- advertisement -

CGMs & Nighttime Checks

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MomofSweetOne, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2011
    Messages:
    2,747
    For those of you using CGMs, how often do you check at night? Do you rely on the CGM or still set alarms for routine checks? What low/high numbers do you have your CGM alarm at during the night?
     
  2. suz

    suz Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    284
    We let Dex wake us as necessary and don't set additional alarms unless I'm expecting trouble :rolleyes: Low is set to 80 and High 160.

    I test him last thing before I go to bed, around 10.30-11pm and then when i wake him at 6.30.
     
  3. RacerWife7

    RacerWife7 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    Adding to MomofSweetOne's original question... Can someone please tell me what, exactly, the benefits of a CGM are? Our endo says they're not accurate enough to use as a replacement for BG checks. So, what's the sense? Please, let me know what I'm missing. Thanks! ;)
     
  4. tiger7lady

    tiger7lady Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2010
    Messages:
    344
    We are in the process of getting one so maybe someone that already has one can give you a better idea but this is why I wanted one.

    1. Alert to a low, especially at night, outside of regular BG checks.

    2. Alert to a high outside of regular BG checks.

    3. Trend numbers. See the patterns during the day so I can adjust basal and/or I:C ratios.

    4. Get more info on a BG check. For example. If my son checks his BG and it's 100 what exactly does that mean. Right now all I know is he is 100 at this point in time. With a CGM and a check of 100 I can see:

    100 going up slowly or fast
    100 staying level
    100 going down slowly or fast

    No, it doesn't replace BG checks but it does give you a ton more information.
     
  5. RacerWife7

    RacerWife7 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    Thank you!! :) ...I am still adjusting to all the information the MM gives us. I might end up with information overload if I add a CGM to the mix right now. LOL!
     
  6. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    CGM is the best thing since sliced bread. Really!

    It does not replace blood checks, but it gives you SO SO SO much information in between actual blood checks that you feel naked without it, and you feel like you surely missed some vital information when you didn't have it.

    Trending is probably the biggest thing. Got a blood sugar of 100...perfect, right?? But a blood sugar of 100 with 2 down arrows is a whole different picture. 150 with no insulin on board but with an up arrow...needs a correction, 150 heading into sports with some insulin on board and a sideways arrow bears watching. Etc.

    Night time is so much easier, if we have an accurate sensor and nothing funky going on, I set an alarm and just go do a cgm check, don't wake kid up unless he's high or low or trending oddly. I do the same when I get up in the early morning and he's planning on sleeping late.

    Basal patterns...cgm is invaluable for that. Download the overnight information and trends all of a sudden are just clear as day (not always, but usually). You'll clearly see that at 1am a slight rise begins that ends up being a true high by 7am. Tweak the basal at midnight and rise flattens, wake up in range. That sort of patterns are just not possible without seeing that graph/trending.

    Sick days, oh my, priceless! I'd want him to test 20 times a day on sick days, instead the CGM gives us the info we need.

    I could probably go on....
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2011
  7. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    This is very variable for us, but my son is highly involved in sports right now and highly involved in being a ditzy teenager, which makes for a complicated picture.

    On a basic night, I check cgm at the time I know his insulin is done working, if he's generally in range and no up/down arrows I let him sleep.

    On wonky nights, like last night when he ran out of insulin during the day and forced it out of his tubing with no clue how much he put in and then proceeded to do a correction based on thin air and wishes....I checked at midnight/woke for a BG test, checked at 4am and found him in range and -> and left him alone. So it depends on circumstances.

    I can't hear his alarm, he has a louder alarm that he CAN use, but doesn't always use, so I set my alarm to wake and check him. If he's had a good day and no worries in any way, we both sleep.

    Best case scenario is one quick check in the 2am range and let him sleep.
     
  8. RacerWife7

    RacerWife7 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2011
    Messages:
    108
    ALL very helpful information. Thanks!! :)
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    We rely on the CGM alarms, and do not set our alarm to check unless there is something extremely unusual going on. Nighttime alarms are set at 80 low and 140 high, with a predicted low alert of 20 minutes.

    I will add to what everyone else has said about the benefits of CGM that we have found it accurate enough to eliminate many unnecessary BG checks.
     
  10. lisac

    lisac Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Messages:
    152
    We're new to CGMS, but LOVE it already! We still set alarms and get up to check. Bedtime (ok, yeah right she doesn't go to bed at 9, but that's the goal) 9pm check, husband gets home from work around 12am check, husband goes to bed around 2 am check, I (usually) get up for work 4am check, then when she wakes up. We test ALOT because Hadlee's numbers are still all over the place, so I'm sure most parents don't check this much most nights:cwds:

    The main thing we get from CGMS is you know what that number means and can act more appropriatly. Before CGMS a 90 would make me nervous b/c I don't know if she's 90 and dropping, or going up, or stable. We would treat a 90 before (just in case) and now I feel better about letting her stay at 90. Oh yeah, 1 more thing. We catch bg's coming up and get to treat before she gets into the 300's.
     
  11. selketine

    selketine Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Messages:
    6,055
    With the Navigator (not being sold anymore in the USA) we relied on it overnight usually to wake us up with high and low alerts.

    He just started a Navigator on Monday so I don't trust it yet. Frankly I've hardly heard it alarm for anything (but once!) and I don't know if it would wake me up. I have to find a solution for that.

    I agree with everyone on the value of a cgms - the trend arrows are wonderful. If you can get it so that it is paralleling your numbers then it is priceless.
     
  12. Melissata

    Melissata Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,650

    Typo, she meant to say he started on Dexcom Monday.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice