it came into the market. The CGM has its nuances that can be a lot of work in the beginning. In the long run, like d it gets easier and provides added confidence and independance to a child. I am very uneasy when we are without it. I also think that it is very hard to lower an aic without it. The trends that the cgm offers can be very helpful. I can imagine being without it. I wish you luck and patience.
     

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